Tag Archives: Photography Images

This Means War: A Look at Conflict Photography

“War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath,” is a huge, tough-minded and very moving new show at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. It lays out the ways cameras have been put to use during 165 years of world wars, undeclared hostilities and barely organized fang baring. Cameras turn out to be the transformer tools of warfare, adaptable as battlefield aids for reconnaissance and surveillance, as peerless instruments of propaganda and, above all, as a means to witness the atrocious facts of war. You may not be able to end war with a camera, but you can do a lot of useful things with one — even tell the truth.

Instead of being organized chronologically, the Houston show suggests that war is better considered as an eternally recurring narrative. It divides its story into chapters, from prewar buildup through postwar remembrances, with wars from all periods combined in each. The weaponry evolves from sabers to torpedoes to rocket-propelled grenades. (For the record, sharpened steel is forever.) The photo equipment changes from 19th century box cameras to cell phones and satellites. But the fundamentals of war — brutality and suffering, grief and self-sacrifice — don’t change much. They haven’t since the first time a caveman figured out how to use a rock.

The main problem for war photography today is image overload. The tidal wave of pictures all around us, with every cell phone adding to the deluge every day, threatens to make even atrocity photos into just more pictures, as morally weightless as the movie stills they so often resemble. For all that, the scores of unforgettable pictures in “War/Photography” make clear that even in a world that contains too many pictures, pictures of war, the best ones, still have the power to stir your emotions. They may not be able to compel any particular judgment about the wars they represent, but they can insist that attention must be paid. After that, if photos by themselves can’t stop war — and they can’t — then the fault is not in our pictures but in ourselves.

(MORE: Read more of Richard Lacayo’s take on the show.)


WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston until Feb. 3 and will then move to Los Angeles, Washington and Brooklyn.

Richard Lacayo is an art critic and editor-at-large at TIME.



Tearsheet of The Day | Yuri Kozyrev photo of Saddam’s ‘rat hole’ in FT Weekend

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, unveiled their survey of war photography, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath, on Armistice Day yesterday. The FT Weekend magazine featured some of the work from the exhibition in their latest issue. You can view the FT article and slideshow here.  You can also read about the show over at Photo District News, which interviewed the exhibition’s curators.

Below war in Iraq photograph from 2003 by Yuri Kozyrev, which FT Weekend ran as a double truck.

p. 20-21. FT Weekend Magazine. November 10/11 2012 issue.
Photo © Yuri Kozyrev.
“A journalist climbs out of the hole where toppled dictator Saddam Hussein was captured in Ad Dawr. Iraq’s defeated leader raised his arms out of his ‘rat hole’ and said he was Saddam Hussein and that he wanted to negotiate. “ Iraq. December 15, 2003. Inkjet print.

Yuri Kozyrev (Russian, b. 1963) is a member of Noor Images and a contract photographer with Time magazine.

Re Runs: Andrew Sanderson

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Andrew Sanderson that ran in 2009.


Andrew Sanderson has been a professional photgrapher for over two decades and “has established an international reputation as both teacher and practitioner of the photographic medium.” He’s also an author of three books, Night Photography, Hand Colouring and Alternative Darkroom Processes, and Home Photography. His articles can be found in magazines such as AG, Camera and Creative Photography, Photo Art International, and Black and White Magazine UK. He also has a blog, The Darkroom.

Andrew has an uncanny abililty create timeless images, where one finds difficulity in pinpointing they decade they reflect. He is an Ilford master printer, is recognized as the leading practitioner of the paper negative process and one of the world’s best hand colorists, and well known for his night photography.

Images from Night
Images from Children

Summer Re-Runs: Arlene Gottfried

Summer Re-Runs…this post first ran in October 2009…

After photographing the denizens of New York for the last 40 years, Arlene Gottfried must feel like she’s seen everything NYC has to offer. She travels from Harlem to Coney Island, not just as an observer, but as a participant and champion. For her series and book, The Eternal Light, Arlene discovered the Eternal Light Community Singers in an abandoned gas Station on the Lower East side. Eventually, she joined the choir and became an intregal part of the Jerriese Johnson East Village Choir. For her series, Midnight, Arlene documented a nightclub dancer through his journey of schizophenia, and remained his friend and confidant for 20 years. The most recent book, Sometimes Overwhelming, was published in 2007, with images from the 70’s and 80’s, and showcases New York at it’s most outrageous, during the disco era–from the beaches of Coney Island to the West Village on Halloween.

Born in Brooklyn, Arlene graduated from the Fashion Institute of Technology and then began freelancing as a photographer for The New York Times Magazine, Fortune, Life, and The Independent in London. Eventually her personal work found it’s way into a myriad of museum collections and exhibitions. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the Berenice Abbott International Competition of Women’s Documentary Photography.

