Tag Archives: Portland Art Museum

Andy Freeberg, Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley

Andy Freeberg, Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley

Andy Freeberg

Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley,
, 2010
From the Art Fare series
Website – AndyFreeberg.com

Andy Freeberg was born in New York City where he learned at an early age to be a critical observer of the world and the people in it. He studied at the University of Michigan, began his career as a photojournalist and now concentrates primarily on fine art projects. Freeberg has recently emerged on the contemporary art scene as a wry commentator on the art industry itself. Long fascinated with the gallery and museum worlds, he often turns his camera on the dealers, gallery patrons, artists, museum guards, and their interplay with the works of art on view. His project Guardians, about the women that guard the art in Russian museums, won Photolucida’s Critical Mass book award and was published in 2010. The Guardians will be on view at the Cantor Museum at Stanford University through January 2013. His series, Art Fare, documenting another side of the art world, will open at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles in September 2012. Freeberg’s work is in many public and private collections including the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Portland Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Rafael Goldchain

I discovered Rafael Goldchain’s wonderful self-portraits in a recent Lenswork Magazine. Rafael is a Chilean-Canadian Jewish artist, who was born in Santiago de Chile, lived in Jerusalem in the early 1970s, and moved to Canada in the late 1970s. He has created an amazing series of photographs bases on memories, family and fiction, which was published in 2008 by Princeton Architectural Press.

Rafael received a MFA from York University and a Bachelor of Applied Arts from Ryerson University, both in Toronto. He has garnered numerous awards including the Duke and Duchess of York Prize in Photography from The Canada Council for the Arts. His photographs have been exhibited across Canada, Chile, the United States, Cuba, Germany, Italy, the Czech Republic, and Mexico. His work is featured in many private and public collections including the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris, the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography in Ottawa, the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Portland Art Museum, and the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego.

Goldchain is currently Professor and Program Coordinator of the Bachelor of Applied Arts – Photography at Sheridan Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning in Oakville, Ontario, Canada.


 I Am My Family is an autobiographical exhibition that features digitally altered self-portrait photographs. It suggests that grounding an identity within a familial and cultural history that has been subject to erasure, geographic displacement, and cultural dislocation involves a process of gathering and connecting scattered fragments of past familial history while at the same time acknowledging the impossibility of complete retrieval. 
Self-Portrait as
Motl Yosef Goldszajn Liberman
b.
Warszawa, Poland 1902
d. Santiago de Chile, 1959

The self-portraits in I Am My Family are detailed reenactments of ancestral figures that can be thought of as acts of “naming” linked to mourning and remembrance. I Am My Family proposes a language of mourning through self-portraiture and through the conventions of family portrait photography. In reenacting ancestors through a relationship of genetic resemblance, and through the conventions of the portrait photograph, the self-portraits in I Am My Family suggest that we look at family photographs in order to recognize ourselves in the photographic trace left by the ancestral other.

Self-Portrait as Josef Liberman 
B. Warsaw, Poland early 1890s
D. Poland, early 1940s

I Am My Family is the product of a process that started several years ago when my son was born. I slowly realized that my role as parent included the responsibility to pass on to my son a familial and cultural inheritance, and that such inheritance would need to be gathered and delivered gradually in a manner appropriate to his age. My attempts at historical story-telling, cultural and familial, public and private, made me acutely aware of how much I knew of the former, and how little of the latter. I thought of the many erasures that family history is subject to, and of the way in which my South American and Jewish educations privileged public histories. As I reached my middle years it became important to not only retrieve basic historical facts such as family names, dates, and genealogical relations, but also to reach towards the world of my ancestors as a basic foundation of an identity that I could pass on to my son. While I could access the considerable existing stores of knowledge of Eastern European Jewish life, knowledge of the pre-Holocaust lives of my grandparents and their families only exists in fragments deeply buried within the memories of elderly relatives.

