Tag Archives: Press Photographer

2012: A Year of Deja Vu

In an age that, in many respects, is defined by photography, with millions upon millions of pictures being made every single day, it’s close to impossible for a photographer to produce a wholly original image. Someonesomewherehas no doubt shot a similar photo from a similar angle in a similar way. Avoiding photographic clichs in such an environment, when everything is a clich, becomes more and more difficult by the minute.

Then there are those times when the similarities between two (or more) images can be simply and even thrillingly uncanny.

Sometimes these similarities are purely coincidental; but occasionally, photographers purposefully return to a past subject and location to take a similarly composed photograph.

In 2011, Associated Press photographer David Guttenfelder flew to Japan to record the devastating effects of the previous December’s tsunami and earthquake. One year later, he returned to the exact same spots as his previous photographs to show the progress made during recovery. Fellow Associated Press shooter Steve Rauke has photographed the dignified transfers of numerous U.S. servicemen at Dover Air Force base since 2009, serving as a constant reminder of the ultimate sacrifice made by our troops abroad.

Steve RuarkAP

Left: July 26, 2012.
A Marine carry team moves a transfer case containing the remains of Sgt. Justin M. Hansen at Dover Air Force Base, Del. According to the Department of Defense, Hansen, 26, of Traverse City, Mich., died July 24, 2012 while conducting combat operations in Badghis province, Afghanistan.
Right: July 30, 2012.
An Army carry team moves a transfer case containing the remains of Pfc. Jose Oscar Belmontes at Dover Air Force Base. According to the Department of Defense, Belmontes, 28, of La Verne, Calif., died July 28, 2012 in Wardak province, Afghanistan of wounds sustained from enemy small arms fire.

Photographer Camilo Jos Vergara has photographed the poorest and most segregated communities in urban Americaformore than four decades,using photography as a way to understand and appreciate the spirit of those places andrecord neighborhoods as they change (or don’t change) over time.

But photo-driven dj vu can take one by surprise, too. Blog Submission . Triggered by images’ composition or content, pictures of divergent subjects in similar images can often seem like far more than mere coincidence. Unlikely connections in disparate photos can nag at us, even when the images are made years or many miles apart. And, of course, photographers working in different countries or on separate continents can have no idea that they’ve made an image nearly identical to another taken somewhere over the horizon, or on the other side of the world.

David GuttenfelderAP

Left: March 28, 2011.
A ship washed away by the tsunami sits in a destroyed neighborhood in Kesennuma, northeastern Japan.
Right: Feb. 23, 2012.
One year later, the same ship remains.

Perhaps our contemporary, collective dj vu is trigged by the news cycle’s constant hunger for images. Photographers, after all, do sometimes document annual events at the same time and place, year after year as if nothing at all has ever changed, or ever will change, at that location.

Documentary photography, meanwhile, raises its own breed of dj vu. Photojournalists often travel together and work side by side at the same event, documenting the same momentseeing the same things, taking the same pictures. Even when working independently, photographers are not immune to conscious (or subconscious) mirroring, and the 20th century has provided a litany of mastersCartier-Bresson, Klein, Evans and Frank come to mindwho have influenced entire generations of image makers. After all, we all want to pay homage to our forebears and our heroes. Is it so surprising when, paying tribute, we veer into imitation?

Even the most celebrated of photographers are not immune to this sincerest form of flattery.

In the book published alongside the Yale show “Walker Evans and Robert Frank,” Tod Papageorge writes of the influence of Evans’ American Photographs on Frank’s The Americans.

“Many of the matched photographs reproduced here obviously, and remarkably, echo one another; they demonstrate that, to a significant degree, Frank used Evans’ work as an iconographical sourcebook for his own pictures.”

With this gallery, TIME embarks on an anthropological dig through our collective visual memory, unearthing images from the last twelve months that awakened in us that singular, familiar sense that we’ve seen them somewhere before. Haven’t we?

