Tag Archives: Photojournalists

TIME’s Best Photojournalism of 2012

If 2011 was a year of simple, powerful narratives of revolution and sweeping change 2012 was when things got a lot more complicated.

The aftermath of the Arab Springs upheavals saw uneasy transitions toward democracy. backlinks . The exhilaration of freedom dissolved in the face of new struggles and contests for power: in Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere, the streets are once again filled with protesters angry over the advent of religious radicalism, the return of authoritarianism and the unemployment and tough economic conditions that remain. In Syria, peaceful demonstrations in 2011 morphed into a bitter, bloody civil war that has claimed over 40,000 lives and rages on. Hostilities between Israel and its adversaries in the occupied territories were once more renewed as the peace process collapsed and the road map to a two-state solution looked to have been crumpled up and tossed away. And in the U.S., a seemingly endless, costly election cycle served only to restore the status quo: the re-elected President Obama faces many of the same challenges and obstacles he did before Nov. 6.

Throughout 2012, TIMEs unparalleled photojournalists were there. linkwheel . We stood within the tumult of Tahrir Square and shared moments of quiet with the worlds most powerful President. We documented both the ravages of war on Syrias blasted cities and the devastation nature wrought on our own backyard in the Northeast. At a time when so much hangs in the balance, bearing witness can be the most essential act and thats what we do.

Ishaan Tharoor

London Art Fair 2 for 1 ticket offer

London Art Fair is one of the UK’s premier destinations for modern British and contemporary art, bringing together 129 leading galleries from the UK and overseas.

Alongside the main fair, two curated sections focus on younger galleries, new work and contemporary photography; Art Projects and Photo50. Photo50 is an exhibition of contemporary photography featuring fifty works, curated this year by Nick Hackworth, Director of the excellent Paradise Row gallery. Entitled, A Cyclical Poem, it will bring together the work of a number of British photojournalists and documentary photographers from the 1970s to the present day including Brian Griffin, Paul Hill, Sirrka-Lisa Kontinen, Dorothy Bohm, Marketa Luscakova and Chris Steele-Perkins. The exhibition is an elliptical meditation on the idea of historical change, instances separated by eras, of congruence and difference; it considers what has changed and what has stayed the same.

The fair keeps its doors open late on Thursday 17 January, providing you with the opportunity to look at the work by over 1,000 artists whilst enjoying complimentary drinks, talks and performances.

1000 Words readers can purchase 2 for 1 advanced tickets for this evening; just enter code LAF467 when booking to activate your discount. Offer valid until midnight 31 December 2012. Book here!

Peter van Agtmael Receives the 2012 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography

On Wednesday night, Magnum photographer Peter van Agtmael received the $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, joining a legion of photojournalists that includes James Nachtwey, Paolo Pellegrin and Brenda Ann Kenneally. Established in 1978, the W. Eugene Smith Grant is one of the most esteemed in the industry, named after the legendary photographer whose harrowing pictures of World War II gave an unparalleled and poignant view of the human toll of the conflict. In a fitting tribute, the annual grant aims to recognize a photographerwho has demonstrated an exemplary commitment to documenting the human condition in the spirit of Smiths concerned photography and dedicated compassion.

Van Agtmael has done that with his long-term project, Disco Night September 11, which focuses on the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and their consequences within the United States. But it was his existing work along with his proposalto show the side of the ongoing wars through Iraqi and Afghan perspectivesthat earned him this years honor. An additional $5,000 fellowship was awarded to photographer Massimo Berruti for The Dusty Path, a combination of works examining victims of drone strikes, missing persons and the fight against militancy in Pakistani classrooms.

At 24the same age as many of the soldiers he would go on to documentvan Agtmael began the project during an embed with Americantroops engaged in heavy fighting around Mosul, Iraq.As an American of the generation shouldering these wars, I feel a strong responsibility to document their cost,” says the photographer, whose lens captured everythingfrom violent firefights and days-long foot patrols to the rehabilitation of those maimed by war.”Over the course of my lifetime, I intend to keep returning to [these conflicts] to create a comprehensive document.