Self-Portrait as Luzer Goldstein 
B. Poland, early 1900s
D. Buenos Aires, Argentina 1960s

I Am My Family explores the relations
amongst family portraiture, mourning and remembrance, notions of history,
memory, and of justice and inheritance. Just as I am the carrier of memories
and ancestral history fragments through whom the familial past is brought up
into the present (for my son to carry into the future), the self-portraits in I Am My Family visually articulate a
process of identity representation through which ancestral figures take on my likeness
as they become visible (while at the same time remaining concealed behind my
features and behind the conventions of the portrait photograph) to serve as a
reminder of the unavoidable work of inheritance. These images are the result of
a reconstructive process that acknowledges its own limitations in that the
construction of an image of the past unavoidably involves a mixture of
fragmented memory, artifice, and invention, and that this mixture necessarily
evolves as it is transmitted from generation to generation.

Self-Portrait as Szmul Goldstein
B. Poland, early 1900s
D. Buenos Aires, Argentina 1960s

Self-Portrait as Edmund Precelman 
B. Poland 1890s
D. Poland, early 1940s

Self-Portrait as Don Marcos José Goldchain Liberman
B. Warsaw, Poland 1902
D. Santiago de Chile
Self Portrait as Malka Ryten
b.
Lublin, Poland, 1884
d. Tel-Aviv, Israel, 1974
Self
Portrait as Mojszes Precelman (older)
b.
Poland, 1880’s
d. Poland, early 1940’s




Self-Portrait as Don Mauricio Goldchain Precelman
B. Montevideo, Uruguay 1925
D. Wshington D.C., USA 2007
Self Portrait as Pola Baumfeld
b.
Ostrowiec, Poland
d. Poland, early 1940’s
Self-Portrait as Zyndel Baumfeld
B. Ostrowiec, Poland 1880s
D. Poland, early 1940s

Self-Portrait as Roize Krongold
B. Ostrowiec, Poland 1880s
D. Poland, early 1940s

Self
Portrait as Naftuli Goldszajn
b.
Krasnik, Poland, early 1800’s

d. Krasnik, Poland, late 1800’s

Self-Portrait as Rachelle Goldszajn
B. Warsaw, Poland, early 1900s
D. Poland, early 1940s




Self-Portrait as Pesia Krongold
B. Poland, 1860s
D. Poland, 1930s

Review Santa Fe: Andrew Beckham

Over the next months, I will be sharing some of the photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.
Andrew Beckham is a lot of things, but I would consider him a visual poet, using language both written and visual to construct nuanced work that is compelling, fragile, and poignant.  He is the Joseph Cornell of the photo world, combining photographic memory with objects imbued with ideas and meaning.  I am featuring work from his project, As in a Mirror Dimly.

Andrew received an MA in Aesthetic Theory from Prescott College and a BFA from the Pacific Northwest College of Art. A Fulbright Fellow in Jerusalem over the turn of the millennium, Andrew traveled extensively, making photographs exploring the spiritual and cultural landscapes of the Middle East. Andrew’s work is represented in collections around the country, including the MacArthur Foundation, the Museum of Contemporary Religious Art at St. Louis University, and the Portland Art Museum. His handmade artist’s books have been acquired for the Special Collections Departments at both the Penrose Library at the University of Denver and the Norlin Library at the University of Colorado, Boulder.  Mr. Beckham has served as artist-in-residence at the Anderson Ranch Art Center, Rocky Mountain National Park, and most recently at the Center for the Study of Place.  Andrew is the Visual Art Department Chair at St. Mary’s Academy in Englewood, Colorado, where he teaches photography, printmaking and aesthetics. His first book, The Lost Christmas Gift, will be out in October 2012 from Princeton Architectural Press.

AS IN A MIRROR DIMLY
And first he will see the shadows best, next the reflections of men and other objects in the water, and then the objects themselves; then he will gaze upon the light of the moon and the stars and the spangled heaven; and he will see the sky and the stars by night better than the sun or the light of the sun…
Plato, Book VII, The Republic

Photographs are reflections, refracted and refocused light that mimic what the camera’s lens is directed toward.  I wonder how Plato would have received a photograph, with the negative once removed from the subject, the printed photograph twice removed, and in both instances accomplished by focusing light and shadow onto the wall of a very dark room.  My guess is that he would have been skeptical of such contrivances, preferring instead the wind with the light, the rain with the shadows.  As do I.  But images, however removed from a priori experience, provide another kind of knowing, and not so limited as the philosopher might have thought.

