Tag Archives: Photography World

Guest Blogger – Join Hotshoe Blog discussing creativity over on the World Photography Organisation Blog

Today and for the next few Wednesdays, I’ll be guest blogging over at the World Photography Organisation Blog starting with my first post, Creativity and Photography: Partners in Time. To whet your appetite, I’ve included the intro from the post.

To read more and see the full post, click on the link above in bold.

“In order to create, we have to stand in that space between what we see in the world, and what we hope for…” Julie Burstein, TED talk.

“Creativity lies at the heart of producing any photographic or artistic work. But it is not limited to these areas, it exists everywhere. I believe that we all have that potential to be creative within us, we just need to find the space and opportunities to allow ourselves to be open and free to play. For my first post on the WPO blog, I want to share some ideas with you about creativity in the hope that you all feel inspired to go forward and create…”

Filed under: Photographers, Photographers blogs Tagged: creativity, Julie Burstein, Miranda Gavin, Photography, World Photography Organisation

Peter Liepke

It’s not a secret that I love all things New York City.  When Jay Z’s Empire State of Mind comes on the radio, it sends me right back to those years of feeling like everything was possible when I strode down Fifth Avenue.  And today’s post on Peter Liepke’s terrific work brings me back to that feeling of complete adoration for the Big Apple. Here’s hoping it weathers hurricane Sandy safely.

Peter Liepke creates New York images that feel like charcoal drawings, timeless in their appeal and magical in their effect.

Peter was born St. Louis Park, Minnesota.  In 1979 he moved from Minneapolis to Los Angeles to attend Art Center and later opened an advertising photography studio in Los Angeles. His client roster included Chiat/Day, Daily &Assoc, J Walter Thompson, American Honda, Sunkist, FTD. After the 1987 Los Angeles earthquake, Peter decided to move to New York City, and in 1988 reinvented himself as a fine art portraitist. Peter resides in upstate New York with his wife, and two sons. His articles and  photographs have been published in PHOTOGRAPHIS, GRAPHIS Showcase, Photo District News, Town & Country, B&Wmagazine, The Photo Review, View Camera, Silvershots , The Book of Alternative Processes and numerous other publications.

 My series “ABOVE & BEYOND” is the most ambitious fine art project I’ve done to date since leaving the commercial photography world. The images shown here are only a small portion of the entire project. The series is still very much in production, and when completed will comprise at least 40 images or more.

The inspiration comes from a city that I love, where I met my wife, and where many artists from around the country still flock to today. 

Some of my collectors have said that perhaps it might be my own personal and visual love letter to New York City. I suppose maybe that’s partly true in a small way, but for me it’s much more than just that or showing “pretty pictures”. To me the series is much more about breaking away and chasing a dream. After growing up in suburban Minnesota…as an artist, like many before me, and many more who will continually arrive in NYC each day, we embrace the challenge of wanting to broaden our lives by moving into a bigger arena. So for this series I wanted to go back and try to remember my feelings or first impressions upon arriving in NYC as an outsider for the first time well over twenty years ago.

 It’s easy to be overwhelmed by the noise, and feel isolated or lonely despite being surrounded by a sea of humanity. It’s much more difficult to look beyond that which is what I chose to do then, and now. As I continue to seek out, explore, and experience my own sense of place, the reality becomes clear that each of us are small but very valuable individual pieces of a much larger jigsaw puzzle. 

My vision for illustrating the project is the challenge of looking beyond the gritty streets by depicting an urban atmosphere with beauty, utilizing a more intimate cinematic approach engaging the viewer, as opposed to the current more popular trend in contemporary photography of massive sized prints overly saturated with color. The series when completed, will total at least 40 images or more culminating in to a published book, 3 different editions of small handmade platinum palladium collector portfolios, a special photogravure edition, and large limited edition of framed prints all sold and distributed through my galleries.

Kate Orne

I first became aware of Kate Orne’s photographs when she won the Berenice Abbott Prize for her work with sex trade workers in Pakistan. The series, Brothels and Fundamentalism, captured poignant and powerful images of women trapped in a lifestyle of abuse and fear was deeply felt and appreciated.

Kate is a unique voice in the photography world. She is an editorial and fashion photographer (see image below), a documentary photographer, a fine art photographer, and a humanitarian. In 2002, she created MyFarAwayFamily.com, an organization providing Afghan refugee children with education and their widowed mothers with micro loans and guidance to start their own businesses. Provided food distributions in Kabul and Peshawar among refugees. And she’s one hell of a nice person.

Kate was born in Sweden, and now lives in New York City. One of her first jobs was as an editor for Interview Magazine, but by the mid 1990’s Kate was busy working in all areas of the photo landscape. And within that landscape, she has created a new body of fine art work that is just about that: landscape, but landscape as meditation and inspiration.