To that end, van Agtmael, now 31, plans to use his grant to capture the other side of the conflictto give face to our ‘enemies’ in the fight. “Im ready to shift my focus to the other side of the war,” he says. “The Iraqis and Afghans that have been most affected remain depersonalized and shadowy in our collective consciousness. We live in a self-absorbed cultureone largely unburdened by memory.

Van Agtmael plans to return to Iraq and Afghanistan to follow these stories, but will also travel to the Middle East and Europe in hopes of documenting their diaspora. He’s timed the conclusion of his project to the American withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014another reminder of the human sacrifice and cost of the war. Heplans to use photographs, video, audio and text to share the entire range of what hes witnessed over the last seven years; still, van Agtmael maintains it’s a small shred of the whole. “Most stories will remain forever anonymous, and I’m very grateful to the W. Eugene Smith Grant for the opportunity to document the stories that would otherwise go unseen,” he says. Ive seen a nasty and primal side of mankind, but its been balanced by enough displays of extraordinary humanity to give me hope.”

The $30,000W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography is given once per year along with an additional$5000fellowship to a second recipient. blog comment . LightBox previously featured the work of 2011 Smith Grant Award winner Krisanne Johnson.

Articles | October 2012

We haven’t had an Articles post on the site for a long time, so some of the links are as old as from the past summer, but hopefully still relevant to those who haven’t yet read them… This first one’s recent though…interesting article in this week’s Newsweek by Sarah A. Topol on young rookie freelance journalists working in war zones….The main photo seen on the spread below is by Ben Lowy by the way (who is seen with Nicole Tung in the photo on the right), although he obviously isn’t one of the people discussed in the article…

Sarah A. Topol: Rookie Freelancers Risking Their Lives To Cover The Arab Spring (Newsweek)

Somewhat related perhaps… Action packed trailer to 4 part HBO documentary series on conflict photographers: Witness. Surprisingly, I could find very little info on the series online… It doesn’t even appear to have a website… I recognised three photographers in the trailer… Michael Christopher Brown, Eros Hoagland, and Veronique de Viguerie…There are four episodes though:  Libya, South Sudan, Juarez, and Rio… so perhaps there’s a fourth photographer featured, but I don’t know..

Witness : HBO documentary series on conflict photographers (YouTube)

New York Times correspondent Simon Romero on Tomas Munita in Lens blog…

Photo © Tomas Munita

Simon Romero: Losing Fear and Learning to See : on Tomas Munita (NYT Lens)

Magnum Photos CEO on the agency’s new strategy.

Magnum Photos’ new focus: online, online and online (BJP) ‘Magnum Photos’ activities used to be divided into two categories – new work and licensing – respectively dubbed M1 and M2. Now the agency’s CEO, Giorgio Psacharopulo, is pushing Magnum’s online activities as part of a new strategy.’

Photography writer Mary Panzer on the contemporary role of professional photojournalists using Magnum Photos as an example.

Mary Panzer: Magnum Irrelevant? (WSJ) ‘What does photojournalism mean now when everybody with a cellphone can upload pictures for the world to see, or when surveillance cameras provide the most reliable way to document a crime?’

Photo © William Klein

The month in photography (Observer) ‘The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Lise Sarfati, William Klein, Luc Delahaye and Lucas Foglia.’

Looking at the Land From the Comfort of Home (Lightbox)

Photo © Michael Nichols

Anatomy of an iPad App: A Photo Archive That’s Also an App (PDN) National Geographic photographer Michael Nichols launched an iPad app of his work that can be downloaded for $3.99.

