Tag Archives: Photojournalism

TIME Picks the Top 10 Photos of 2012

Ten percent of all of the photographs made in the entire history of photography were made last year — an astounding figure. More than ever before, thanks in part to cell phone technology, the world is engaged with photography and communicating through pictures.

Nonetheless, a great photograph will rise above all the others. The ten photographs we present here are the pictures that moved us most in 2012. They all deliver a strong emotional impact — whether they show a child mourning his father who was killed by a sniper in Syria (slide #3); a heartbreaking scene in a Gaza City morgue (slide #1); a haunting landscape of New Jersey coastline after Hurricane Sandy, a rollercoaster submerged under the tide (slide #2); or a rare glimpse of President Obama moments before he goes out on stage during a campaign rally (slide #9). We spoke to each of the photographers about their images, and their words provide the captions here.

Over the past several days, we’ve unveiled TIME’s Best Photojournalism and Best Portraits of the Year galleries on LightBox. And in the next three weeks, we will be rolling out even more end-of-year features: the Most Surprising Pictures of the Year; the Best Photo Books of the Year; the Top 10 Photographic Magazine Covers of the Year and other compelling galleries. We will also recognize TIME’s choice for the Best Wire Photographer of the Year. Senior photo editor Phil Bicker is curating many of these galleries with help from the photo team at TIME. His discerning eye has been responsible for the curation of TIME’s Pictures of the Week throughout the year, galleries that regularly present the best of the week’s images, with surprising and sometimes offbeat takes on the news.  We will round off the year on December 31 with our second-annual “365: Year in Pictures,” a comprehensive look at the strongest picture of every day of 2012.

Kira Pollack, Director of Photography

TIME’s Best Photojournalism of 2012

If 2011 was a year of simple, powerful narratives of revolution and sweeping change 2012 was when things got a lot more complicated.

The aftermath of the Arab Springs upheavals saw uneasy transitions toward democracy. backlinks . The exhilaration of freedom dissolved in the face of new struggles and contests for power: in Tunisia, Egypt and elsewhere, the streets are once again filled with protesters angry over the advent of religious radicalism, the return of authoritarianism and the unemployment and tough economic conditions that remain. In Syria, peaceful demonstrations in 2011 morphed into a bitter, bloody civil war that has claimed over 40,000 lives and rages on. Hostilities between Israel and its adversaries in the occupied territories were once more renewed as the peace process collapsed and the road map to a two-state solution looked to have been crumpled up and tossed away. And in the U.S., a seemingly endless, costly election cycle served only to restore the status quo: the re-elected President Obama faces many of the same challenges and obstacles he did before Nov. 6.

Throughout 2012, TIMEs unparalleled photojournalists were there. linkwheel . We stood within the tumult of Tahrir Square and shared moments of quiet with the worlds most powerful President. We documented both the ravages of war on Syrias blasted cities and the devastation nature wrought on our own backyard in the Northeast. At a time when so much hangs in the balance, bearing witness can be the most essential act and thats what we do.

Ishaan Tharoor

Review Santa Fe: Cristina De Middel

Over the next month, I will be sharing some of the photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  

Cristina De Middel’s amazing series, The Afronauts, has been on my radar for awhile.  The first time I saw the series, it took my breath away with its originality and subject matter.  The buzz at Review Santa Fe was not just about the work, but about the amazing book that accompanied it.  Unfortunately, the book is sold out, but it’s a sign that we need to be first in line for her next offering.
Cristina De Middel is a documentary photographer and artist now
based in London that has been working as a photojournalist for different
newspapers in Spain (and with NGO´s such as Doctors Without Borders or
the Spanish Red Cross) for almost 10 years . She combines her strictly
documentary assignments , which has been exhibited and awarded in
several occasions (including a National Photojournalism Award Juan
Cancelo  and a special mention at the New Fnac Photographic Talent ),
with more personal projects . This B-side of Cristina´s work 
deliberately  asks the audience to question the language and the
veracity of photography  as a document and plays with reconstructions 
or archetypes that blur the border between reality and fiction. She received her MA in Fine Arts at the Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Spain, her MA in Photography at the University of Oklahoma, a postgraduate degree in Photojournalism at the Barcelona Autónoma University, Spain and spent time in IV War Correspondents Training in Madrid Spain.

