Tag Archives: Pictet

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson is drawn to the idea of migration, of immigration, of lives recreated and born again in a new place. Though he was born in Dudley, United Kingdom, much of his own family moved from the Caribbean to the UK in the post-war migration, a subject that he explored in his project, From a Small Island. His new project, Everything Bad is Good for Something, examines migration from Eastern Europe.


Andrew completed an MA in Documentary Photography at Newport (University of Wales) and has since embarked on both commissioned and personal works. These works have sought to examine our emotional responses both to the spaces that surround us but also to the emotional spaces that exist between ourselves and others.His work is held in both private and public collections and he was recently nominated for the Prix Pictet photography Prize. 


Everything Bad is Good for Something
Michele Wolfson cites that “…in the transitioning from one geographical place to another, participants related moving into a psychological in-between space. In this space, they questioned, re-examined, and reflected on the meaning of who they had been [before] repositioning themselves in new contexts.” 
In 2004, the European Union enlarged its membership to include the so-called A8 Eastern European Countries: the Czech Republic, Estonia, Latvia, Hungary, Poland, Lithuania, Slovakia and Slovenia. This led to Britain’s largest ever wave of immigration into the country as an estimated 1 million people left their home countries in Eastern Europe and came to Britain. 

This work is about one of those who made that journey.
Marcela Janosikova left her village of 2000 people, just outside of Bratislava, in Slovakia; and travelled for 26 hours by coach in June 2005 to come to England – without knowing a word of English. To eventually find a life in a tower block in an economically deprived area of England called Walsall. 
This England, though, would not be the same England found in Marcela’s dreams. There would be no Buckingham Palace and no soldiers in red tunics and bearskins changing the guard in this corner of England, there would only be work and the isolation from those who thought she had come to steal their jobs. 

Marcela is absent from the images in this series to symbolise the ways in which, within indigenous populations, migrant identities are as much imagined as they are real. Instead, the family which she has left behind and the migrant husband, who she has found here, are revealed within her spaces in England. 
These are the spaces that, as alluded to earlier, stand in for, ‘[her] psychological in-between space’ where the past and the present and who she was, and who she hoped to become in England, all exist at the same time. 
And yet we still do not see her. 

In addition to the sample images, shown here, the series is accompanied by a fictional narrative which further examines and heightens the feeling of estrangement found within her transitioning from that which she has left behind to that which she had hoped to find. 

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | August 2012

Deadlines

The New York Photo Awards : August 17

The Times/Canon Young Photographer of the Year  : August 19

The PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Award : September 1

Bradford Fellowship in Photography : September 3

CGAP Photo Contest 2012 : September 3

BJP’s 2012 International Photography Award  : September 15

CDS/Honickman First Book Prize : September 15

Format Festival 2013 : September 19

Photo © Kai Wiedenhöfer/ Fondation Carmignac Gestion

High-resolution slideshow: 12 photo finalists Prix Pictet 2012

Lens Culture just published a high-resolution slide show of 115 images presenting portfolios of the 12 finalists for the prestigious Prix Pictet. squido lense . The broad theme this year is Power.

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This photo by finalist Daniel Beltr. Oil Spill #1.

Andrew Jackson

I think some of the most meaningful work that a photographer can create is about personal history.  As photographers and artists, we can bring a nuanced way of seeing to our storytelling, and more often than not, that storytelling becomes a form of personal discovery and therapy.


Andrew Jackson has been exploring notions of identity and representation in his photographs, and his most recent work, From a Small Island, examines the legacy of post-war migration from the Caribbean to Britain by his own family members. Andrew was born in Dudley in the West Midlands of the UK. He completed an
MA in Documentary Photography at Newport (University of Wales) and has since
embarked on both commissioned and personal works. His work is held in
both private and public collections and he was recently nominated for the Prix
Pictet photography Prize.

From a Small Island

“No-one on that ship…thought
we’d be leaving home forever, but when my father hugged me on the dockside, for
some reason, I knew I’d never see him again…I still see my father; you know, in
my mind at least… after all these years…but I can’t see his face….no matter how
hard I try…I never see his face.”  
Amy Jackson
From a small island is a work in development that examines the legacy of migration via the experiences of my parents who came from the Caribbean to work in the factories of Britain. It seeks to examine the shifting patterns of power that has taken them from the rush of youth and self determination, to the universality of ageing and the loss of who they were.

Alford and Amy Jackson, left Jamaica, one by plane, the other by ship; both unknown to each other, and yet, both destined to meet at the end of their travels that would see them leave behind all that they knew and loved – fathers, mothers and brothers – never to see them again.  Yet, for those who travelled with them, on the long journey to the Motherland of Britain, no monuments will be built to bear their names and no wreaths will be laid to remember the hardships or intolerances they faced as they helped rebuild what war had broken.  This is why I have chosen to photograph my family, if only to make a mark that says that they were here and that they cannot be forgotten. There is of course much more work to be done on this series, work that will explore the spaces their lives touched in Britain and the spaces too that they left behind in Jamaica. 

Time though is not ours to own, as we are all powerless to prevent its passage and powerless too to prevent our march into infirmity and the loss of whom we once were.  But, as we all march on upon this inevitable journey, across the sea of life, from cradle to the grave, all that we can hope for is that our mark has been made and a legacy of our passing remains long after we are gone.