6Mois: Biannual French magazine offers different approach to photography (BJP)

Hipstamatic angst, Instagram anxiety: time to move the conversation forward (David Campbell blog)

Laurence Butet-Roch: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: How photographers can benefit from social networks (BJP)

Introducing the six masters and 12 participants of the 2012 Joop Swart Masterclass (World Press Photo)

Couple of new photo blogs from the Middle East…

Photo blog by The National (Abu Dhabi)

Panorama by Egypt Independent newspaper

Al-Akhbar photo blog by Al-Akhbar newspaper in Lebanon

What sounds like an amazing exhibition on war photography coming up at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston…

Photo © Todd Heisler

Total War: A New Look at Conflict Photography (New Yorker) ‘In November, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, will unveil an exhibition on war photography unprecedented in scale and ambition. The origins of “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath” can be traced back to the museum’s acquisition—ten years ago—of the first known print of Joe Rosenthal’s famous photograph of the raising of the American flag at Iwo Jima.’

Amazing five-volume Gordon Parks collection from Steidl… which I’m sure I can’t afford… I’ve been a big Gordon Parks fan ever since I read his autobiography.

Photo © Gordon Parks

Five-Volume Collection of Gordon Parks’s Work by Steidl (NYT Lens)

James Estrin: In an Age of Likes, Commonplace Images Prevail (NYT Lens)

Are Photography Contests Worthwhile or Worthless? (PhotoShelter)

Photo © Maciej Dakowicz

Sean O’Hagan: Cardiff After Dark by Maciej Dakowicz (Guardian) ‘The Polish-born photographer’s epic study of Cardiff nightlife is a hymn to camaraderie and pleasure-seeking’

Reviewed: The Latin American Photobook (BJP)

Behind the Cover: Bill Clinton Photographed by Mark Seliger (Lightbox)

Dan Winters in a Thousand Words: An Ode to a Friend by Nick Offerman (Lightbox)

Photo © Robert Flora/Corbis

Malcolm X as Visual Strategist (NYT Lens)

Peter Dench: In Conversation With Homer Sykes (Photographer’s blog)

The New Economics of Photojournalism: Online Photography Workshops (BJP)

Colvin’s last passport was issued on December 20, 2005, four years after she lost her left eye to shrapnel in Sri Lanka. Here Colvin wears her signature eye patch.

The Passport to Prove It: A Stamped History of Marie Colvin’s Career (Vanity Fair) ‘Through the blurred ink of immigration stamps and festooned Middle Eastern visas, Marie Colvin’s passport reads like an illustrated time line for her coverage of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election, the rise of the Taliban, the Arab Spring, Muammar Qaddafi’s capture and death, and the conflict in Syria. After becoming a foreign-affairs correspondent for London’s Sunday Times in 1985, Colvin entered nearly every war zone on the planet right up to her death, in Homs, Syria, in February.’

Charlize Theron in talks to play war reporter Marie Colvin (Guardian) ‘Oscar-winning actor has signed on as co-producer for biopic of late Sunday Times war correspondent’

Photo © Henri Cartier-Bresson

Martine Franck obituary (Guardian) Martine Franck Legacy (Lightbox)  Martine Franck, Documentary Photographer, Dies at 74 (NYT)

Dan White ~ 1965-2012 (Panos)

Photographer holds festival of hope amid Aleppo fighting (CNN)

Swedes Schibbye and Persson ‘pardoned’ by Ethiopia (BBC)

Girl from Sebastião Salgado photograph found (DVA Foto)

Two-year probation for Shepard Fairey in image infringement case (BJP)

Kodak to sell off film division (BJP)

MediaStorm Spring 2013 Internship (MediaStorm)

The Guardian relaunches its Eyewitness photography app (BJP)

Carlyle Group to Buy Getty Images for $3.3 Billion (NYT)

Bad news for Reuters (The Independent)

Hollywood celebs and their Leicas…

Leica Cameras, Favored by Celebrities (NYT)

Who Can Improve on Nature? Magazine Editors and Photographers on Retouching Photos (NYT)

Hot off the press: The newsprint as a medium for photographers (BJP)

I AM The Boss, 1982 correspondence between Annie Leibovitz and Rolling Stone co-founder Jann Wenner (Letters of Note)

The most-viewed photo of all time?