Interviews and Talks | November 2012

Photojournalism_Links

Video of Steve McCurry shooting the Pirelli calendar…

Steve McCurry  : Pirelli Calendar 2013 behing the scenes video (Telegraph) ‘The world’s most beautiful women, including Karlie Kloss, Petra Nemcova and a heavily pregnant Adriana Lima, cover up for photojournalist Steve McCurry’s Pirelli Calendar.’

Steve McCurry’s Iconic Photographs #1 (Phaidon)

Steve McCurry’s Iconic Photographs #2 (Phaidon)

Steve McCurry (Art Space)

Steve McCurry  (YouTube) ‘Steve McCurry shares his expertise and opinions on shooting documentary photography’

Tyler Hicks on working in Gaza.

Photo © Tyler Hicks

Tyler Hicks : Working in Gaza (NYT Lens) ‘A Responsibility to Photograph, and Remember’

Bernat Armangué : The war in Gaza: photographing the conflict (Guardian) ‘Associated Press photographer Bernat Armangué tells the story behind some of his images that have featured on front pages around the world in the last week’

Don McCullin trying out Canon gear in this 27 minute video on the CPN site.

Don McCullin (CPN)  “The love affair I’ve had with photography has been total commitment and I’ve not taken any short cuts to do it.”

Don McCullin : The Art of Seeing (Guardian) ‘For the veteran war photographer, emotional awareness is the most important aspect of photography’

Don McCullin Reflects on a Career of Chasing Haunting Images (PetaPixel)

Barbara Davidson (PhotoShelter Vimeo) Luminance 2012

Photographers and NGOs : When Interest Creates a Conflict (NYT Lens) ‘Ethical Questions Raised by Photographing for NGOs’

Sebastiano Tomada Piccolomini (Al Jazeera) ‘Scenes from a Syrian city under siege : An audio slideshow from Aleppo by a photographer who spent two harrowing weeks dodging bullets to cover the conflict.’

Crosses mark a field where the bodies of murdered women were dumped in Ciudad Juarez during the 1990s. (Eros Hoagland)

Conflict Photographer Eros Hoagland on His Dangerous Craft (Daily Beast)

Michael Christopher Brown (New Yorker Photo Booth) HBOs Witness: Libya

Photographers Amid Chaos (NYT) On HBOs Witness series

Miguel Medina : Up close and personal with the Syrian rebels (AFP Correspondent blog)

Massoud Hossaini (scmp.com) ‘What’s behind a Pulitzer Prize winning photo?’

Tomas van Houtryve (Oslo Freedom Forum)

Ashley Gilbertson and Ed Kashi (smdlr)

Robin Hammond on his Zimbabwe work.

Photo © Robin Hammond

Robin Hammond (RFI English)

Robin Hammond (Arte TV) NB in French

Old John G Morris interview on C-Span.

John G Morris (C-Span)

I don’t have an iPad, so haven’t experienced using Reuters’ The Wider Image app, but it does look very nice..

Reuters’ Jassim Ahmad on ‘The Wider Image’ photography app (CPN)

Lisa Wiltse (PDN) ‘Breakout Photo Essay of the Year: Lisa Wiltse’s Charcoal Kids of Ulingan’

Scout Tufankjian on the photo of the Obamas hugging which went viral after the Obama campaign tweeted on the election night…

Photo © Scout Tufankjian for Obama for America

Scout Tufankjian, the photographer of the ‘Most-Liked Photograph of All Time’ (Slate)

Laura Olin :  The Photo the Obama Campaign Almost Used for Its Victory Tweet (Slate) ‘How did the Obama campaign decide to use that photo of Barack and Michelle Obama hugging to accompany its victory tweet? The photo that became the most-retweeted, most liked photo in social media history? Campaign social media honcho Laura Olin filled Slate in by email on the gametime decision—and showed us the photo that almost made the cut.’

Damon Winter on photographing Obama in 2008 and 2012 (NYT) ‘A Face More Careworn, a Crowd Less Joyful’

Fascinating video of Stephen Wilkes talking about his Day to Night project…

Coney Island. Photograph © Stephen Wilkes

Stephen Wilkes and his Day to Night project (CBS video on PetaPixel)

Jim Urquhart : Portraying polygamy (Reuters Photographers blog)

Brian Finke  (LA Times Framework blog) ‘reFramed: In conversation with Brian Finke’

David Alan Harvey on the Vogue Italy site.