Images from the Afronauts book

Images from The Afronauts

 The AfronautsIn 1964, still leaving the dream of their recently gained independence, Zambia started a space program that would put the first African on the moon catching up  the USA and the Soviet Union in the space race.

 Only a few  optimists supported the project by Edward Makuka, the school teacher in charge of presenting the ambitious program and getting its necessary funding. But the financial aid never came, as the United Nations declined their support, and one of the astronauts , a 16 year old girl, got pregnant and had to quit.

 That is how the heroic initiative turned into an exotic episode of the African history, surrounded by wars, violence, droughts and hunger.

As a photojournalist I have always been attracted by the eccentric lines of story-telling avoiding the same old subjects told in the same old ways.
Now , with my personal projects,  I respect the basis of the truth but allow myself to break the rules of veracity trying to push the audience into analyzing the patterns of the stories we consume as real.

 “Afronauts” is based on the documentation of an impossible dream that only lives in the pictures.

 I start from a real fact that took place 50 years ago and rebuild the documents adapting them to my personal imagery .

Interview: Nicole Tung on covering the battle for Aleppo

Earlier this month, TIME published A Syrian Tragedy: One Family’s Horror, a series of images shot by freelance photographer Nicole Tung. The images, shot in Aleppo as the Syrian city was under attack, portray civil casualties, highlighting how the war has torned apart families. For the past four months, Nicole has been documenting the uprising in Syria. Months before, she was in Libya, covering her first violent conflict at just 25.

Nicole started taking pictures when she was 15, living in Hong Kong, her hometown. “A good friend of mine, who also became a photographer, also served as one of my inspirations,” she says. “He showed me the first book in contemporary photojournalism that I clearly remember today, Winterreise by Luc Delahaye.” She studied journalism and history at New York University, and has since been published by The New York Times, TIME and Global Post among many other magazines and newspapers.

In an interview with Photojournalism Links, she tells us more about her work in Syria, how she gained access to the country and what she’s seen there.

Men carry the body of Hatem Qureya, 15, after he was trapped under rubble following an airstrike in the neighborhood of Bustan al Qasr in Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, August 6, 2012 which claimed at least eight lives including five children from the same family. Hatem later died at the field hospital. His father, mother, younger brother and sister and two younger cousins were also killed. Bustan al Qasr, a Free Syrian Army controlled district in south west Aleppo, has consistently been shelled and attacked by helicopters and planes over the last two weeks after the FSA entered Syria’s commercial capital and its most populated city. According to the UN, over 200,000 civilians have fled the city, whilst many other displaced remain inside, seeking refuge in mosques, parks, and schools. Bustan al Qasr remains almost fully populated by its residents who chose not to flee. Image © Nicole Tung.

Mikko Takkunen and Olivier Laurent: Why did you decide to go to Syria?

Nicole Tung: I decided to go to Syria because I felt that the coverage was lacking from the inside. But I was also personally curious and I wanted to fulfill something that the late Marie Colvin once said: “Our mission is to report these horrors of war with accuracy and without prejudice.” Marie was a friend and I felt that her death could not, should not, cow journalists from carrying out their missions. She would have been disappointed to know that her death was the reason so many decided to turn off from directly covering Syria. I admired her deeply, and felt the best way to honor her, and other colleagues killed in the past year was to continue working.

MT & OL: How did you manage to enter the country?

NT: I entered the country through Turkey, like many journalists do. Up until a few weeks ago, all the crossings in to Syria via Turkey had to be illegal. It involved some running across border areas with gear in hand, to avoid the Turkish military police.

MT & OL: How did you make your way to Aleppo?

NT: I first went to Aleppo city a week before the fighting began on July 20. I was in the Reef Aleppo (the country side), spending time in the towns there that were experiencing frequent helicopter and shelling attacks by the government forces. At that time, Aleppo was still in full control of the military, intelligence, and police units and getting in meant sneaking through back roads, avoiding the plentiful checkpoints, and high tailing it in to a safe house in the city. One could not really work as a photographer in Aleppo just four weeks ago– spies were everywhere and you were busy focusing on not sticking out, so having a camera in public, even out in the car, was absolutely out of the question.