Photo © Charles O’Rear

Is This the Most-Viewed Photo of All Time? (Mashable)

7 Lighting Tips for Shooting Video with Digital SLRs (PDN)

Advertising Standards Authority bans two Channel 4 ‘gypsy’ ads (BJP) ‘The ASA has banned two Channel 4 ads used to promote its hit show, My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding. BJP speaks to the author of the photographs featured in the ads’

Greg Funnell: Assignment: A look at the thought process behind a shoot (Photographer’s blog)

Dos and Don’ts: Writing a Photographer Bio (PetaPixel)

To finish off… 52 Worst Photoshop Mistakes In Magazines

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | September 2012

Deadlines

Lens Culture International Exposure Awards : September 18

Format Festival 2013 : September 19

Portrait Salon : September 21

Magnum Showcase in association with IdeasTap : September 24

Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award : September 30

Marie Colvin Scholarship opportunity at Sunday Times Magazine… NB for writers

Marie Colvin. Photo © Ivor Prickett

Marie Colvin Scholarship : September 30

BJP’s 2012 International Photography Award : October 1

Photo © Alice Smeets
Unicef Photo of The Year 2008

Unicef Photo of the Year : NB photographers have to be nominated but you can get in touch with nominators in the hope of your work being put forward to the judging panel. Some of the nominators are Sherri Dougherty, and photographers Patrick Brown and James Whitlow Delano. You can send a sample of a maximum of 15 light jpeg files (72 dpi; 1200 pixels on the longest side) for consideration in a zip file via We Transfer, to one of the three. Emails: [email protected][email protected] ;[email protected]   : October 3

College Photographer of the Year : October 7

International Prize of Humanitarian Photography Luis Valtueña : October 31

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2012 : October 31

PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Awards : November 1

Pikto Top Pick Photo Contest : November 1

Aftermath Project grant : November 5

Prix Lucas Dolega to honor photojournalists who have reported under difficult circumstanstances in memory of photographer Lucas Dolega (1978-2011) who died in 2011 covering the Arab Spring in Tunisia.

Prix Lucas Dolega : November 15

Terry O’Neill/Tag Award 2012 : November 22

The Magnum Expression Award : February 23, 2013

The Inquisitive Photography Prize

Recipients

Stephanie Sinclair was presented with unprecedented third Visa d’Or Prize at Visa pour l’image in the beginning of September for her Child Brides project. The series was partly shot for the National Geographic… You can see the NGM feature from the June 2011 issue here.

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair wins third Visa d’Or prize (BJP) | Stephanie Sinclair Honored Again at Perpignan Festival (NYT Lens)

The above links also include info on the other Visa pour l’image winners: Visa d’Or news award to Eric Bouvet for his coverage from Bab al-Azizia, Libya, for Le Figaro Magazine; Visa d’Or daily press award to Tomas Munita for his photographs of the conflict in Syria for The New York Times; City of Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award to Sebastian Liste for his photographs of a community of squatters living in an abandoned chocolate factory in the center of Salvador de Bahia, Brazil; Prix Ani to Misha Friedman for his report on tuberculosis in the former Soviet Union ; Pierre & Alexandra Boulat Grant to Maciek Nabrdalik for his for report on economic migration in Europe; and Canon Female Photojournalist Award to Sarah Caron. Congratulations to all.

