Tag Archives: Photography Magazine

Guest Blogger 5 – Forward Thinking: Hotshoe looks ahead to 2013 on the World Photography Organisation blog

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Hotshoe covers from 1980s to present day

For my final guest post before Christmas at the World Photo Organisation and to mark the end of the year and the start of a new one, I asked the team at Hotshoe magazine to look ahead to 2013, rather than back at 2012, to comment on any trends in the world of photography and to pick out some up-coming events, photographers and works to look out for.

If you ever wondered who we were and about the history of this independent publication (first published in 1979) then follow this link Forward Thinking for some photos, comments and photos. There’s also a pre-Christmas competition to win a year’s subscription to Hotshoe magazine, just LIKE Hotshoe International Facebook page this week, see the end of the WPO post for details.

Enjoy the run up to the holidays and here’s wishing you all a healthy, happy holiday.

Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers Tagged: Bill Kouwenhoven, Gregory Barker, Hotshoe International Contemporary photography magazine, Hotshoe iPad app, Melissa Dewitt, Miranda Gavin

MacdonaldStrand

All images © MacdonaldStrand

Brad Feuerhelm considers the participatory aspects and iconic violence in Most Popular of All Time, a new book by MacdonaldStrand.

Having picked up the latest self-published title from husband and wife team MacdonaldStrand (Clare Strand and Gordon Macdonald), I have come away with a greater sense of what photographic practice can bring about when disseminated through the line of the pencil, darkly. As photography becomes more and more synonymous with that of conceptual art practice, the mantra of the iconic within the medium begins to permeate a greater need for understanding for our own associations with images that take on a totemic value. A photograph with ‘iconic status’ is an instantly recognised yet sometimes little understood visual cadence that explodes across the world in daily consummation of news and media alike. How do we recognise, process, receive, and finally retransmit its symbolic value over time? How do we train our minds to adhere to a group formula for understanding these visual markers of progress and detriment? And finally, how to we reinterpret this material and send it back out into the world to promote its niche capacity for several understandings within the visual language of the time – past, present, and future?
The works contained within the superb Most Popular of All Time invoke such questions. The project results from an online survey conducted by the artist/curator duo, whereby users were asked to name their most iconic images. These photographs have become so ubiquitous that it is hard to see their content and they have become detached from their context.From the information gathered, MacdonaldStrand took the resulting images and reduced them to line drawings with ‘connect-the-dot’ numbered points. Left half-finished, the image is then to be completed by the further drawing on the part of the viewer.
All colour is drained, all traces of photographic grey scale removed. It is a simple yet effective conceit to reduce photography to that of line, but also embedded within the work is the ability to promote the ‘punctum’ of its iconic status with a participatory function – it brings the viewer into a complicit rendering of line and photographic management of iconic status.
Within the works selected for re-purposing are Eddie Adams famous ‘execution’ image and Richard Drew’s Falling Man. These pictures in and of themselves capture very difficult conditions of humanity and the role of observer within. The majority of the images displayed are of a horrific base and coalesce our need to exult difficult imagery into that of lore and legend, that of description and representation which is often fraught with a tension not found in other mediums. In short, they are epic tales of pleasure and pain, ecstasy and absence.
Yet representation is not the exclusive aim within the book nor the works themselves, but rather they evoke a need to understand how we as a collective society enable these icons caught on film (or file) and how we redistribute their meaning and function as the photograph itself. The structures of violence, the poignantly horrific, and the sometimes misunderstood signifiers of our collective photographic imagination delineated by the direct act of hand on paper.
The works are also available for an incredibly economic rate, which is also clever given the material. I have purchased all images within the show for less than £100. But in doing so I understand what exactly it is I am enabling. MacdonaldStrand have chosen a crafty and intelligent way to examine and exclude some of the icons of photography through something as commonplace as a pencil. Time and the flow of chaos have been reduced to the materially manageable. 

Brad Feuerhelm

William Klein + Daido Moriyama @Tate Modern, London

Fresh from the media view of the hugely anticipated Klein + Moriyama: New York Tokyo Photography Film exhibition, which opens today at the Tate Modern, Rachel Ridge reports back on her findings and brings us a quick q&a with Daido Moriyama. Also, after the drop, are two of latest of Art.sy/Tate Shots videos.