The brother of Abdul Latif Qureya, 33, reads the Koran near his body after he was killed in an airstrike in the neighborhood of Bustan al Qasr in Aleppo, Syria, on Monday, August 6, 2012 which claimed at least eight lives including five children from the same family. Abdul Latif Qureya’s wife Wahiba, two sons, Hatem, 15, and Mahmoud, 14, and his 8-year-old daughter Bara’a as well as a neice, 7, and nephew, 1, were killed in the same airstrike. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: Was sending your work back to your editors a struggle? How did you manage it?

NT: When I went back to Aleppo as the fighting started, sending work back to editors was and is, certainly a struggle. Many of the activists there were caught off guard, I think, by the actual fighting having finally reached Aleppo. I saw a steady decline in the quality of communications over a three-week period. Phone networks in the city started to fail, and the 3G Internet the activists often relied on began to shut down too, besides the fact that it was very difficult to buy credit. Only a few, highly skilled activists could set up satellite Internet quickly enough, or run DSL connections out of still-government controlled areas of the city. Added to that was the severe electricity cuts that about 70% of the city was experiencing. I managed to send images out because of the Syrians, who would often go to the ends of the Earth to help me. They worked tirelessly to get a car, to get fuel for the car, to make sure the roads were safe, then worked to get you to a physical location in order to connect to the Internet. And then they stayed with you, drank tea and coffee with you, for hours on end while your files were beamed halfway across the world. It is a cumbersome way, but often the only way, to work in Syria. I have never experienced such patience and generosity from people who are themselves going through the darkest hours of their life.

MT & OL: Where you working with other photographers/journalists while there?

NT: I was working with one other videographer whilst I was there. It’s difficult to work in Syria in big groups because of the logistics. Also, in a dangerous situation, having too many opinions from too many colleagues often causes more problems.

MT & OL: Did you have an assignment before you left for Syria or were you confident you were going to get published once you were in the country?

NT: The first time I went into Syria at the end of May this year, I did not have an assignment. I was there to establish contacts and get a better idea of what things looked like on the ground. I went back several times, selling images to various publications before getting an assignment in June to go back in with Die Zeit. When I was not on assignment — I want to say I was confident, but in those situations you just never know — I knew for a fact that there were very few journalists covering Syria from the inside because of the dangers it posed and for logistical reasons. I thought that having a view from the ground might be somewhat valuable in itself.

Demonstrators shout slogans as they carry the bodies of nine civilians killed the night before by mortars fired on the city of Maarat Al Noman by the Syrian Army on Sunday, June 10, 2012. Estimates put the death toll between 20-30 people as many died on their way to Turkey for further medical treatment, and over 100 people were injured. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: Your work for TIME in Aleppo has received particular attention. Can you tell us about your experience on the ground in Aleppo?

NT: I witnessed the situation in Aleppo both before and after the fight for the city began on July 20. It was incredible to see the changes because the neighborhoods which are experiencing the heaviest fighting now, and which have been hardest hit, were the most defiant in terms of staging almost nightly demonstrations against the government even in a very tightly controlled city. When I first went there, checkpoints had been set up on all the main arteries of Aleppo. I moved around with doctors and activists who took incredible risks to do their jobs and added more risk by having a foreign journalist in their car. I couldn’t have my camera out at all, because there were pro-government militias known as ‘shebiha’ all around, and informers for the regime, as well. The only time I could take my camera out briefly was when I was at the demonstrations, running the risk that the protest would be broken up at any given time if the security forces open fired on the crowd, which they did very often.

I saw the Aleppo Underground as it was. There were doctors clandestinely treating injured protestors at private and sometimes public hospitals, and falsifying their medical reports (taking care not to write ‘gun shot wound’ or any other violence related injuries) to avoid scrutiny by security. There were pharmacists shuttling medical supplies in and out of the city to other affected areas around the country. Women who left the comfort of their middle-upper class life to deliver clothes, food, and formula to families who sought refuge in Aleppo from places like Homs and Hamah. One woman even counseled girls who had been raped. There were teenagers, all high school students, who dared to protest and were arrested, often tortured before being released and they were back on the streets the very next day protesting again. And then there were the Aleppo University students who became the heart of the uprising in city, through their shows of multiple, daily demonstrations in front of their faculties. They paid a high price for it, often getting beaten, shot at, and arrested by the security forces on campus. No less than one dozen students were killed on university grounds over the months of protests, and in June 2012, three medical students were found bound, shot, and their bodies burned for attempting to treat an injured protestor. The revolution was very much alive, and it was conducted almost completely through peaceful means. But finally, the war came to Aleppo, and since then, overcrowded neighborhoods have become ghost towns, the chatter and noise of daily life and children has given way to the sound of incoming mortar rounds, tank shells, the drone of helicopters and furious sound of diving fighter jets. Shelling in the contested areas of the city has no pattern and it is indiscriminate, often hitting civilians in their own homes. The Free Syrian Army has continued to pour in to the city. They have the advantage of knowing the streets and urban warfare is their forte. But they still lack weapons to make any real gain on the government forces. Civilians in some neighborhoods have fled to other parts of the city, to parks, university dormitories, and mosques whilst others have gone to Aleppo’s countryside. Some families have been displaced twice over as they left Hamah and Homs, only to be leaving their refuge in Aleppo. That was my experience in Aleppo: the situation was fluid, and working around it was incredibly difficult.