Getty Image handed out four $20,000 grants during Visa pour l’image…

Photo © Bharat Choudhary

Getty Awards $80,000 to Four Photojournalists at Perpignan (Lightbox) | Getty Images awards $80,000 worth of grants to four photojournalists (BJP)

Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant Winner: Tim Matsui

Joel Meyerowitz, David LaChapelle Among This Year’s Lucie Award Honorees (Mediabistro)

The New York Photo Awards 2012 Finalists

International Photography Awards 2012 Winners

Guardian gallery to Taylor Wessing shortlisted four and couple of the other exhibited portraits…

Photo © Jordi Ruiz Cirera

Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize 2012 shortlisted (Guardian)

Firecracker Grant recipient

The Royal Photographic Society Annual Awards | more info (pdf)

Getty Awards $80,000 to Four Photojournalists at Perpignan

On Thursday, Getty Images awarded $80,000 in grants supporting the work of four international photojournalists. Bharat Choudhary, Kosuke Okahara, Paolo Marchetti and Sebastian Liste each received $20,000 prizes and editorial support as winners of the 2012 Getty Grants for Editorial Photography. An additional $20,000 was also pledged to the Chris Hondros Fund in order to further support photojournalism and public awareness initiatives through an award given to Andrea Bruce and Dominic Bracco in June.

Announced at Visa pour l’Image, the annual festival of photojournalism held in Perpignan, France, the grants—first established in 2004—aim to “enable emerging and established photojournalists to pursue projects of personal and editorial merit, focusing attention on significant social and cultural issues.”

This year’s panel of judges, including Whitney Johnson (Director of Photography, The New Yorker), Jean-Francois Leroy (Director, Visa pour l’Image), Barbara Griffin (Turner Broadcasting Systems), Kira Pollack (Director of Photography, TIME) and photographer Stephanie Sinclair, sorted through 328 story proposals from 60 countries, eventually narrowing in on four projects. According to Aidan Sullivan, Vice President of Assignments at Getty, these four winning projects “deal with a range of compelling and multifaceted issues, from the devastation caused by the Japanese natural disasters to modern day slavery in Brazil.”

Bharat Choudhary, an Indian photographer based in London, was recognized for his project, The Silence of Others, which aims to explore the societal and cultural alienation of Muslim youth in France. His project initially began two years ago by examining the ‘Islamophobia’ of aspects of American and British life. The grant will allow Choudhary to continue his project, delving further into specific triggers inherent to French society.

Four years ago, Paolo Marchetti began FEVER – The Awakening of European Fascism after noticing a resurgence of interest in extreme right-wing politics. The Rome-based photographer has documented the exponential growth of citizens fleeing their own country in the wake of the Arab Spring. Marchetti will expand the project to other European countries with the award funds.

Tokyo-based photographer Kosuke Okahara documented the devastation at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant following the earthquake that struck Japan in March 2011. The grant will help Okahara continue Fragments/Fukushima as he investigates the true meaning of the disaster upon the world’s populations through images and audio interviews.

Sebastian Liste‘s project, The Brazilian Far West, explores the inequalities caused by Brazil’s slow and gradual abolition of slavery, particularly affecting the plight of peasants. Liste, a Spaniard, plans to create a multimedia map illustrating the origins of Brazilian inequality and violence, utilizing photography, video and first person interviews to draw attention to the effects caused by 4% of Brazil’s landowners controlling 80% of the country’s arable land.

The Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography are awarded each year. The projects of past recipients may be viewed here.

An iPhone in the DRC: Photos by Michael Christopher Brown

Like many photojournalists,Ive beenshooting with myiPhone for a while.Using a mobile phone allowsme to be somewhat invisible asa professional photographer;people see me as just anotherperson in the crowd.Invisibility is particularly usefulin the eastern part of the DemocraticRepublic of Congo, wherea potpourri of armed groups andgovernments have used conflictminerals as the latest way to helpfund the warfare, atrocities andrepression that have afflicted thearea for more than a century.

The electronics industry isone of the main destinations forthese minerals, which include tourmaline,cassiterite and coltan.They are used to make criticalcomponents of mobile phones,laptops and other gadgets. So it isfittingif ironicthat I shot thisentire essay with my iPhone.I arrived in Congo in earlyAugust to document some of themines in an attempt to highlighthow the minerals travel out of thecountryand the trades effecton the lives of the workers whohandle them along the way. At acamp for internally displacedpeople in Kibati, the phonehelped me shoot scenes unobtrusively.Taking photographswith a phone also raises myawareness as a photographer. Insteadof concentrating on camerasettings and a large piece ofequipment, I am better able tofocus on the situation beforeme. It becomes more about howI feel and what I see.