 Looking back through the years that have made up my life, and on to the centuries that my ancestors inhabited, and further still to the increasingly distant past that describes the life of a river rock or the arc of a planetary movement, time becomes both elastic and unknowable.  Attempting to look forward is every more absurd, with the future firmly beyond tangible experience.  It is through wrestling with the vagaries of this inescapable transience that I hope to find some grounding in the present.  My work as an artist is an act of faith that attempts to span such daunting temporal limits in an effort to connect with a universe that is infinitely larger than I am, even I find myself inexplicably connected to it: my family as near and as mysterious as the stardust that formed our galaxy billions of years ago.

 Whether attempting the move out of Plato’s cave, or approaching the ineffable reflection of ourselves in the presence of the diving, the glimpses are fleeting at best.  One way those glimpses are gained is through paying attention, whether you stand behind a camera or no.  In my case, the camera stands before me as a mysterious agent, the dark little room inviting a certain kind of possibility: that we and the image reflect something that we do not fully understand, though with patience, reverence, and imagination, the fringes of a Whole might be mirrored, however dimly.

 For now we see as in a mirror dimly, but then face to face.  Now I know in part; then I shall understand fully….
Paul, Corinthaians, 13:12
ns, 12:12

Andy Freeberg, Spinello, New York Pulse 2010, Artist: Zachari Logan

Andy Freeberg, Spinello, New York Pulse 2010, Artist: Zachari Logan

Andy Freeberg

Spinello, New York Pulse 2010, Artist: Zachari Logan,
New York, 2010
From the Art Fare series
Website – AndyFreeberg.com

Andy Freeberg was born in New York City where he learned at an early age to be a critical observer of the world and the people in it. He studied at the University of Michigan, began his career as a photojournalist and now concentrates primarily on fine art projects. Freeberg has recently emerged on the contemporary art scene as a wry commentator on the art industry itself. Long fascinated with the gallery and museum worlds, he often turns his camera on the dealers, gallery patrons, artists, museum guards, and their interplay with the works of art on view. His project Guardians, about the women that guard the art in Russian museums, won Photolucida’s Critical Mass book award and was published in 2010. The Guardians will be on view at the Cantor Museum at Stanford University through January 2013. His series, Art Fare, documenting another side of the art world, will open at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles in September 2012. Freeberg’s work is in many public and private collections including the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Portland Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Dina Kantor, Ryan, Lane & Lance

Dina Kantor, Ryan, Lane & Lance

Dina Kantor

Ryan, Lane & Lance,
Treece, Kansas, 2011
From the Treece series
Website – DinaKantor.com

Dina Kantor is a photographer and teacher based in Brooklyn. She received her MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts in 2007, and her BA in journalism and studio arts from the University of Minnesota. Her work has been exhibited nationwide and is included in the permanent collections of The Jewish Museum in New York, the Portland Art Museum and the Southeast Museum of Photography. Her work was included in Humble Arts Foundations’ The Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography in 2009. In 2007, she was named to Heeb Magazine’s Heeb 100 list, as well as being included in PDN’s Photo Annual. She has received grants from the Kansas Humanities Council, the Finnish Cultural Foundation and the Finlandia Foundation National, and is currently being sponsored by Blue Earth Alliance. Currently, Dina teaches at The School of Visual Arts, Adelphi University and Nassau Community College.

Dona Schwartz

Looking at few of the portfolios that received Honorable Mentions for the Santa Fe Prize offered by Center and jurored by Maggie Blanchard of Twin Palms Publishing….

I’ve shared Dona Schwartz’s terrific project, In the Kitchen, in my classes for a number of years, so I was happy to see Dona receive an honorable mention for her new project, On the Nest. Dona’s work is about space and time; she examines the “interactions among and within the physical, social, and emotional spaces we inhabit”. She also recognizes the fleeting and evolving periods of childhood, parenting, and being part of a family. The image below, Christina and Mark, 14 months, from On the Nest was the Third Prize Winner in the 2011 Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize competition, awarded by the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Dona lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She earned her PhD at the Annenberg School for Communications is an artist, scholar, and educator. Amongst her many academic publications are two photographic ethnographies, Waucoma Twilight: Generations of the Farm (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992) and Contesting the Super Bowl (Routledge, 1997). Her new photographic monograph, In the Kitchen, was published by Kehrer Verlag.