Klein + Moriyama: New York Tokyo Film Photography is the latest in a recent rupture of thoughtfully curated photography coming out of the Tate Modern. And, following the likes of Diane Arbus, Boris Mikhailov and the 2010 show Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and The Camera, it appears to have a penchant for the candid wanderers of the world.  
So here we have two connoisseurs of the street in what is essentially two retrospectives back to back. It begins with American painter, filmmaker, and photographer William Klein (b.1928), and ends with Daido Moriyama, (b.1938). The story goes that a twenty year old Moriyama stumbled upon Klein’s seminal photo book, Life is Good and Good For You in New York, published in 1956, a daringly stark portrait of New York, which would go on to change the way he photographed from then on.
These are men who see the city as a mysterious world, that births a strange kind of existence filled with stark realities, performance, isolation, desires and nervous energy. Both shooting predominantly New York and Tokyo in black and white with a point and shoot, they seem to subsume street photography into their own brand of photographic impressionism. Quick to capture what grabbed them, their images had little time for technical expertise and appear more like throbs of instinctive impulse, that often dissolve into abstraction.
The show literally opens with a bang, with Klein’s film Broadway Light 1958, towering over you in pulsating neon flashes which cut to close ups of garish street signs, ‘Don’t walk’ and ‘Taste it’. Klein explores the city as cinema, a phantasmagoria, lulling us into a waking dream state. His work appears to be an intense investigation into these wheels of control and seduction.

Elsa Maxwell’s Tory ball, Waldorf Hotel, New York, 1955. © William Klein


An interesting paradox is his heavy involvement in the fashion industry, working as a photographer for Vogue in his early career. We see enlarged pictures of models head to toe in designer clothing parading the gritty streets of New York, and a satire of the fashion industry in the film, Who are you Polly Magoo? which plays in a room looping a retrospective of his films. It’s quite hard to believe how he got away with poking fun at fashion, whilst at the same time, changing the face of it forever. In his most creative fashion endeavour he mixes photographs of models with photograms showing them interacting with moving light.
There is an inherent urgency about Klein’s practice that speaks to some kind of post war hysteria; rooms of abstract paintings, photograms, films then back to photography. A man on a manic quest for his own truth and always trying to break down the façade, he even does this with the photograph itself in huge blown up photo laminates of painted contact sheets unveiling the selection process for all to see. Laying things as bare as he can, the American dream seems to shatter slightly every time Klein clicks. The war may have been over but a new one was being waged.
The mania of Klein’s rooms pave the way for Moriyama to adopt a more sensual approach, where Klein is the rampant explorer, Moriyama, ten years his junior, is the flaneur letting his intuition lead.

Memory of Dog 2, 1982. © Daido Moriyama

Moriyama, born in Osaka but later settling in Tokyo, seems to be trying to make sense of these fragmented places, which the city poses. His democracy of vision renders real-artificial, human-animal, subject-photographer, inanimate object-nature all equal, all up for investigation. His photographs are where pre conceptions go to die. The city is merely a plethora of possibilities and he is open to them all. In the series Platform he captures different groups of people waiting for the train. We see a businessman, a granny and a housewife all coexisting on an equal plane, all having a story we can get lost in.
Moriyama’s influence, Jack Kerouac’s On the road, can be seen in the countless open-ended narratives that pour onto the walls in a stream of consciousness. Like Kerouac did with writing, Moriyama pushes the limits of photography – shooting grainy, disjointed compositions, overlapping images and over exposing. Photographs become his own subconscious imprints. In Farewell photography we see how Moriyama like Klein, uses personal expressions and distortion of light to remind us of the façade of the photograph.
The curator, Simon Baker, explains this is “a show about photographic architecture”. Staying true to Klein and Moriyama’s love affair with the photo book, the exhibition utilises this in a visually exciting way. There are vitrines full of books, issues of Japanese vintage publication Provoke. The photographs adorn the walls in grids resembling something of a free flowing book etched out on the wall. This, coupled with mammoth sized images and large-scale films create a constant flux of shapes and forms. 
Ultimately, this exhibition is an opportunity to witness how pioneering both were in breaking from the confines of the photograph to create a visual language where perception can roam freely, in turn, producing images that seem to spring from the dark recesses of our imaginations and fantasies.
Rachel Ridge 
Rachel Ridge: Do you see the relationship between you and William Klein? 

