Tag Archives: Photography Festival

Douglas Ljungkvist, Untitled

Douglas Ljungkvist, Untitled

Douglas Ljungkvist

Untitled,
Ocean Beach, New Jersey, 2011
From the Ocean Beach series
Website – DouglasLjungkvist.com

Douglas Ljungkvist is originally from Goteborg Sweden. He is a self-taught photographer whose work examines places and environments, both public and private. After a long career in sales & marketing Douglas started photographing about eight years ago and full time for the past four. His work has been exhibited at the New York Photo Festival, Hereford Festival, London Street Photography Festival, Bridge Art Fair, and more. In 2011 he was awarded the gold prize at the Px3 Fine Art Book proposal category and participated at Review Santa Fe in 2010. His first monograph, Ocean Beach, will be published in the fall of 2013. He lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Europe Week: Hélène Amouzou

Guest editor, Jacqueline Roberts shares a week of European photographers, today with Hélène Amouzou. A huge thank you to Jacqueline for her insight and efforts.

Hélène Amouzou was born in Togo in 1969, but currently lives in Brussels, Belgium, where she is completing her studies at the Academy of Drawing and Visual Arts of Molenbeek-St-Jean.
Hélène self portraits have been exhibited in Belgium and France. Last year, she presented her work at the photography festival Photoquai 2011, in Paris.

Her book, Entre le papier peint et le mur, is published by Husson Editeur, Belgium.

Jacqueline Roberts writes: Looking at Hélène’s self-portraits I cannot help but wonder whether her evanescent body emerges from the wall or fades into it… torn between two identities, rootless and in transit. “I always have the impression to be traveling” she says. “I am not Togolese, nor Belgian”. In her quest for identity, Hélène puts down her empty suitcase in an equally empty attic… her no man’s land…

When asked about the European photography scene, Hélène says she finds inspiration in and sees American photography as a reference for European photographers. Since the financial crisis, investment in art has dramatically dropped in Europe. Galleries and art collectors are overly cautious nowadays. There is nevertheless great work coming from Europe and if the work is good, there is a way to find some support, even if such support may no longer be financial.

Kate Peters, Noh, Chadian Refugee

Kate Peters, Noh, Chadian Refugee

Kate Peters

Noh, Chadian Refugee,
London, 2011
Website – KatePeters.co.uk

Kate Peters, born Coventry, England in 1980, gained a BA (Hons) in Photography at Falmouth College of Arts, Cornwall in 2002 before moving to London where she is currently based. Her work has been exhibited worldwide and can regularly be seen in publications including Monocle, FT Weekend, The Independent New Review, Guardian Weekend, and The Telegraph. Her portrait of Julian Assange, the founder of Wikileaks, was featured on the cover of TIME magazine in December 2010 and included in the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize exhibition in November 2011. Kate’s first solo exhibition Stranger than Fiction was at the hpgrp Gallery in New York in February 2011. She has participated in numerous group shows including the Format Photography Festival in Derby, UK and the Darmstadter Tage der Fotografie in Germany. Several of her portraits form part of the permanent collection at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Medium Festival: Jamie Johnson

Featuring photographers seen at the Medium Photography Festival in San Diego….
Once in a while, a photographer has that light bulb moment, where they see something in their work they never noticed before, and then they see it again and again and all of a sudden they realize that, without their knowledge, they’ve been building a body of work–in the case of Los Angeles photographer, Jamie Johnson, quite a profound body of work at that.
I’ve known Jamie for many years and she’s the hardest working photographer I know.  Jamie has a family and children portrait business that keeps her busy seven days a week, year round, but one month out of every year, she explores a part of the world, often on her own, where she leaves the “platinum pacifiers of Bel Air” behind and refreshes her appreciation of humanity.
She has won awards from Prix De La Photographie Paris , Women in Photography International, the Gold Award at Color Magazine and shown at The Fowler Museum in Los Angeles, amongst many exhibitions across the country and online. 
One World 

I cover many terrains as a photographer. I work as an editorial and portrait photographer with an emphasis on family and children portraiture, I am drawn to the simple quality of just being in the world. A simple passion that lured me to travel around the globe and I make work as a way of exploring other cultures. With no particular direction, my two worlds suddenly became one. It started with an instant of recognition, of familiarity of a gesture, an expression, or a person, and I began to see that we are much more one world, than individuals. 

I began to see clearly that we are all experiencing the same joy, the same sorrow, the same routines, the same commitment to family and I began to see the universality of being human. My series, One World, features two photographs, captured years apart without any connection to the other image. The surprising similarities within images that I have been creating over the years, speaks a powerful truth and lesson about who we are.

Medium Festival: Catherin Colaw

Featuring photographers seen at the Medium Photography Festival in San Diego….


