Tag Archives: Pollution

Pictures of the Week: June 1 – June 8

From the final journey of the space shuttle Enterprise in New York and the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in London to a landmark trial in Egypt and the once-in-a-lifetime Transit of Venus, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley

The Mississippi is, according to song, a river of black water and mud. But, over a 100-mile stretch between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, something else flows. The nearly 150 petrochemical plants along those banks mean that the region has one of the highest concentrations of industry in the United States. That cluster of facilities, and the resulting pollution and increased cancer rates, have earned the area the nickname “Cancer Alley.”

Richard Misrach first traveled to Cancer Alley in 1998, producing a series of images that were exhibited as part of a “Picturing the South” series at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. “I’d never heard of this area,” Misrach recalls. “And when I finally saw the landscape, I was shocked. It was really extreme—the amount of industry along the river and the poor communities living there—I couldn’t believe it actually existed.”

In February, May and November of 2010, Misrach returned to the region, only to discover that little had changed. “It was impossible to tell if it’d gotten worse or better,” the photographer says. “It looks the same. It feels the same. The roads are still below par, and the schools are as well.” Misrach’s photographs from his latest trip—along with some of his 1998 originals—are again on display at the High Museum of Art, in an exhibition aptly titled “Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley.” The photographs show a bleak, desolate region, and one in which factories and plants are almost always present in the background.

But Misrach says some of the most poignant aspects of the region couldn’t be captured by camera. “What’s not shown is the constant stirring sound; I’m amazed people can work,” he says. “And the smells, from the gasoline stench to the chemicals in the air. That’s what you can’t see.”

The exhibit Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley is on view at the High Museum from June 2 through Oct. 7, 2012.

You can see Richard Misrach’s project on the 1991 Oakland-Berkeley fire here.

Pictures of the Week: April 20 — April 27

From the first round of voting in the French presidential elections and the crisis between Sudan and South Sudan to the continuing eruption of Mt. Etna and a plane crash in Pakistan, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Photographer #336: Nicola Lo Calzo

Nicola Lo Calzo, 1979, Italy, is a documentary and portrait photographer based is Paris. His photographic work focuses on minorities and human rights issues, often in African countries. In his series Inside Niger he portrayed the population that live and work on the borders of the Niger river. The river functions as the center of Nigeria’s economy, but pollution and desertification have become obstacles to economic development. One of his latest series is Morgante, telling the story of several individuals. Dwarfism, a person of short stature resulting from a particular medical condition, is the common demoninator between the portrayed. Nicola’s work has been published extensively and exhibited throughout Europe. The following images come from the series Morgante, Inside Niger and The Other Family.

Website: www.nicolalocalzo.com
(video in French)