Daido Moriyama: Rather than feeling there’s any particular connection with the artist, I feel very happy and very fortunate to be able to share the same space with him. When I was in my twenties and saw Klein photographs of New York it really inspired me to become a photographer and change the way I took photographs myself.

RR: I read that sometimes you don’t look into the viewfinder when you’re shooting; you let your body take the photograph. How much do you rely on instinct and intuition?

DM: Yes. Intuition is very important and the instinct there. Sometimes if you’re in the town you might be looking one direction and you’ll just feel that there’s something happening over there and so you’ll just turn the camera and take a photo in the other direction and that is pure instinct. 

RR: Can you elaborate on how Jack Kerouac’s On the road has influenced your work?

DM: It’s not as though in every shot I take there is a bit of Jack Kerouac or a bit of Andy Warhol. When I was young I was very influenced by seeing their work or reading their work and that has somehow sunk into my subconscious and so it probably is present in all that I do but I’m not very conscious of it when I’m taking the pictures. I can emphasise with them in how they see the world, your basis stance to what’s around you.

RR: So like an intuitive remembering…

DM: It’s intuitive sometimes when you’re actually taking the photo. It can be intuitive what kind of photo you take but at the same time this basic stance to the world around you that’s the base on what you’re standing, so not quite the same as intuition. Through the lens it might be an instinctive motion to take a photo but the whole of my life and memories are acting through that one motion at that time.

Spencer Murphy


All images © Spencer Murphy

Spencer Murphy’s name should ring a bell thanks to his editorial commissions which has seen his photography published in such places as The Guardian Weekend, Telegraph Magazine, New Statesman, and the FT Weekend. He has also been included in the Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize no less than five times!

Here though are extracts from a personal project, a delicate and visually understated series entitled The Abyss Gazes Into You. It offers a gentle and thoughtful glimpse of Murphy’s use of the landscape as inspiration and as a means to discover something within him.

“These images are a reflection of something inside myself – a feeling of both being trapped and floating endlessly in time and space, a mixture of hope and despair, desolation and beauty,” says Murphy.

“The sense, perhaps, of what it is to live a finite life in an infinite universe. They are pictures that, to me, hint at the unfathomable scale not only of the universe, but of life itself. They are instances in which, by accident or design, I have found myself staring once more into the abyss, and the abyss has momentarily returned my gaze.”

Lofty themes and grand claims, but does the work bear the weight of these words? Check out more from the series here and decide for yourselves. We are giving him the benefit of the doubt.

Born in 1978, Murphy grew up in the Kentish countryside and studied photography at University College Falmouth, graduating in 2002. Murphy now lives and works in London.

Rafael Arocha

All images © Rafael Arocha

“Photography keeps me alert,” writes Rafael Arocha by way of introduction to his project entitled Midnight. “The photographic process allows me to critically and creatively understand, and get closer to different situations, feelings and people, learning more about my own thoughts and inner emotions. I believe this process allows the photographer to discover and connect with his/her obsessions, doubts, intellect and memory.”
With more than a whiff of Anders Petersen, this imagery plumbs the heart of grimness. Alive to the presence of human flesh, it looks at the relationship between instinct and desire, where night time is the stage set on which courtship becomes ritualistic. Filtered through his uncompromising lens are scenes, incidents and gestures that become transformed into things of profound and often awkward beauty.
“Midnight refers to a fleeting moment,” Arocha goes on to explain, “a line that divides one moment in time from another. It is then that a transformation happens, a metamorphosis, and an instinctive drive, from deep within, offers us the opportunity to show ourselves as less ordinary. Things happen, sometimes unnoticed, which reflect our own obsessions or fantasies. Non-verbal codes are used to communicate, and once interpreted, they become intimate longing and desire.”
Rafael Arocha was born in 1978, in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria. Click here to view more work from the series. To learn about his practice visit www.rafaelarocha.com