Her work has been internationally published and exhibited at venues including the National Portrait Gallery, London, Blue Sky Gallery, the Milwaukee Art Museum, The Stephen Bulger Gallery, the Pingyao International Photography Festival, and in numerous juried exhibitions in the United States. Her work is included in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, George Eastman House, the Musée de l’Elysée, Lausanne, Switzerland, the Harry Ransom Center, the Portland Art Museum, the Kinsey Institute, and the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago’s Midwest Photographers Project.

ON THE NEST: In our lives we experience multiple transitions, and in these moments of change we renegotiate our sense of self. Events like communions, weddings, baby showers, and retirement parties formally mark the new roles and statuses we take on. We cross other thresholds without rituals or celebrations—even though divorce is a momentous life transition there is no script for marking its passage. I am intrigued by the ways in which we move from one life phase to the next, and I am working programmatically to represent complex processes of changing identity.

In On the Nest I use environmental portraiture to examine two moments of change that bookend parents’ lives—the transition to parenthood with a first child’s birth, and the transition to life without day-to-day responsibility for parenting when young adults leave their childhood homes. I photograph expectant parents in nurseries or other spaces they have made ready for their newborns, and I photograph empty nesters in the rooms left vacant by their grown children. The nursery is a canvas on which parents paint in broad strokes their imagined picture of the future. Creating the space is itself a celebratory ritual, and for many parents-to-be the nursery is a showplace—and a sacred space—to be shared.

Teenagers’ abandoned bedrooms tell different stories. The transition to life as an empty nester lacks formal ritual observance. There is no finite gestation period and the new beginning it heralds may be more sobering. In some vacated rooms, abandoned childhood toys compete for shelf space with high school trophies, providing a time-lapse history of nurturance, growth, and development. In others, boxes containing once treasured items await their final disposition. Unused beds become temporary worktables. A sewing room is born. By showing expectant parents alongside their empty nester counterparts I invite viewers to reflect on their own experiences of change and the trajectories we trace in the course of a lifetime.

Heidi Kirkpatrick

The photography world is hungry for new approaches to creating imagery as our current photographic environment speaks more to pixels and file sizes. Happily, there is a rebirth of exploring traditional and historical processes and a focus on the photograph as object. Heidi Kirkpatrick is creating three dimensional photographic sculptures after years in the darkroom producing traditional silver gelatin prints, that were, more often than not, tucked away in boxes. In an effort to work in a unique way, her photographs have found new homes and surfaces and they are getting lots of attention. Heidi will be giving a presentation on her work at the Portland Art Museum, as a part of their Brown Bag Lunch Talks, on January 18, 2012 at 12:00pm to 1:00pm. Her series, Specimens, was recently recognized as one of the Critical Mass Top 50 Portfolios. The image below was selected by Darius Himes for the traveling Critical Mass exhibition.

Branch ll

The two images below were selected by gallerist Deborah Klomp Ching for the New Directions exhibition at Wall Space Gallery, that opened January 1st and will run through January 29th.

Reveal

For Fredrerick

Specimens: I have had a lot of physical pain and have for many years. In my continual search for an answer, as well as my way of dealing with the unexplained, I dissect my Gray’s Anatomy book. The pages find their way into Specimens, layered under images of those closest to me. The illustrations bind, clothe and wrap the body. Putting the inside on the outside, I wear my heart on my sleeve. Reminiscent of nineteenth century cased images; Specimens are housed in small hinged tins that open and close to reveal or conceal the secrets they hold.

Heidi is a Portland photographer and artist, using found objects to create intimate and personal sculptures. Her work is mysterious, personal, and nostalgic. She explores themes of family, childhood, addiction, and pain. There is a sense of play present, but serious play that makes the viewer consider their own memories and insights. She has a book of her work, Lost and Found, through Blurb. The work below is gleaned from several series.

I am in love with film. All of my work is made with film. I shoot on film. I print on film. I do all of my own work in my darkroom. I like it dripping off my elbows. I do not use a lot of fancy equipment. My “models” are the people who are closest to me, my family and friends. I love layering the film positives over anything and everything I can think of or find. My studio is filled with found objects that inspire me, and photographs, lots and lots of photographs.

