Tag Archives: Polaroids

Photographer #449: Miti Ruangkritya

Miti Ruangkritya, 1981, Thailand, studied Photojournalism at the University of Westminster. His work is mainly documentary based yet he tries not to restrict himself in any way. He is currently working on an ongoing project that consists of a polaroid installation placed on the beach of Nongkhai in Thailand. A dining table displays the polaroids without placeholders, inviting the viewers to pick up the images and be involved. By adding mattresses and swimming rings he wants to create a relaxed atmosphere for the audience to enjoy the work outside of a typical gallery exhibition. In his series On the Edge he took a closer look at Siem Reap, a city he had visited in 1991 when there was only one hotel and one bar. Today the city has massively exploded in size consisting of 5 star hotels, restaurants and bars. Miti viewed the city from a distance “from the vantage point of someone approaching (or perhaps momentarily escaping) the city.” His work has been exhibited in London, Paris and Thailand and his portfolio will be featured in the May 2012 edition of the British Journal of Photography. The following images come from the series Imagining Flood, Northern Route and On the Edge.


Website: www.mi-ti.com

Photo Show Naseeb: Trafficked by Sonal Kantaria opens at Next Level Projects London

© Sonal Kantaria, Asha, photo courtesy of the photographer

The Roaming Eye (tRE) has away from internet and wi-fi connections and has instead been experiencing just being, and waiting for serendipity to highlight work. While in Sri Lanka tRE attended a fantastic talk at the Colombo Art Biennale with Bangladeshi photographer, activist and curator Shahidul Alam in conversation with Sanjana Hattotuwa editor of Ground Views – an independent  citizen journalism website based in Sri Lanka. More of the talk in a later post, but tRE urges readers to  expand your horizons globally and take a look at the websites linked to above. Ground Views is a stellar example of citizen journalism at its best.

Back to the photo show. An email arrived from London regarding a photo show Naseeb: Trafficked by Sonal Kantaria about “forced prostitution and the trafficking of girls from India and Bangladesh”. On show are a series of 12 Polaroids, two of which are shown here, documenting “young Indian and Bangladeshi women who have been kidnapped, tricked or sold by their families into forced prostitution, later rescued or escaped and now currently living in protected accommodation in Mumbai.

“Naseeb means ‘fate’ or ‘luck’ in Hindi.

“The protective homes managed by the Rescue Foundation form the backdrop to Sonal Kantaria’s series of portraits, a short video work featuring the perspectives of those trafficked women, and a map piece illustrating some of the now well-known trafficking routes in South Asia. In doing so, the work brings into sharp focus the gender, economic and class disenfranchisement resulting in Indian and Bangladeshi women being forced into the flesh trade.” From the press release.

The show opened to the public yesterday at Next Level Projects in London and runs until 25 March. The Roaming Eye has yet to see the show but will go next week when back on UK soil.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photography Shows Tagged: Bangladesh, Ground Views, India, Naseeb: Trafficked, Next Level Projects, photo show, Rescue Foundation, Sanjana Hattotuwa, Shahidul Alam, Sonal Kantaria

Paolo Ventura: The Funeral of the Anarchist

“Invented worlds” or “ir-realities” are what Paolo Ventura calls the elaborately constructed dioramas that fill the frame of his brooding, dream-like photographs. The Italian-born artist, of the Aperture monograph Winter Stories (Fall 2009), has a new exhibition The Future of the Anarchist opening Saturday, February 25, 2012 at Obsolete Gallery in Venice, CA showcasing his fantastical, moody and meticulously staged images.

In the clip above from 2009, Ventura explains the origin of his project as well as his various inspirations. He also shows the different steps of his work leading to the final photograph–from sketching, to crafting the characters and sets, to setting the lights and taking the polaroids.

A deluxe, limited edition book and print set of Winter Stories is still available for purchase at Aperture. The clothbound collection features 65 four-color images and one unique drawing tipped in, signed and numbered by the artist, alongside an 11 1/2 x 14 in. signed Digital C-print of The Show.

Opening reception:
Saturday, February 25, 2012
6:00-9:00 pm

Exhibition on view:
Saturday, February 25-Saturday, March 24,2012

Obsolete Gallery
222 Main Street
Venice, CA 90291
(310) 399-0024

Ventura has also been featured in Aperture magazine issues 203 and 180.

iPhone photo series: 28 Destroyed Posters of Albanian Politicians

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

This is the second in a series of delightfully quirky photobooks of images made by Frederic Lezmi with his iPhone. Build Gaming PC 2013 . It’s not really a book; it’s more like a box of beautifully printed lithographs on heavy paper so you can take them out one by one to appreciate them (even frame them), shuffle the order, or arrange them as a grid on your wall… They are self-published in a signed limited edition of 100.

I like the fact that they are also ephemeral bits of street art, symbols of anarchy tempered with the beauty of collage, captured on the go with a camera phone, and filtered through a computer application that attempts to replicate the look of Polaroids. verify my listings . They also serve as sociological specimens from the streets of the youngest democracy in Europe.

See and read more here in Lens Culture.