1000 Words Photography Magazine 14

We are delighted to announce that issue 14 of our online magazine is now live. Links backlinks blog comments . To view it, please go to: www.1000wordsmag.com
This issue is dedicated to the memory of Rosina Darch (1924-2012).
For this Autumn edition we have chosen the theme of Murmur. Silent vibrations and fugitive apparitions, the imagery showcased here derives its brilliance in the shape of its understatement, and the art at its core. Artists who translate lived experience into a pattern of photography that preserves its vitality, drawing out psychological complexities and subtleties. They are storytellers, yet their voices are calm, measured and appropriate.
Exploring that which connects and concerns the photography we have brought together, Louise Clements reports back on Eva Stenrams gently feminist exhibition which formed part of The Discovery Award at this years Les Rencontres dArles; also plucked from the French festival is the ethereal and melancholic work of Belarus photographer Alexandra Catiere whose series Here, Beyond The Mists is accompanied by a text from Natasha Christia; Lucy Davies of The Daily Telegraph describes a path through the work of recent RCA graduate Regine Petersen in particular Find a Falling Star, a project about Meteorites and everything; Brad Feuerhelm meets Esther Teichmann and bring us an insightful interview with the German-American artist, looking at the origins of fantasy and desire and how these are bound to experiences of loss and representation.
Elsewhere, Anouk Kruithof serves up a lively (inte)review with the formidable artist duo Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarinon the occasion of their latest photobook, a collection of Polaroids that forms an intimate and imperfect inventory of their fifteen-year collaboration, produced in collaboration with Self Publish Be Happy; and finally, Gerry Badger discusses Paul Grahams The Present, his much anticipated volume which explores both photographys relationship with time, the present, and the nature of photographic narrative, or in this case, with non-narrative.
In our dedicated Books section, David Moore lays bare the facts about Lise Safartis She, Michael Grieve gives his verdict on Soho, the latest in an ongoing series of city studies by Anders Petersen while Brad Feuerhelm ponders the authenticity of Nicholas Comments Mexico City Waltz.

Once again, 1000 thanks to our photographers and writers, editorial and art departments as well as of course our advertisers and funders for making this magazine possible.

Photo News – New issue of revamped Hotshoe App Edition for iPad and iPhone is out now

Great! by Photobooks
Great mag, really like the content, hadn’t seen any of it before, cool design too. Highly recommend

Fantastic! by Jenna Banat
Highly recommend this magazine app – really nice layout, easy to navigate through and fascinating content!
Readers comments from iTunes site


The second edition of the revamped Hotshoe App Edition is out.

Browse all the content from the bi-monthly print edition  showcasing the latest in contemporary photography presented as a curated, interactive experience:

  • Extended portfolios
  • Interactive exhibition listings
  • Text-only function and cutting-edge articles and reviews
  • The latest multimedia pieces from the most exciting photographers around.

Hotshoe’s App Edition is available on your iPad and iPhone from the iTunes store. Download the app for free and then subscribe for one year for just £9.99, and get the latest issue of Hotshoe directly to your device every other month.

Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers, Photography Products, Uncategorized Tagged: bi-monthly, contemporary photography, Hotshoe App Edition, HotShoe magazine

Darek Fortas, Portrait V (Woman from Grocery Shop)

Darek Fortas, Portrait V (Woman from Grocery Shop)

Darek Fortas

Portrait V (Woman from Grocery Shop),
Silesia, Poland, 2011
From the Coal Story series
Website – DarekFortas.com

Darek Fortas (b. 1986 in Zory, Poland) graduated with a Photography BA (Hons) at Dublin Institute of Technology with a First Class Honours Degree and a DIT Medal. His photographs have been exhibited in national and international venues including Aperture Foundation's What Matters Now?, the Belfast Photo Biennial, Photo Ireland Festival, Foto Foyle at Tower Museum, Derry City, the RUA RED Winter Exhibition and The Copper House Gallery, Dublin. His newest project, Coal Story, has been nominated for the Alliance Française 2nd Photography Award and shortlisted by Chris Hammond of MOT International for Claremorris Open Exhibition 2011. He is a founder of Prism Photography Magazine and lives in Dublin, Ireland.