Tag Archives: Present Day

Guest Blogger 5 – Forward Thinking: Hotshoe looks ahead to 2013 on the World Photography Organisation blog

Covers_01

Hotshoe covers from 1980s to present day

For my final guest post before Christmas at the World Photo Organisation and to mark the end of the year and the start of a new one, I asked the team at Hotshoe magazine to look ahead to 2013, rather than back at 2012, to comment on any trends in the world of photography and to pick out some up-coming events, photographers and works to look out for.

If you ever wondered who we were and about the history of this independent publication (first published in 1979) then follow this link Forward Thinking for some photos, comments and photos. There’s also a pre-Christmas competition to win a year’s subscription to Hotshoe magazine, just LIKE Hotshoe International Facebook page this week, see the end of the WPO post for details.

Enjoy the run up to the holidays and here’s wishing you all a healthy, happy holiday.

Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers Tagged: Bill Kouwenhoven, Gregory Barker, Hotshoe International Contemporary photography magazine, Hotshoe iPad app, Melissa Dewitt, Miranda Gavin

The Bechers on Display at Paris Photo

The work of the photographic duo Bernd and Hilla Becher is indisputably some of the most important in modern photography. This week, a two-part exhibit at Paris Photo highlights the historical significance of the Bechers, most well known for their “typologies”—uniform, photographic studies of industrial structures such as water towers and blast furnaces.

The first part of the show, Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012, features an extensive collection of rare ephemera related to the Bechers’ work. These objects, including posters, invitations and museum catalogues, were amassed by curator and book dealer Antoine de Beaupré for more than ten years.

“You get an historical overview,” said Beaupré. “and also an evolution of how their work developed over the years, especially in the beginning.”

One highlight of the collection is the magazine Anonyme Skulpturen which was printed in 1969 to accompany an exhibition of the Bechers’ work in Düsseldorf. This work would become a monograph of the same name, published in 1970, which is also featured in the Paris show.

The printed objects collected by Beupré represent the Bechers’ work from 1964 to 1977, while a presentation of their monographs, mounted under plexiglass and affixed to the gallery walls, span from 1970 to the present day.

The second section of the Paris show features a selection of 117 photographs chosen by Hilla Becher (Bernd Becher passed away in 2007) from the 1977 book Zeche Zollern II – Photographs of Bernd & Hilla Becher. Together, these prints, objects and publications are a comprehensive tribute to the Bechers’ long and prolific photographic career.


Antoine de Beaupré is a curator and the founder of the Librairie 213 in Paris.

Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012 is on display at Paris Photo from Nov. 15 to 18.

Bucky Miller, Road

Bucky Miller, Road

Bucky Miller

Road,
Unincorporated area, Maricopa County, Arizona, 2011
Website – BuckyMiller.com

Bucky Miller was born in Phoenix, Arizona in 1987 and continues to use the Phoenix metropolitan area as a home base to present day. He received a BFA in photography from Arizona State University in the spring of 2012 and studied one summer at the Visual Studies Workshop in Rochester, New York. Miller is admittedly obsessed with the syntax of photography. He has recently undertaken curatorial endeavors around Phoenix and is currently at work on his first photographic novel. The son of an architect and an artist, Bucky is named for Buckminster Fuller (who he also considers an influence). 

Burke + Norfolk

2011 © Simon Norfolk

The Crawford Art Gallery presents Photographs from the War in Afghanistan by John Burke and Simon Norfolk. Burke was the first photographer to make pictures in Afghanistan while accompanying British forces in the late 1880’s. Fast forward to present day, Norfolk’s work follows the footsteps of Burke. His images are a contemporary response to Burke’s war scenes, presented alongside one another, modern parallels and similar vantage points included.

Accompanying the exhibition is a short film by Simon Norfolk, which discusses John Burke’s photography and both of their relationships with Afghanistan.

Simon Norfolk has appeared in Aperture issue 188 and is featured in The New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture 2011).

Photographs from the War in Afghanistan by John Burke and Simon Norfolk
April 20–June 30, 2012

Crawford Art Gallery

Emmet Place
Cork City, Ireland
+353 (0)21 480 5042

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›› Buy The New York Times Magazine Photographs ($52.50, available here)
›› Order Aperture 188 ($14.80, available here)

Harlem Revisited: A New Look at Dawoud Bey’s New York Portraits

Present-day Chicago is not Harlem in 1979. Present-day Harlem isn’t even Harlem in 1979. But at the Art Institute of Chicago’s new exhibition Dawoud Bey: Harlem USA, some things have stayed the same. The show comprises the 25 original prints from Bey’s noteworthy 1979 exhibition of the series at the Studio Museum in Harlem, plus five previously unpublished prints from the same era.