David Alan Harvey (Vogue Italy)

Elliott Erwitt (Art Space)

Peter Marlow on photographing English cathedrals (Magnum)

Magnum Photographers Ian Berry, Stuart Franklin and Peter Marlow describe their work featured in Magnum Revolution, 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom. (YouTube)

High and Low: Jim Goldberg’s Works in Process (Lightbox)

Harry Gruyaert’s best photograph – waiting for a Belgian parade (Guardian)

Photo © Samuel Aranda

Samuel Aranda’s best photograph: a woman protects her son (Guardian)

Gideon Mendel (BBC)

Pieter Hugo (YouTube)

Photo © Joel Meyerowitz

Joel Meyerowitz  (NYT) ‘A Restless Lifetime of Paying Attention’

Joel Meyerowitz : A Question of Color — Answered (NYT Lens)

Taking His Time: A Look Back at 50 Years of Joel Meyerowitz’s Photographs (Lightbox)

Joel Meyerowitz : ‘brilliant mistakes … amazing accidents’  (Guardian) | The photographer, best known for his 9/11 pictures, talks about his new book, which celebrates his 50 years of finding the ‘wow’ factor in everyday places

Joel Meyerowitz interview by Olivia Bee : ‘The Young Gun Meets the Living Legend’ (Vice)

Fred R. Conrad on photographing Meyerowitz (NYT Lens)

Lauren Greenfield on the Bait and Switch of “The Queen of Versailles” and the Importance of Good Cinematography (Documentary Channel blog)

Paul Moakley (rereveal.com)

Larissa Leclair : The Indie Photobook Library (Lightbox)

Isa Leshko (PDN) ‘Sustaining a Long-Term Photo Project’

Photographer Daniel Beltrá on his Greenpeace mission to the Arctic (Guardian) audio slideshow

Two part Ben Lowy interview on A Photo Editor.

Photo © Ben Lowy

Ben Lowy – Part 1 Part 2 (A Photo Editor)

In conversation with the writer Pete Brook of Prison Photography and WIRED. (Phonar)

Crossing Paths with Niall McDiarmid (BBC)

Sony World Photography awards Student Focus winner Asef Ali Mohammad shares his hopes and fears as he starts his career in photography  (Guardian) ‘What is life like for emerging student photographers?’

How Iwan Baan got his amazing NYC/Hurricane Sandy cover for the New York Magazine.

Cover photo © Iwan Baan

Architecture photographer Iwan Baan explains how he got that New York magazine cover shot (Poynter)

New York Magazine director of photography Jody Quon on Baan’s cover (Time Lightbox Tumblr)

Great Reuters TV video of their photographers describing documenting Sandy and its aftermath

Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 15.14.32

Reuters photographers show images of the devastation caused by hurricane Sandy  (Reuters TV) ‘A witness to Sandy’s wrath’

Andrew Burton : photographing Sandy (ABC News)

Levon Biss on photographing Mario Balotelli (Lightbox)

Melissa Golden (Digital Photo Pro)

John Delaney on Hoboken, New Jersey (BJP)

In My Bag – by Daniel Berman (Photo Brigade)

In My Bag – by David Welker (PB)

The Ultimate Prize Fighters: Practicing Peace through Boxing in Israel

In a scorching hot community gym in the northern Israeli city of Acre, groups of young Jewish and Arab boys gathered to fight as equals. Boxing, it seems, serves as an unlikely bridge to peace among adversaries.

Associated Press photographer Oded Balilty is no stranger to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict—in fact, his photographic legacy is intertwined in the struggle. After photographing the often violent clashes in Gaza and the West Bank for most of his life, Balilty has begun turning to stories that move beyond the violence—stories that offer glimpses of humanity, cooperation and shared experience.