MT & OL: You concentrated a lot more on civilians rather than FSA fighters. Was this something you had decided beforehand or did it just happen?

NT: I did not decide beforehand that I would cover specifically civilians, but it became very apparent to me, once I was there, that it was necessary. The war is fought by two sides with particular, sometimes varying, agendas. Photographing combat is dangerously addictive to some people. I have a one-day tolerance for it when I’m there before I find that most of those images end up looking the same and provide little scope for what else is happening. Certainly the FSA is up against a violently disproportionate use of weapons but the civilians are the quiet sufferers of what happens on the battlefield. Assad’s forces don’t hesitate to kill them if they peacefully demonstrate or harbor FSA fighters in their neighborhoods. Often, the FSA base themselves there to try and protect the civilian population or use it as a point from which to attack the Syrian Army. But it’s the civilians who pay the price because they lose their lives and lose their homes. Sometimes there’s no reason at all for killing civilians. The worst is seeing children getting injured, or dying. For what, though? When I witnessed an airstrike last week that killed five children from the same family, it occurred to me that it was something beyond comprehension, beyond reason. At that point, agendas don’t matter at all.

Men gather at a graveyard on the outskirts of Anadan, Syria, on Friday, June 8, 2012 to bury Fawaz Omar Abdullah, 30, a civilian who was shot and killed by a Syrian Army sniper the day before as he was walking near a checkpoint in the village. Image © Nicole Tung.

MT & OL: How widely have your images been published?

NT: Certainly the advantage of having published with TIME is that many people see those images, and I have the editors there to thank for their support when I was working in an extremely difficult situation. They have since gone on to CNN, Human Rights Watch, Paris Match, other European publications and will also be screened at Visa Pour l’Image in September.

MT & OL: How different was covering Syria compared to Libya?

NT: Syria is far more dangerous and complicated than anything I ever experienced in Libya. Libya was the first combat zone I’d ever been to and I was lucky to have so many veteran journalists around who looked out for me and guided us younger photographers. We also shared rides with them and listened to (or more correctly, noted) their advice, followed them as they worked, and learned from them. I was fortunate to have security consultants lend me body armor and give me crash courses in first aid. Syria has none of those luxuries. I’ve since picked up my own body armor, took a combat medical training course, and made a fair number of my own contacts inside. You are on your own from beginning to end, and you cannot rely on anyone but yourself. The government’s use of fire power is unlimited. At least there was a no-fly zone very quickly established in Libya, but in Syria, anything goes. The people of Libya and Syria are not so different, though. I have met some of the most generous, warm hearted people working in both countries and their hospitality often knows no bounds.

MT & OL: Now that you are out of the country, what are your plans? Are you going back? Or will it prove difficult to go back?

NT: I will continue to go back to Syria because, like Libya, I have become committed to the story and the path of where the country will go. It will prove difficult going back only because of people’s concerns about my safety, which I certainly understand.

MT & OL: How do you see the situation evolving in Syria in the coming weeks?

NT: In the coming weeks, the fight for Aleppo will still be going on. The rebels there are no match to the forces of Assad, especially when they continuously run low on ammunition. The country is already in chaos when you think about how many millions are displaced by fighting, how many thousands of lives have been lost, and the amount of destruction this war has wrought, physically, financially, and emotionally. Added to that is the lack of unity from both political and military groups from the opposition. While Damascus and Aleppo become the biggest news stories, other cities near Idlib and Hamah continue to get pounded by government forces. And let’s say Assad were to be finished off tomorrow, what will a new government look like? Will minority groups be proportionately represented? And what about the regional implications of this war? These are all questions the Syrians are still wrestling with. Most don’t have answers that would satisfy the international community.