Dawoud Bey

Smokey, 2002

The impetus for Harlem USA, which was made throughout the 1970s, was Bey’s visit to the Harlem on my Mind show at New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1969; it took him ten years to start and finish the work. And although the images in the show don’t superficially resemble Bey’s later work—they are small, made with a handheld 35mm camera, impromptu and monochromatic, unlike the later work seen at right—the photographer says that the series contains the seeds of his later work. “They gave me my initial sense of how to engage people in front of the camera,” Bey told TIME in an email. “I first learned how to translate the physical experience of the human subject into compelling photographic form during the years I spent making pictures in Harlem.”

He is not the only one who sees the thread running through his work. Matthew Witkovsky, a curator at the Art Institute of Chicago, says that some artists show from their first work a strong sense of who they are and what they want to do. Bey, according to him, is one of those lucky people.

Dawoud Bey

A Boy in Front of the Loews 125th St. Movie Theatre, Harlem, NY, 1976

And Witkovsky says that the photographs, though they remain unchanged, are still fresh. “[Bey] managed to take that ability that cameras have to give you total specificity and imbue it with some kind of other-time-other-place quality,” he says, pointing out an example: in Bey’s picture of a boy outside a movie theater, seen at left, the clothes are quintessential 1970s but the pose is a classic contrapposto. “It’ll always be timely,” says Witkovsky, “because it’s a little bit out of time.”

Bey, who now lives in Chicago, says the photographs themselves are not the only constant. “My feelings about the work haven’t really changed,” he says. “I am still concerned with trying to make resonant photographs of ordinary people.”

Dawoud Bey is a Chicago-based photographer and professor. See more of his work here.

Dawoud Bey: Harlem USA will be on view at the Art Institute of Chicago from May 2 – Sept. 9. The Renaissance Society in Chicago will also present a retrospective of his work, entitled Picturing People, which includes the later work featured in this post, from May 13 – June 24.

Portable Monuments: Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin

Plate 23, Poor Monuments, Aircraft, at right, is seen as it is about to fly into the World Trade Center in New York on Tuesday. The aircraft was the second to fly into the tower Tuesday morning, http://www.forrestmarketing.com/ worldtradecenters/attack.html, 2011, © Broomberg and Chanarin

Exhibition on view:
January 14–February 18, 2012

Galerie Gabriel Rolt
Elandsgracht 34
1016 TW Amsterdam
+31 (0) 20 78 55 146

Galerie Gabriel Rolt presents Poor Monuments, a series of 85 works on paper reappropriated from Bertolt Brecht’s book, War Primer. The UK-based team, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, identify images comparable to our present day from Brecht’s book. Instead of correlating them to World War II as Brecht did, they are revised to embody the “War on Terror.”

The contemporary representation is exemplified through a red box over Brecht’s original image. Here the titles of the source photograph and web address are stated rather than the image itself. In this vein, Broomberg and Chanarin question what has remained similar and what has changed in terms of the fabrication, utilization, and delivery of war photography.

Exhibited for the first time alongside Poor Monuments is Portable Monuments, a further analyzation of Brecht’s poems, where seemingly unsophisticated colored blocks are used to develop a code for investigating and dissecting the photographic image.

Broomberg and Chanarin have been featured in Aperture issues 185 and 204.

Agata Madejska – Contact

I first saw Contact by Agata Madejska back in 2009 as part of the exhibit Menos Tiempo que Lugar, which brought together German and South American artists making work that in some way had to do with the wave of bicentennials being celebrated across the continent. I remember at the time she didn’t have a site. For some reason I thought the work the other day and, lo-and-behold, the work is online. Contact shows photos of ruins in coastal, desert Peru as well as humble, present-day constructions which often look quite similar.

Agata Madejska – Puruchuco, Peru

Agata Madejska – Trujillo, Peru

I like the emphasis of the continuity between something that is celebrated [ruins, ancient culture] and something which is not [present day slums].

Agata Madejska – Contact

I first saw Contact by Agata Madejska back in 2009 as part of the exhibit Menos Tiempo que Lugar, which brought together German and South American artists making work that in some way had to do with the wave of bicentennials being celebrated across the continent. I remember at the time she didn’t have a site. For some reason I thought the work the other day and, lo-and-behold, the work is online. Contact shows photos of ruins in coastal, desert Peru as well as humble, present-day constructions which often look quite similar.

Agata Madejska – Puruchuco, Peru

Agata Madejska – Trujillo, Peru

I like the emphasis of the continuity between something that is celebrated [ruins, ancient culture] and something which is not [present day slums].