Balilty’s latest series goes behind-the-scenes of last week’s National Youth Boxing Championship, supported by an organization boasting approximately 2000 active members. Although boxing isn’t a major sport in Israel, it’s favored by many of the roughly 2 million Israeli Arabs in the country, who often face discrimination and other economic hardships.

Within the framework of the sport, Jewish and Arab fighters square off, putting aside the tensions one would expect within a physically brutal sport. The young fighters, clad in helmets and gloves, view each other as equals and are not burdened by the engrained history of conflict outside the ring.

Balilty was drawn to the young age of the children. Many are between 9 and 13, ages where children remain unburdened by the conflicts of their parents. “They are only kids—all they care is to have fun with their friends everyday,” Balilty told TIME, “just like in any other place. It really gives me hope.”

Oded Balilty is a photographer for the Associated Press based in Tel Aviv. LightBox featured his work earlier this year in The Art of Storytelling and The Stone Throwers of Palestine.

The Stone Throwers of Palestine

Last week, seven Palestinian men sat for Pulitzer Prize-winning Israeli photographer Oded Balilty in a home in the West Bank village of Bilin. Against a black backdrop, one man posed with a taut slingshot, two small pebbles resting in the sling. Another stared defiantly through a gas mask. A third carried a tire.

Balilty is no stranger to his subject matter. Based in Tel Aviv as an Associated Press photographer for more than a decade, Balilty has photographed daily clashes as well as the longer-term friction between Israelis and Palestinians. In 2007, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his image documenting a lone Jewish settler challenging Israeli security officers in the settlement of Amona.

Although his subject matter is familiar, his portraits transcend the ongoing conflict.

Clad in checkered kaffiyehs, masks and flags, they carry with them the objects of protest used in resistance against Israeli soldiers. Their improvised arsenal of everyday objects echoes the ongoing conflict—a struggle temporarily put on hold while Balilty photographed the men.

“The clashes have been going for years and years and it’s become repetitive, all these clashes every weekend,” Balilty told TIME. “But, this time I said, ok, I want to do something a little bit different. How am I going to show the conflict in a different way?”

He arrived at the idea of shooting portraits, but consulted with his colleague, Nasser Shiyoukhi, the AP’s Palestinian photographer from the West Bank, for help with the access.

“I asked him if it’s even possible for me, as an Israeli,” he said.

Shiyoukhi helped Balilty get in touch with the organizer of the weekly street demonstrations, who gave his consent for the photos to be taken—even arranging for the portraits to be shot inside the organizer’s house in Bilin, a village in the West Bank.

“The Palestinians are definitely not like the Israelis—they are aware of the power of the media. And any exposure for them, in any way, is an opportunity to explain their situation and to talk about the conflict. They are very open minded—they cooperate for a specific reason,” explained Balilty.

Despite the serious nature of the shoot, the atmosphere inside the studio lacked the conflicted tension Balilty expected.

“It’s a very serious issue. But mainly for me, I was trying to focus on the person and to tell like the general story through a few individuals,” said Balilty.

“On the weekend, they are in those protests, but other than that, they are totally normal people—they live normal lives, they go to school, they work, they have families. But yet these guys are always standing on the front lines of the protest and some of them get injured, some of them get arrested, some of them get killed,” he said.

Looking back on the shoot, the photographer was surprised by the way the day turned out.

“At the end of the day, we became like friends. We spent the entire day together, sat together and smoked a cigarette together, and we [shared] some common jokes and it was a very cool day. I wish, you know…it was like that all the time and everywhere. The experience I had that day…for me was one of the best things.”

Oded Balilty is a photographer for the Associated Press based in Tel Aviv. LightBox featured his work earlier this year in The Art of Storytelling.

LightBox updated the story at 3pm Saturday with comments from Oded Balilty. 

Hannah Lucy Jones

This week we are exploring the work of the Fiveleveninetynine Collective of London, the creators of the Broken Train and A Royal Wedding.