I use photographs to transform found objects into playful pieces of art. Fusing transparent figurative and family portraits with children’s toys and blocks, I create a playful tension between imagery and object. My work breathes new life into these found objects, yet they leave hints of the past in their lovingly worn appearances; the flecks of paint missing, and the soft corners worn down by tiny fingers and tumbling towers.

These works depart from the formality of a frame as they are arranged on a table top or a shelf, often stacked or placed side by side to reveal narratives of family snapshots, or the complexities of the feminine allure. In combination, I give you a chance to visit these earlier playful times while drawing on memories, contemporary issues, and visual formality.

Fritz Liedtke

Looking at participants from Photolucida…

At Thursday night’s portfolio walk at the Portland Art Museum, one body of work literally had a glow (and a crowd). Portland photographer, Fritz Liedtke’s new project, Asta Velum, was absolutely stunning in person. I featured one of Fritz’s earlier projects, Skeleton in the Closet on LENSCRATCH last year, and with this project, he takes a whole new approach.

Beauty is only skin deep. But ah! me; freckles go to the bone. ~Mark Twain

Statement for Asta Velum:April, a freckled woman whom I photographed for this series, told me a story from her childhood. One day after playing outside, her grandmother asked her to go wash up. She went to the bathroom and did so, but grandma wasn’t satisfied. “Your face isn’t clean! Go scrub it some more!” The young girl was distraught, for all that was left on her skin were her freckles, and no amount of scrubbing would make them go away.

While many people view freckles as an aberration or blemish, my response is the opposite. I find them enchanting, unique, even exotic. More than once, while photographing for this series, a model thanked me for making something beautiful out of what they often viewed as a flaw.

This series is hand-printed by the artist as a limited edition set of photogravures. I’ve used photogravure for this series for several reasons.

First, in the digital age, I feel more and more distant from the handmade quality of photography—the manual labor of developing film and dodging and burning prints. But even darkroom work—which I never particularly enjoyed in and of itself—created a product that was made by hand, but showed no evidence of it. For this reason I’m drawn to processes like tintype, encaustic, and photogravure, which show clear evidence of the artist’s involvement with the final product.



Until now, I’ve not been a process person; I’d rather shoot and edit, and then have a print magically appear (which, of course, is the draw of inkjet printing). But I’ve found a real pleasure in the process of printing photogravure. While it’s the most complicated printing process I’ve ever pursued, it does have its advantages. I enjoy the craftiness of it—cutting out handmade paper for the chin-collé, inking and wiping the plate just so, the steady rhythm of turning the crank on the press, pulling the print off the plate and catching my breath, stunned by its beauty. I like the rounded corners of the plate, the indentation of the plate in the paper, the traces of unwiped ink at its edges, the occasional fingerprint. Like freckles, these are not flaws, but beauty marks.

Photogravure also offers a final product imitated but not reproduced by any other photographic printing medium: chin-collé. This method of impressing a second paper in between the ink and the backing paper is a traditional technique in printmaking. It consists of cutting a piece of paper—in my case, a handmade Japanese paper—the exact same size as the plate. When inked, the plate is placed on the press bed with the Japanese paper over top, and on top of that paper a glue is applied. Finally, the backing paper is placed in register over the plate and Japanese paper. This stack is run through the press, which exerts approximately 45,000 pounds of pressure on the sandwich of plate and papers. In doing so, the ink is pressed into the Japanese paper, which is glued and embossed into the backing paper. In this way, I create a unique print, with glowing warm high values (from the warm Japanese paper), placed against the white of the backing paper. The result is a hand-made print whose depth and luminescence is unmatched by any other pho tographic print-making process. They really must be seen in person to be fully appreciated.

I’m also drawn to the tactile nature of a photogravure. The papers used are often handmade, with a texture meant to be felt with your fingertips. The ink embedded in the paper also gives texture to the image itself. For these reasons, handmade photogravures seemed the perfect medium for a series which, at its essence, explores the beauty of surface textures: human skin and its freckles and scars, like a thin veil of stars.

Scans of actual photogravures