Andrew Jackson, Couple on sofa

Andrew Jackson, Couple on sofa

Andrew Jackson

Couple on sofa,
Handsworth, Birmingham, West Midlands, 2009
From the The Hidden Landscape series
Website – WrittenByLight.com

Andrew Jackson was born in Dudley in the West Midlands. He completed an MA in Documentary Photography at Newport (University of Wales) and has since embarked on both commissioned and personal works. These works have sought to examine our emotional responses both to the spaces that surround us but also to the emotional spaces that exist between ourselves and others. He has a specific interest in exploring notions of identity and representation and is currently examining, within From a Small Island, the legacy of post-war migration from the Caribbean to Britain. His work is held in both private and public collections and he was recently nominated for the Prix Pictet photography Prize

Shared Vision: A Conversation with Sondra Gilman, Celso Gonzalez-Falla, and Mitch Epstein

Flag, 2000 (c) Mitch Epstein

In the mid-70s, Mitch Epstein was exhibiting some of his earliest work, some of the images first to elevate color photography into the realm of fine art, joining the ranks of Stephen Shore and William Eggleston. Right around that time, Sondra Gilman, who, along with her husband Celso Gonzalez-Falla, has been repeated ranked among the top photo collectors in the world by ARTnews, purchased her first photograph.

She had “tripped over a [Eugène] Atget show” at MoMA, she tells New York Social Diary in an interview (accompanied by dozens of images of the collection at home in their Upper East Side townhouse), and “literally had an epiphany.” She ended up buying three $250 prints at a time when photographs “had no value.” Since then, the couple’s collection has grown to several hundred vintage prints, and their value, surely to no one’s surprise today, has grown astronomically.

Marcelle Polednik, Director MOCA Jacksonville, Celso Gonzalez-Falla and Sondra Gilman at a walkthrough of Shared Vision during Aperture’s Armory Brunch 2012.

On Wednesday, April 11, 2012 Aperture Foundation presents a conversation with Gilman and Gonzalez-Falla alongside Epstein, whose work features prominently in the Shared Vision collection (at Aperture through April 21, 2012). This ambitious exhibition, organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) Jacksonville, curated by Ben Thompson and Paul Karabinis, brings together their most iconic images reflecting the diverse nature of an entire century of photography. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue published by MOCA and produced by Aperture, including historical context for each image and photographer as well as curatorial remarks.

Epstein, who won the Prix Pictet in 2011, the Berlin Prize in Arts and Letters in 2008, and the Kraszna-Krausz Photography Book Award in 2004, also appears in the New York Times Magazine Photographs, edited by Kathy Ryan, and Aperture issue 168. A former student of Garry Winogrand at Cooper Union in the early ’70s, his work has since landed in the collections of the MoMA, the Whitney, the Getty Museum, SFMOMA, and Tate Modern in London. While his projects often start as independent explorations or excursions, he has a strong inclination to “engage with issues beyond self-reflexive ones,” he tells BOMB in a lengthy interview about how some of his latest projects including American Power, progressed from an editorial assignment, to a print series, to a book.

Watch a great video shot at Tate Modern of Epstein discussing his latest series and exploring what makes a strong photograph. Check out photos from our the walkthrough of the Shared Vision exhibition with Marcelle Polednik, Director of MOCA Jacksonville and the collectors, and the VIP walkthrough during last weekend’s AIPAD Photography Show. And find images of the installation as well as an index of the work on view at DLK Collection.

Shared Vision: A Conversation with Sondra Gilman, Celso Gonzalez-Falla, and Mitch Epstein
Wednesday, April 11, 2012 at 6:30 pm
FREE

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor
New York, New York
(212) 505-5555

Mitch Epstein’s series American Power wins Prix Pictet

The winner of the third Prix Pictet photography award, on the theme of Growth, was announced in Paris on March 17. landscapers .

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BP Carson Refinery, California 2007
Black River Productions, Ltd. / Mitch Epstein.
Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.
Used with permission. All rights reserved.

American photographer Mitch Epstein won the top prize for his series entitled American Power, exploring different aspects of the power industry in the USA. john nichols .

Mitch Epstein said, “I hope this prize draws attention to the ever more urgent need for governments and private enterprise to invest substantial sums into alternative energies that are healthier and safer than fossil fuel and nuclear. And the need for consumers to consume less.”

We are pleased to present Mitch Epstein’s work in a high-resolution slideshow. Also included is an in-depth statement about this important and timely project.

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Gavin Coal Power Plant, Cheshire, Ohio 2003
Black River Productions, Ltd. / Mitch Epstein.
Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.
Used with permission. All rights reserved.

027_AmericanPower.jpg

Ocean Warwick Oil Platform, Dauphin Island, Alabama 2005
Black River Productions, Ltd. / Mitch Epstein.
Courtesy of Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York.
Used with permission. All rights reserved.

Prix Pictet photography prize: 12 finalists

Twelve great photographers have been chosen as finalists for the prestigious Prix Pictet award, which focuses this year on the theme of “Growth”. Lens Culture is happy to present an overview of the nominated work in a high-resolution slideshow. The winner will be announced in Paris on Thursday March 17 by HE Kofi Annan.

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One of the twelve finalists for Prix Pictet 2011
© Nyaba Leon Ouedraogo, Nominated for The Hell of Copper, 2009

According to the official statement:

“The jury looked for photographic series of the highest artistic merit that also presented a convincing narrative about the critical issues of sustainability and in particular, the theme of Growth. Growth, which lifts countless millions out of poverty, also has a huge and potentially unsustainable environmental cost. It presents one of the great conundrums facing humanity in the early decades of the twenty-first century.”

The shortlisted artists are:

Christian Als (Denmark)
Edward Burtynsky (Canada)
Stéphane Couturier (France)
Mitch Epstein (US)
Chris Jordan (US)
Yeondoo Jung (Korea)
Vera Lutter (Germany)
Nyaba Leon Ouedraogo (Burkina Faso) Taryn Simon (US)
Thomas Struth (Germany)
Guy Tillim (South Africa)
Michael Wolf (Germany)

For more information about this year’s Prix Pictet, see the full article in Lens Culture.