London photographer, Hannah Lucy Jones, studied at English and Philosophy at Leeds University, though found her way to the visual world and decided to pursue photography as a career after being shortlisted in the Times Young Photographer of the Year Award in 2005. From there she attended the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ) photo-journalism course at Norton College, Sheffield, and has been employed as a press photographer since 2006. Her photographs have appeared in The Sunday Times Magazine, The Times, The Guardian, and The Sunday Telegraph, amongst others.

To enrich Hannah’s ability to create in-depth storytelling , she received her MA in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication. Her project featured below, To happiness, endlessly, is a chronicle of a solitary journey she made around England, and was intended to evoke her emotional state as she travelled. This project was recently selected for the Foto8 Summer Show at Host Gallery, London, and was featured in BBC coverage of the show.

To happiness, endlessly: To happiness, endlessly, is a series of encounters from a journey around England. Curious about this country I’m from, a little lost in my own life, and feeling unable to make decisions, I opted to travel with no planned route or destination. Instead I was led by the suggestions of the people I met, many of whom spoke to me of their dreams and sorrows. With no intention to characterise the English as a nation, or England as a country, the trip was imagined more as a series of disconnected experiences joined by their happening within Englandʼs borders, a melancholic psychological journey, and a visual diary of what I saw, who I met, and where I went.

Though this was a personal journey, the photographs and stories I collected on the way explore a universal emotional landscape. The project is true to the melancholic feeling I found almost everywhere as I travelled. In the people I spoke to, the places I visited, the stories I heard, there was a common sense of sadness, fading hope, dissatisfaction, hard times. Thus the images are less a document of the nation, and more a psychological journey through its’ mind, using the physical journey around England to locate itself. The final edit reflects this rather melancholic nature.

Monday 4 July 2011

July’s first instalment of Photojournalism Links….Getting a bit sloppy..It’s Monday already again… Oh well…

First off… BJP reports that Iranian press photographer Maryam Majd is still being detained in the Evin prison for her work on women’s rights… ‘Photojournalists appeal for Iranian photographer’s release’ 

Some good news too…NYT: 2 French Journalists Freed by Afghan Militants 

Features and Essays 

One of my favourite photojournalists Shaul Schwarz had two, obviously, very strong pieces on TIME Lightbox last week…a series of stills and a short video, both related to this Narco Culture project…

Stills…

Shaul Schwarz: Mexico’s Ongoing Drug Violence (TIME LB: July 2011)

Video…

Shaul Schwarz: Aerial Drug Bust at the Mexican Border (TIME LB: July 2011)

Schwarz is releasing a documentary and a book next year… Eagerly waiting to both of those… You can see the trailer on the project website here.

Sudan division nearing…

Tyler Hicks: Sudanese Seek Refuge from Bombing (NYT: July 2011)

Sarah Elliott: When Home is New (Sudan) (Newsweek: June 2011) Young Exiles Return to South Sudan

Happy birthday America…

I was following Magnum’s first Postcards from America road trip daily in May… There’s a selection of 100 photos on the agency’s website…

Photo: Alec Soth

Magnum Photos (various photographers):  Postcards From America (Magnum: June 2011)

Phil Bergerson:  Shards of America (TIME: July 2011)

Bruce Gilden: Fresno (Magnum in Motion: June 2011)

Antonin Kratochvil: In America (VII Magazine: July 2011)

Stuart Freedman: Delhi’s Army of Homeless (Panos: July 2011)

Mishka Henner: In a Foreign Land (Panos: July 2011)

Kadir van Lohuizen: The Mapuche Indians (NOOR: June 2011) You can follow his ViaPanam blog here.

Afghanistan…

Gratiane de Moustier: Afghanistan in Transition (Reportage by Getty Images: June 2011)

Was reading Newsweek last week.. It had an article on President’ Obama’s dilemma relating to the economics of withdrawing troops from Afghanistan…Article was accompanied with two Rita Leister – Basetrack photos…see below…

Basetrack’s Photostream on Flickr

Gary Knight: Living with HIV (Burma) (VII: July 2011)

Really couldn’t enjoy viewing the below Dominic Nahr’s slideshow on the Magnum Emergency Fund website, but to no fault of the photographer…Either it’s my connection or bad website design..Every photo ‘loads’ separately and half of the time I was staring ‘a loading wheel’ going from 1% to 100% before seeing each of the images… Annoying..Hope it works better for you..