Nicole Tung’s images can be seen on TIME’s Lightbox here and here.

For more information about Nicole Tung, visit her website at www.nicoletung.com.

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | August 2012

Deadlines

The New York Photo Awards : August 17

The Times/Canon Young Photographer of the Year  : August 19

The PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Award : September 1

Bradford Fellowship in Photography : September 3

CGAP Photo Contest 2012 : September 3

BJP’s 2012 International Photography Award  : September 15

CDS/Honickman First Book Prize : September 15

Format Festival 2013 : September 19

Photo © Kai Wiedenhöfer/ Fondation Carmignac Gestion

Julia Gillard, Man with Shrubbery

Julia Gillard, Man with Shrubbery

Julia Gillard

Man with Shrubbery,
Miami, Florida, 2011
From the Greetings from Florida series
Website – JuliaGillard.com

Julia Gillard was born in Illinois. She is a graduate of the International Center of Photography’s Photojournalism and Documentary Photography Program. Her work has been exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum, The New York Historical Society, powerHouse, Capricious Space, Galleri Lundh Åstrand (Stockholm), and has appeared in New York Magazine, Mother Jones, The Fader and the New York Times. Her new series, Greetings From Florida is being exhibited through July 30th at This Must Be The Place in Brooklyn, New York. 

Features and Essays | Wednesday 16 May 2012

First two little announcements…Photojournalism Links is going to go through couple of changes. As the posts have been getting longer and slightly more infrequent, I’ve decided that it’s better to post some of the different categories separately. So from now on, for instance Features and Essays will be posted on their own. Also.. for the past over four years, the site has been a one-man operation by me, but I’ve now teamed up with my friend, journalist Olivier Laurent, to work on the site together. As I’m sure most of you will know, Olivier’s day-job is being the news editor over at British Journal of Photography. The man is also very passioned about photojournalism, so it’s great to have him moonlighting here at Photojournalism Links. Olivier will be posting some of the categories, and we are also going to be introducing some original content. More of which in due course. But thou shalt not fear….the site has always been about sharing links to great photojournalism content found online, and that will continue to be the core of Photojournalism Links. But I do believe everything has to evolve to stay fresh, and I think that along with changing the way links are posted, providing some original content is the natural next step. So stay tuned….

But now to the links….

Don’t mean to always start with NatGeo links, but cannot not share these two National Geographic Magazine June issue features right off the bat as they were only put online yesterday…Especially liking the Harvey one…Looking forward to getting the June issue in the post very soon…

David Alan Harvey: North Carolina’s Outer Banks (NGM)

Mark Leong: Hong Kong – In China’s Shadow (NGM)

Seen Martin Roemers’s World Press Photo prize winning series published many times, recently also in Time Int’l, but always worth having a look again…. here’s the series from
New York Times’ Sunday Review…

Martin Roemers: Metropolis (NYT)

Two Tomas Munita series from NYT, obviously much shorter assignments than the above NGM pieces and Roemers’s project, but both with such great openers….

Tomas Munita: Honduras Becomes the Focal Point in America’s Drug War (NYT)

Tomas Munita: A Dam Clouds The Future of Peru’s Indigenous People (NYT)

Different variations of boxing have always been a popular subject for photojournalists, to the extent, you can sometimes go, ‘not a again’, after seeing one (A picture editor once remarked to me in discussion about possible topics: ” Just don’t do a project about boxing.”), but every now and then a new boxing series comes up, that you cannot but enjoy..Like this one…

Devin Yalkin: Blood, Sweat, and Illicit Bets (NYT)

Meridith Kohut: Life Inside a Brothel in Cartagena, Colombia (NYT)

Several photographers have tackled topics around Central and South American immigration to the United States  in recent years (for instance Redondo and Orlinsky come to mind), but Joseph Rodriguez’s treatment is right up the with the best, certainly one of the most long-term and intimate, I’ve seen… Hope he manages to make this into a book like he plans…

Joseph Rodriguez: Life on Both Sides of the Border (NYT Lens)

Ed Ou: Camel-Jumpers in Yemen (NYT Lens)

Bryan Denton: Afghan Soldiers Increasingly Attack American Counterparts (NYT)

Blast from the past… The below Okahara’s series is probably couple of years old, so was surprised to see it posted on NYT website… But worth seeing again…such strong work it is…and this is actually multimedia..