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

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From the series Poor Politicians, 2011 Frederic Lezmi

Photographer #260: Elise Boularan

Elise Boularan, 1984, France, works with polaroids to create her dreamy and sometimes estranged images. Her work is based on a particular perception of photography of which elliptic narration, silence and quietness are key-words in her research. She strives to retrieve something muted and undefinable in her work. Her photographs are both sharp and blurred and contains the saturated colours and haze of the polaroids. In recent years Elise has been published in numerous magazines world wide and exhibited her work mainly in France but also in various European countries and the US.The following images come from the series FEmâle, Lapsus Prompta and her portfolio Portrait / Musique.

Website: www.eliseboularan.com

Andy Warhol: Photographs

The only show of Andy Warhol’s photographs ever exhibited during his lifetime closed three weeks before his death in February of 1987. It was not a showing of polaroids or photobooth pictures, it was an exhibition of 70 black and white prints sewn together in small grids of identical repeating photos. The grids ranged from four images to twelve with the strands of thread linking them hanging loosely in the center. Robert Miller Gallery who showed the work also published Andy Warhol: Photographs and I think its damn good – not just good, damn good.

The central motif of repetition in Warhol’s screen prints is obviously present here as are the subjects of celebrity and the mundane. In a few he directly references himself; one with a four image grid of a man opening his jacket to reveal a t-shirt with a portrait of James Dean rendered in the style of Warhol, and another where he has rephotographed a portrait of Chairman Mao Zedong.

The book’s order and facing pages are paired to link or contrast the immediate subject or to formally play off of one another; stacks of photo prints are paired with shots of leaves, lines of cars in a parking lot faces a grid of venetian blinds, a grouping of skyscrapers and porn theater posters, ceramic plates and a muscular statue, clouds photographed out a plane window face a white fur coat, the modesty of a young chinese soldier matched with a lingerie clad woman’s back.

The act of looking is challenged as our eyes fight to draw themselves from the middle of the grids to see the “whole” and at the same time the individual. The tug and pull of these images makes our focal point dart around the grids searching for a comfortable point to rest – which can be nearly impossible.

The book itself is cleanly designed and edited by John Cheim who ten years later would start the gallery Cheim & Read. The printing is decent but be aware of the binding. After 25 years, the glue in most of these has dried out and the signatures have a tendency to split apart from one another.

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Andy Warhol: Photographs

The only show of Andy Warhol’s photographs ever exhibited during his lifetime closed three weeks before his death in February of 1987. It was not a showing of polaroids or photobooth pictures, it was an exhibition of 70 black and white prints sewn together in small grids of identical repeating photos. The grids ranged from four images to twelve with the strands of thread linking them hanging loosely in the center. Robert Miller Gallery who showed the work also published Andy Warhol: Photographs and I think its damn good – not just good, damn good.

The central motif of repetition in Warhol’s screen prints is obviously present here as are the subjects of celebrity and the mundane. In a few he directly references himself; one with a four image grid of a man opening his jacket to reveal a t-shirt with a portrait of James Dean rendered in the style of Warhol, and another where he has rephotographed a portrait of Chairman Mao Zedong.

The book’s order and facing pages are paired to link or contrast the immediate subject or to formally play off of one another; stacks of photo prints are paired with shots of leaves, lines of cars in a parking lot faces a grid of venetian blinds, a grouping of skyscrapers and porn theater posters, ceramic plates and a muscular statue, clouds photographed out a plane window face a white fur coat, the modesty of a young chinese soldier matched with a lingerie clad woman’s back.

The act of looking is challenged as our eyes fight to draw themselves from the middle of the grids to see the “whole” and at the same time the individual. The tug and pull of these images makes our focal point dart around the grids searching for a comfortable point to rest – which can be nearly impossible.

The book itself is cleanly designed and edited by John Cheim who ten years later would start the gallery Cheim & Read. The printing is decent but be aware of the binding. After 25 years, the glue in most of these has dried out and the signatures have a tendency to split apart from one another. cheap domain names .

Andy Warhol: Photographs

The only show of Andy Warhol’s photographs ever exhibited during his lifetime closed three weeks before his death in February of 1987. It was not a showing of polaroids or photobooth pictures, it was an exhibition of 70 black and white prints sewn together in small grids of identical repeating photos. The grids ranged from four images to twelve with the strands of thread linking them hanging loosely in the center. Robert Miller Gallery who showed the work also published Andy Warhol: Photographs and I think its damn good – not just good, damn good.

The central motif of repetition in Warhol’s screen prints is obviously present here as are the subjects of celebrity and the mundane. In a few he directly references himself; one with a four image grid of a man opening his jacket to reveal a t-shirt with a portrait of James Dean rendered in the style of Warhol, and another where he has rephotographed a portrait of Chairman Mao Zedong.

The book’s order and facing pages are paired to link or contrast the immediate subject or to formally play off of one another; stacks of photo prints are paired with shots of leaves, lines of cars in a parking lot faces a grid of venetian blinds, a grouping of skyscrapers and porn theater posters, ceramic plates and a muscular statue, clouds photographed out a plane window face a white fur coat, the modesty of a young chinese soldier matched with a lingerie clad woman’s back.

The act of looking is challenged as our eyes fight to draw themselves from the middle of the grids to see the “whole” and at the same time the individual. casino dal vivo . The tug and pull of these images makes our focal point dart around the grids searching for a comfortable point to rest – which can be nearly impossible.

The book itself is cleanly designed and edited by John Cheim who ten years later would start the gallery Cheim & Read. The printing is decent but be aware of the binding. After 25 years, the glue in most of these has dried out and the signatures have a tendency to split apart from one another.