Dominic Nahr: The Unhealed Rift (Kenya) (Magnum Emergency Fund: June 2011)

Tomas van Houtryve: Laos: Open Secret (VII Network: July 2011)

Abbey Trayler-Smith: KO’d in Kabul (Panos: July 2011)

Stefano de Luigi: Ivory Coast (VII Network: July 2011)

Peter Marlow: Point of Interest (Magnum: July 2011)

Chris de Bode: When the Guns Fall Silent (Panos: June 2011)

Pierfrancesco Celada: Japan, I Wish I Knew Your Name (TIME LB: June 2011)

Jeremy Suyker: Jaffna: In the Aftermath of the Sri Lankan Civil War (Foto8: June 2011)

Muhammed Muheisen: Quiet, but Telling, Scenes in Pakistan (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: Banger Boys (Panos: July 2011)

Eivind Natvig: You Are Here (TIME LB: June 2011)

Articles

This week’s must read…. John Stanmeyer on pitching and planning a National Geographic photo essay…below a photo of Stanmeyer working..

Photo: Anil Chandra Roy

John Stanmeyer: The Amazing Yellow-Bordered Magazine (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

I’d also like to recommend DuckRabbit’s post on war photographers… Make sure to read the comments…

DuckRabbit: The war photographer’s biggest story: themselves (Duckrabbit: June 2011)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.19: Do local photographers have a distinctive eye? (DC Blog: June 2011)

I’d also recommend going back to David Campbell’s earlier post ‘Who’s Afraid of Home?’ to read some of the comments

PDN: 4 Questions to Ask Before Donating to a Charity Photo Auction (PDN: June 2011)

Jeremy Nicholl: The Photographer, The Entrepreneur, The Stockbroker And Their Rent-A-Mob (Photographer’s blog: June 2011)

NYT Lens: JR | Eyes on, and of, a South Bronx Community (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Guardian: Vanessa Winship’s Poetic Portraits (Guardian: June 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Urial Sinai (Guardian: June 2011)

Guardian: Steve McCurry : The Eyes Have It (Guardian: June 2011)

BJP: Stockpiling trouble: How the stock industry ate itself? (BJP: June 2011)

BJP: ICP graduate wins Humanitarian Visa d’Or award (BJP: June 2011)

Black Star Rising: The Photographer’s Life Should Start with Family (BSR: 2011)

Napa Valley Register: Windows XP desktop screen is a Napa image (Napa Valley Register: June 2011)

Interviews 

“I’m doing exactly what I want, and there are people paying me well to do it. It’s a fantastic life.” – Martin Parr

Martin Parr (Urban Outfitters: June 2011)

Lynsey Addario (Youtube: 2011)

Peter van Agtmael (e-photoreview: 2011)

Recommended….

University College Falmouth Press and Editorial Photography students have made an excellent Professional Profiles interview series…

Professional Profiles interviews pt 1 | pt 2 | pt 3 | pt 4

Elin Hoyland (e-photoreview: June 2011)

Seba Kurtis (C U Photography: June 2011)

Pierfrancesco Celada (Ameteur Photographer: June 2011)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

The Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award offers €50,000 grant to develop a project in Zimbabwe | Article on BJP

Aftermath $20,000 grant for conflict photographers and a $5,000 grant for fixers & translators. | direct link to PDF

Jobs – Senior Photo Editor Daily Beast : NYC

Photographers – Stacy Kranitz

FacebookDuckRabbit

TwitterAndre Liohn

TwitterIvor Prickett

WebsitesSusan Bright

multiMedia Love Issue

iPhone and photojournalism: David Guttenfelder

Quite remarkable. Associated Press photographer David Guttenfelder captures Afghanistan using his iPhone (don”t miss the audio by the photographer). Most of all, the images are fantastic.