Kosuke Okahara: Ibasyo (NYT) multimedia

Tyler Hicks: Moto-Polo (NYT)

Mathieu Young: Illegal Logging in Cambodia (NYT Lens)

Ian Bates: Growing Up Lost in Appalachia (NYT Lens)

Jen Davis: Seeing Yourself as Others Do (NYT Lens)

Mary Beth Meehan: Immigrants in Brockton (NYT Lens)

Rian Dundon: Changsha, China (NYT)

Jiri Makovec: Unique View of New York (NYT Lens)

Really terrific set by Peter Muller…

Pete Muller: Inside South Sudan (Lightbox)

Dominic Nahr: Divided Sudan (Lightbox)

Christopher Morris: Men in Black (Lightbox)

Rian Dundon: City on Fire: A Look Inside Changsha in China (Lightbox)

David Guttenfelder: A New Look at North Korea (Lightbox)

Joakim Eskildsen: Home Works (Lightbox)

Carl de Keyzer: Moments Before the Flood (Lightbox) Series on Magnum website

Jeffrey Stockbridge: Neighborhood Blues: Kensington: Philadelphia (Lightbox)

Shaul Schwarz: One Morning at Home with John Irving (Lightbox) video

Steve Rubin: Vacationland: Rural Maine Chronicled (Lightbox)

Isadora Kosofsky : Senior Love Triangle (Lightbox)

Tom Stoddart: South Sudan (Reportage)

Justyna Mielnikiewicz: City of Women (Reportage)

Christian Holst: Myanmar’s HIV and AIDS Epidemic (Reportage)

Alvaro Ybarra Zavala: Alzheimer’s in Colombia (Reportage)

Jon Tonks: The Empire (Reportage)

Ed Kashi: Pretrial Justice in Brazil (VII)

Adam Ferguson: Myanmar in Transition (VII)

Lynsey Addario: The Criminalization of Bad Mothers (VII)

Jessica Dimmock: Jack White (VII)

Sim Chi Yin: Boxing for Burma (VII Mentor)

Giovanni Cocco: Morocco: The Southernmost Border of Europe (VII Mentor)

Giovanni Cocco: Living in Limbo (VII Mentor)

Alex Webb: Havana (Magnum)

Magnum photographers: House of Photos (New Yorker)

Dominic Nahr: Central African Republic, 2012 (Magnum)

Olivia Arthur: Jeddah Diary (Firecracker) Photos on Teleragraph website | article on Telegraph website

Zed Nelson: Hackney (Institute)

Rob Hornstra: Wrestlers (Institute)

Chiara Goia: An Indian Temple’s Golden Secret (New Yorker)

Rena Effendi: The Photographer and The Islamist (New Yorker)

Ben Roberts: Occupied Spaces (New Yorker) The book published by Here Press.

Dominic Bracco II: The Clarinetist : Music in One of the World’s Most Violent Cities (The Smithsonian) video

Alan Chin: Heavy Metal: America’s Tank Factory (Facing Change)

Michael Zumstein: Mangaize Refugee Camp in Niger (Le Monde)

Cedric Gerbehaye: Sudan in Transition (Pulitzer Center)

Ilan Godfrey: Legacy of the Mine (GUP)

Went to the Slideluck Potshow London the other week. You can see all the projected slideshows here. My favourite piece of the night..

Paul S. Amundsen: A Memoir of a Boy (photographer’s website)

Kate Holt: Emerald Valley (zReportage)

Stephen Morton: Making a Marine (zReportage)

Delmi Alcarez: The Crossing Point (zReportage)

Robin Nelson: No Labels Please (zReportage)

Sim Chi Yin: Waiting for Justice in Beijing (Newsweek)

Peter DiCampo: Cocoa in the Shade of War (BloombergBusinessweek)

Peter DiCampo: Night Vision (Foreign Policy)

Charles Ommanney: The Composition of the Secret Service (CNN)

Jon Lowestein: Gang Violence and Crime in Chicago (Newsweek)

Julia Dermansky: Detroit’s Otherwordly Decay (The Atlantic)