The Landscape With: As far back as I can remember, I have been drawn to the wide-open landscape: a canvas of land, water or sky where I feel expansion within and around me. In that setting, my mind is free.

Over the years, I have frequently returned to the landscape, on assignment and for personal work. I’m rarely shooting in a place where there are people – I don’t want them interrupting the pull of natural elements. As I look through the viewfinder, I wait. A shadow, a shape, or some interplay or tension between forms, sparks my curiosity, calling for attention. This is a starting point.

To me art is a form of meditation. In the time when we create, we travel inward. When I photograph, I want to include as much of what is there as possible—both what I can see and feel. My intuition guides the process – a secret language within me, which I regard as the most valuable measurement of honesty. This is what my heart sees.

The feelings that I experience are powerful and the image afterwards brings me back to them. It’s often during the edit, when I look closely at a photograph, that I see what in the landscape captured my attention.

I want it to be the same for the viewers, for them to feel free and have their minds and hearts expand when they rest their eyes on an image. This is why I prefer my work printed on a larger scale, creating a space that invites the viewer inside.

Kevin Van Aelst

Kevin Van Aelst brings to the photography world a curiosity, a sense of humor, and a new way of looking a everyday objects. I can imagine him as a little boy, in bed a night looking around his room, his imagination allowing him to create new worlds within the familiar. You may recognize his work from his weekly illustrations for The Medium in the New York Times Magazine from 2007 – 2011, or from the pages of such publications as Scientific American, Men’s Health, Money Magazine, Wired, and Time. To see his work on gallery walls, Kevin will open an exhibition at the Panopticon Gallery in Boston on January 12th running through February 28th.

Apple Globe, 2007

He currently lives and works in New Haven, Connecticut, but grew up in Elmira, New York and central Pennsylvania. He recieved a B.A. in Psychology from Cornell University and an M.F.A. from the University of Hartford. Kevin is currently is teaching at Quinnipiac University and ACES/Educational Center for the Arts High School Program. He is a recipient of a 2008 fellowship grant from the Connecticut Commission on Culture and Tourism.

Legos, 2011

My artwork is an attempt to reconcile my physical surroundings with the fears, fascinations, curiosities, and daydreams occupying my mind. The photographs and constructions consist of common artifacts, materials, and scenes from everyday life, which have been rearranged and reassembled into various forms, patterns, and illustrations. The images aim to examine the distance between where my mind wanters to and the material objects that inspire those fixations. Equally important to this work are the ‘big picture’ and the ‘little things’–the mundane and relatable artifacts of our daily lives, and the more mysterious notions of life and existence. This work is about creating order where we expect to find randomness, and also hints that the minutiae all around us is capable of communicating much larger ideas.

Elsewhere, 2009

Tragedies, 2009

Ursa Major, 2010

The Ocean, 2010

The Moon, 2010

In Search of Perfect States, 2010

Blue Tape, 2009

If Wishes were Fishes, 2009

Digestive System, 2009

Common Clouds, 2007

Cemetery, 2010

The Heart, 2009

Dress Code, 2011

Heidi Kirkpatrick

The photography world is hungry for new approaches to creating imagery as our current photographic environment speaks more to pixels and file sizes. Happily, there is a rebirth of exploring traditional and historical processes and a focus on the photograph as object. Heidi Kirkpatrick is creating three dimensional photographic sculptures after years in the darkroom producing traditional silver gelatin prints, that were, more often than not, tucked away in boxes. In an effort to work in a unique way, her photographs have found new homes and surfaces and they are getting lots of attention. Heidi will be giving a presentation on her work at the Portland Art Museum, as a part of their Brown Bag Lunch Talks, on January 18, 2012 at 12:00pm to 1:00pm. Her series, Specimens, was recently recognized as one of the Critical Mass Top 50 Portfolios. The image below was selected by Darius Himes for the traveling Critical Mass exhibition.

Branch ll

The two images below were selected by gallerist Deborah Klomp Ching for the New Directions exhibition at Wall Space Gallery, that opened January 1st and will run through January 29th.

Reveal

For Fredrerick

Specimens: I have had a lot of physical pain and have for many years. In my continual search for an answer, as well as my way of dealing with the unexplained, I dissect my Gray’s Anatomy book. The pages find their way into Specimens, layered under images of those closest to me. The illustrations bind, clothe and wrap the body. Putting the inside on the outside, I wear my heart on my sleeve. Reminiscent of nineteenth century cased images; Specimens are housed in small hinged tins that open and close to reveal or conceal the secrets they hold.