In Congo, the effects of themineral trade on every personslifeeven the lives ofpeople who arent working atthe minesare palpable. At aHeal Africa clinic in Goma, Imet an emaciated teenage girlwho had been gang-raped bythree Hutu militiamen allegedly funded by profits fromthe mines.Im not advocating givingup our gadgets. The causes ofproblems in Congo are far morecomplex. There are industry sponsored programslike Solutions for Hope, whichtries to monitor coltan. Butauditing the origins of theseminerals is complicated by inaccessibilityand danger. Id likepeople to pause when they lookat these photographs, takingtime to think about where thematerial for modern technology comes fromand what lives are affected before they get into thephones in our hands.

Michael Christopher Brown is a photographer based in New York City. Directory Submission . His photographs appear in this week’s issue of TIME. See more of his work here.

apertureWEEK: Photography Reading Shortlist

© International Center of Photography, 2012. Photograph by John Berens.

›› Throw out your SLR? App-maker Hipstamatic announced its plans to launch the Hipstamatic Foundation for Photojournalism to educate and support ”the next generation of photographic storytellers using smartphones with Hipstamatic.” Photojournalist Brad Mangin posted “How I Made Instagram Images That Were Good Enough for Sports Illustrated,” an essay about how he got a portfolio of iPhone Instagrams published, and how you can too. Traditional photojournalists everywhere are groaning, but check out Benjamin Lowy’s blog featuring his reports from Libya via Instagram (supported in part by a Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund grant) and judge for yourself.

›› The Associated Press has announced that it will be using robotic cameras (in addition to its team of photographers) to photograph the 2012 Summer Olympics in London. These cameras, which have been mounted on ceilings and the bottom of pools, will provide an otherwise impossible perspective on the games. On the heels of the highly controversial Olympics Portraits that made the rounds on the web earlier this month, LightBox tells the story of The Best Magazine Assignment Ever, photographer’s Neil Leifer’s 1984 “Olympic Odyssey Around the World” during which he traveled to 13 different countries to create a collection of images that would appear in TIME’s preview of the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

›› The New York Times Lens Blog published a collection of color slides taken by groundbreaking American photographer, musician, writer and film director Gordon Parks in 1956, images from his “Segregation Series” that had been thought lost until they were found at the bottom of a box this spring. The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture opened Gordon Parks: 100 Moments, a retrospective focusing on the photographer’s work in Harlem and Washington D.C. in the 1940s. The International Center of Photography opened an exhibition of Parks’ photographs in May, and they’ll be on view until January 2013. Parks, who died in 2006, would have been 100 this year.

›› What does the future hold for photography publishing? The British Journal of Photography reported on the growing body of work being printed on newsprint, profiling publications by Jason Larkin, Guy Martin, Alec Soth, and Rob Hornstra, who are enthusiastic about the medium’s affordability and impermanence. Joerg Colberg discussed how serious photography might best use the internet as a means of dissemination.

›› The Guardian’s Geoff Dyer profiles StreetViewer photographer Michael Wolf, as well as Doug Rickard whose forthcoming monograph A New American Picture sparked lively debate on our Facebook page last week, some condemning his practice as lazy appropriation, and others praising its conceptual ingenuity. In discussing Rickard, Dyer links “this new way of working” to the candid photography traditions of Paul Strand, Robert Frank, and Walker Evans: “The shifting spirit of Robert Frank seems also to be lurking, as if the Google vehicle were an updated incarnation of the car in which he made his famous mid-50s road trip to produce his photographic series, The Americans.” In other virtual reality news, StreetView now includes images from the Antarctic huts of explorers Shackleton and Scott, providing yet more digital space for such artists to explore.