Dana Popa: After the New Man (Foto8)

Diana Markosian: Goodbye My Chechnya (Foto8)

Djamila Grossman: The Moons (Foto8)

Finbarr O’Reilly: Sierra Leone Architecture (Reuters)

Finbarr O’Reilly: Sierra Leone, 10 Years After (NYT Lens)

Ben Roberts: Africa’s Premier Ski Resort (photographer’s website)

Kael Alford: Erosion of a Way of Life (CNN)

Andrea Bruce: Women and the Revolution (NOOR)

William Daniels: In the Line of Fire (Panos)

Chloe Dewe Mathews: One Man and His Zoo (Panos)

Ivan Kashinsky: Let a Hundred Flowers Bloom (Panos)

Anders Petersen: Soho, London (Guardian)

Sophie Evans: Noble Ladies (The Observer)

Chloe Borkett: Stories East of the River (Telegraph)

Hazel Thompson: Mumbai Sexslaves (Politiken)

Lucy Nicholson: South Los Angeles, 20 Years After Rodney King Riots (Globe and Mail)

Brian Cassey: The Dogs of Sai Kung (Fotostrada)

Mustafah Abdulaziz: The Music Scene in Berlin (CNN)

Christian Stejskal: Zabbaleen (Cargo Collective)

Gianni Cipriano: Where Beauty Softens Your Grief (Photo Raw)

UPDATED: Robert Capa, Friend of Anton

Neil Harris

The first lot is auctioned off at the ‘Friends of Anton’ benefit.

UPDATE: In the first lot of the evening, the framed Robert Capa print pictured above sold for $4,500 to bidder #313, reports TIME’s Neil Harris, who was present at the event. He says that the evening was partly surprising—contemporary photojournalism at Christie’s is unprecedented—and partly somber, as Hammerl’s widow gave a speech and read a letter from their middle child to his father. Once the live auction began, “the mood became quite energized and people started bidding real money for serious pictures,” Harris says. “The first three lots together broke $10,000, which was exhilarating on all levels.”

On Tuesday evening, Christie’s will hold its first-ever auction of contemporary photojournalism prints at its New York City auction house. The event, which will be hosted by news anchor Christiane Amanpour, will benefit the family of the late Anton Hammerl. Hammerl, who had been a photographer and photo editor for outlets from the Associated Press to the The Sunday Star in Johannesburg, was killed in Libya last April. He had traveled to Libya as a freelancer to cover the conflict in that country. He was 41 years old and had three children, ages 11, 8 and 1. His remains have not yet been found.

The auction was the idea of a group of conflict journalists who originally got together, via Facebook, to sell prints to help their colleague’s loved ones. The transition from on-demand sales to planning an auction, under the banner “Friends of Anton,” happened about a month ago, and some of the most recognizable names in photojournalism have signed on to participate: João Silva, Platon, Bruce Davidson, Alec Soth, Susan Meiselas and many more.

The auction, says David Brabyn, one of the organizers, demonstrates the sense of community among photographers who put themselves at risk for their work. “It’s been quite highlighted recently,” he says, “after all the deaths of reporters, both photographers and print.”

But one of the most important prints up for bid was not a donation from someone in that community. Robert Capa’s photograph of American soldiers landing in France on D-Day is perhaps the most familiar picture in the bunch; Capa was killed by a land mine in 1954. The donation comes from the International Center of Photography, where his work is archived. (The winning bid will also include a personal tour of his archive.) ICP was founded by Capa’s brother, Cornell Capa, and the print comes from his personal collection.

Even though neither Capa brother is alive to bestow his friendship on Anton Hammerl, it’s a fitting donation, says Cynthia Young, curator of the Robert Capa Archive at ICP. Cornell Capa, she says, was generous with his prints during his lifetime—and this is a particularly poignant cause. “His brother and Anton both died while photographing overseas, doing a job they felt compassionately about. They were both committed to bringing back real stories about what was happening in the world and what they saw,” says Young. “Cornell founded ICP in part to educate people, not only about photography, but that through photography we can learn about political situations, and consequently make social and political change.”

And the picture, beyond its historical significance, has its own measure of poignancy, she adds: “It seemed like an appropriate image, one of great courage both on the part of the American soldiers and of the photographer.”

More information about the Friends of Anton auction—including ticketing and absentee bidding information—is available here.