Heidi is a Portland photographer and artist, using found objects to create intimate and personal sculptures. Her work is mysterious, personal, and nostalgic. She explores themes of family, childhood, addiction, and pain. There is a sense of play present, but serious play that makes the viewer consider their own memories and insights. She has a book of her work, Lost and Found, through Blurb. The work below is gleaned from several series.

I am in love with film. All of my work is made with film. I shoot on film. I print on film. I do all of my own work in my darkroom. I like it dripping off my elbows. I do not use a lot of fancy equipment. My “models” are the people who are closest to me, my family and friends. I love layering the film positives over anything and everything I can think of or find. My studio is filled with found objects that inspire me, and photographs, lots and lots of photographs.

I use photographs to transform found objects into playful pieces of art. Fusing transparent figurative and family portraits with children’s toys and blocks, I create a playful tension between imagery and object. My work breathes new life into these found objects, yet they leave hints of the past in their lovingly worn appearances; the flecks of paint missing, and the soft corners worn down by tiny fingers and tumbling towers.

These works depart from the formality of a frame as they are arranged on a table top or a shelf, often stacked or placed side by side to reveal narratives of family snapshots, or the complexities of the feminine allure. In combination, I give you a chance to visit these earlier playful times while drawing on memories, contemporary issues, and visual formality.

Brave New (Photography) World: Octocopters as Cameras

A new breed of octocopter drones is helping photographers, filmmakers and soldiers alike. For the cinema auteur, it can take sky-high video without the hassle or restrictions that come with renting a crane. For the military commander, it can gather reconnaissance on a moment’s notice before being stuffed back into a backpack.

The octocopter developed by Ermes Technologies can fly more than a half-mile into the sky at speeds of up to 42 mph, scanning a battlefield with a camera or infrared sensor for 25 minutes at a time. It can be piloted via remote control or even fly itself automatically, allowing for the recording of image stills that a photographer couldn’t capture.

Of course, fixed-wing drones have been helping soldiers in the field for a long time. The hand-launched RQ-11B Raven has more than six year’s experience capturing color and infrared video in Iraq and Afghanistan. The 4.2 lb drone costs more than $170,000, out of reach for most people without military funding. Elsewhere, the CineStar 8 kit, sold by the Montana-based company Quadrocopter, retails for a much more reasonable $3,649. Filmmakers love drones like the CineStar 8 because their eight rotors give the machines excellent stability to ensure blur-free shots. A budding Steven Spielberg just needs to hook up whatever camera he or she wants, from a typical DSLR to a high-end video camera, and let the octocopter fly.

In October, Berlin-based media production company OMStudios  released a video of its own DIY octocopter carrying a RED Epic camera—the same $58,000 device recently utilized by directors such as Peter Jackson and James Cameron—in a move that demonstrates that drones originally meant for the battlefield may benefit photographers and image makers, too.

Keith Wagstaff is a contributor to TIME’s Techland blog. Follow him on Twitter at @Kwagstaff.

Photographer #371: Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm

Anuschka Blommers and Niels Schumm, both 1969, the Netherlands, met while studying at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. Since graduating they work as a team on fashion, portrait and still-life photography. In 1997 they were asked by fashion designers Viktor & Rolf to shoot for Purple magazine. The result launched them into the fashion photography world. As this was a discipline they did not feel comfortable with, they started to play with the conventions of fashion and photography. It lead to a unique approach, often using friends as models as they were more interested in the person than the clothing. The hyper-real photographs were revolutionary in which identity and desire played important roles. In 2006 they released the book Anita and 124 other portraits, showing a collection of their work between 1996 and 2006. The portraits are presented alphabetically, creating unexpected combinations. They have been published in numerous books and catalogues as well as many of the leading fashion magazines. The following images come from various shoots within their portfolio.

Website: www.blommers-schumm.com

Photographer #371: Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm

Anuschka Blommers and Niels Schumm, both 1969, the Netherlands, met while studying at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. Since graduating they work as a team on fashion, portrait and still-life photography. In 1997 they were asked by fashion designers Viktor & Rolf to shoot for Purple magazine. The result launched them into the fashion photography world. As this was a discipline they did not feel comfortable with, they started to play with the conventions of fashion and photography. It lead to a unique approach, often using friends as models as they were more interested in the person than the clothing. The hyper-real photographs were revolutionary in which identity and desire played important roles. In 2006 they released the book Anita and 124 other portraits, showing a collection of their work between 1996 and 2006. The portraits are presented alphabetically, creating unexpected combinations. They have been published in numerous books and catalogues as well as many of the leading fashion magazines. The following images come from various shoots within their portfolio.

Website: www.blommers-schumm.com