Images by ©Arlene Gottfriend

Gregory Jones

When Gregory Jones shared his new project, Los Angeles, I experienced a bit of deja vu.  His photographs were transversing many of the same streets I travel on a daily basis and what may be a road trip for him, was unfortunately a reality for me.  These are images created with a disposable camera in preparation for a long term project.

After graduating from the Rochester Institute of Technology with a BFA in Fine Art Photography, Gregory received an artist residency in Bejing, China, currently he is working as the co-editor of the terrific Urbanautica Magazine  and working on his fine art photography.


Images from Los Angeles

Los Angeles, 2011In the Fall of 2011 I drove from
Rochester, NY to Los Angeles. where I spent three weeks working on the
first part of a long-term project. This isn’t the project.

When I left for my trip, I brought along about two dozen cheap disposable cameras. My intent with these was to make pictures that went against my normal formal style, and to make pictures that could most resemble pure documentation.

These pictures were made on the streets and highways of Los Angeles, as I drove around looking for places to make pictures.

Vojtech V. Slama

Tonight, a not-to-be-missed exhibition opens at the Klompching Gallery in Brooklyn, showcasing two wonderful talents, the amazing Ken Rosenthal, and brilliant Vojtech V. Slama. I featured Ken’s work on Lenscratch recently, but was not familiar with the work of Vojtech. His Silver Bromide prints from his series Wolf’s Honey, are surreal, layered, evocative, and timeless. I am now a fan.

A Czech photographer, Vojtech received his degree from the Institute of Creative Photography at Silesian University, Opava, Czech Republic. His work has been exhibited widely at galleries such as Brno Gallery (Czech Republic), Prague House of Photography (Praha), Fotoforum West (Austria), Photeur Gallery (Germany), Blue Sky Gallery (USA), LEICA GALLERY PRAGUE (Czech Republic), Centro de la Imgen (Mexico), Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts (Japan) and FotoFest Houston (USA). His work is held in collections, public and private, all over the world.

In 2006, Sláma was one of ten photographers identified as a Fotofest Discoveries of the Meeting Place. His photographs have been reproduced in publications such as Host Magazine, Imago Magazine, Digi Foto and European Photography.

Images from Wolf’s Honey

Vojtech V. Slama

Tonight, a not-to-be-missed exhibition opens at the Klompching Gallery in Brooklyn, showcasing two wonderful talents, the amazing Ken Rosenthal, and brilliant Vojtech V. Slama. I featured Ken’s work on Lenscratch recently, but was not familiar with the work of Vojtech. His Silver Bromide prints from his series Wolf’s Honey, are surreal, layered, evocative, and timeless. I am now a fan.

A Czech photographer, Vojtech received his degree from the Institute of Creative Photography at Silesian University, Opava, Czech Republic. His work has been exhibited widely at galleries such as Brno Gallery (Czech Republic), Prague House of Photography (Praha), Fotoforum West (Austria), Photeur Gallery (Germany), Blue Sky Gallery (USA), LEICA GALLERY PRAGUE (Czech Republic), Centro de la Imgen (Mexico), Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts (Japan) and FotoFest Houston (USA). His work is held in collections, public and private, all over the world.

In 2006, Sláma was one of ten photographers identified as a Fotofest Discoveries of the Meeting Place. His photographs have been reproduced in publications such as Host Magazine, Imago Magazine, Digi Foto and European Photography.

Images from Wolf’s Honey

A Decade of Photography in the Aftermath of 9/11 curated by Ruben Natal-San Miguel

New York photographer and curator, Ruben Natal-San Miguel created a slideshow that was presented in New York City on the evening of 9/11. Ruben’s statement follows, as does the slide show of images.

As a survivor of attacks on Sept 11, 2001 and now a photographer, curator and an influential figure among fine art photography community, I want to celebrate life, commemorate the 10-year anniversary and showcase how photography, as an art media and derivative works, have changed the face of America and the World.

It is a demonstration of how our life, a worldly vision manifested through the use of the photographers lens and accompanied by all the technological advances, has evolved since right after 9/11 until today. water heater repairs Philadelphia . It will reflect the new sensibilities in this art medium, created by the war, the economy and the advances in the technological landscapes. austin criminal lawyer . The exhibition will also highlight some of the most iconic images over the past decade. These photography images over the last 10-years will be on exhibition display via the World Wide Web as a unique virtual gallery and as a special slide/musical presentation to be held at the historical Greenwich House Music School. Let the healing begin!