I have to admit, I’m not always a fan of the nude, but when the nudes are self-portraits, and the photographer is working alone in a variety of exposed environments that create an incredible venerability for her safety and sanity, it’s hard not to appreciate the results. Catherin Colaw considers her self-portraiture an exploration of women and their bodies and an individual performance done in the environment–and I think she has successfully achieved the conversation between body and place.

Catherin received her BFA from Arizona State University. Her work has been exhibited in galleries on both coasts and the desert in between. She has lived and worked in Arizona, New York City,
and now San Diego.

 

Original Sin

These images are an exploration of sexuality and nakedness, vulnerability and separateness. A women’s identity is sacred and yet it is often stripped down and defined by her bare body. In this series, nudity is no longer about sexuality, but about vulnerability. Each image is a self-portrait and a meditative practice. They are performances that require a challenging stillness and trust. The dismemberment of the nude women’s body becomes a simultaneously beautiful and oppressive dialogue between the landscape and the female form.

Medium Festival: Amanda Dahlgren

Featuring photographers seen at the Medium Photography Festival in San Diego….

It was a pleasure to meet Amanda Dahlgren at the Medium Festival and discover that she is a photographic educator, designer, technician, and craftsman, but above all, she is a photographic artist who has always been fascinated with aesthetics and artistic expression. She brought two projects to the Medium Festival, both looking at how the the housing boom and recent recession have affected areas in Southern California .  I was struck by her series, Pre-Abandonded,  exploring the idea of aesthetics and almost-built homes that will never see completion.

In addition to teaching and creating her fine art projects, Amanda consults for the VASA Project, an online media center focused on photography, digital video, criticism, visual studies, and new media.  She received an MFA in fine art photography from the Academy of Art University in 2011.


Pre-Abandoned:
Photography has a rich tradition of capturing the abandoned home, often showing the physical marks of the deterioration of the inhabitants’ lives. In this series I am exploring the beginning of this lifecycle by capturing new residential construction in master-planned communities. Where others see the hope and possibilities of a new home, I see “pre-abandoned spaces:” the American dream promised by the model homes unfulfilled by financial missteps, broken relationships, or simply the realities of the hardships of life. 

Medium Festival: Kurt Simonson

Featuring photographers seen at the Medium Festival in San Diego….


Sometimes the best part of attending a Photography Festival is not just the lectures, workshops, exhibits, and reviews, it’s simply sitting next to someone you don’t know while enjoying a beer. You learn about their life and interests, and discover over the course of the festival, what a great person you’ve met and realize you’ve begun a friendship.  This was the case with Kurt Simonson.

Originally from St Paul, Minnesota, Kurt is an artist/educator based in Long Beach, CA. Kurt’s work is regularly exhibited throughout the country and internationally, including recent exhibits at the Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado, and the Foto8 Gallery in London. His work has been featured in Fraction Magazine, he received a Curator’s Choice award from CENTER Santa Fe, and he was chosen as a finalist in Photolucida’s Critical Mass 2012.

Kurt teaches at Biola University in La Mirada, CA, where he is the Associate Professor of Photography in the Art Department. He received a B.S. in Studio Art from Biola University, a Secondary Education Credential from Whittier College, and an M.F.A. in Photography from California State University, Long Beach.

One of the projects that he brought to the Medium festival was Northwoods Journals, work that explores “the tensions surrounding our ideas of home and community, pilgrimage and displacement, belonging and connecting.”

 

Northwoods Journals

I must have been ten or eleven years old when I first ran across the peculiar envelope that bore my grandmother’s shaky handwriting: “not to be opened until my death.” Tucked in her top dresser drawer amidst other valuables, its striking phrase burned into my memory at a young age. I don’t know exactly when, and I don’t know how often, but I know I visited the envelope numerous times, pondering what could be inside. What could be so important (or tragic) that it must be kept secret in this way?

 I have never been able to shake the hold that piece of paper had over me.  More than just a letter—I was haunted by what it represented. Loaded with latent meaning, yet withholding its story, the letter is my experience of growing up in Minnesota. My family roots go deep into the folklore of the rural Northwoods and retain their hold, despite time and distance. It’s a place where my grandfather was a lumberjack, and a place where cars go to die; it’s where kids have playtime adventures, and where secrets go to be buried. It is a merger of myth and memory that grows more complex as time passes.

Brandon Juhasz

Ohio photographer, Brandon Juhasz, is a combination of Dr. Frankenstein, Picasso in his cubist period, and photographic outlier. He received his BFA from Bowling
Green State University where he was trained in photography and painting and his work seeks to “dissect and understand the entrenched power of images and photography in our
culture and the changing nature of the photographic image”. I’m showing some selections from his project, American Bigfoot is Monkey Suit.

Brandon’s work has been
included in many juried and curated exhibitions both locally and nationally
including the Hagedorn Gallery in Atlanta for the Atlanta Celebrates Photography
festival and MOCA Cleveland.
My work is an exploration of the power and saturation of our image based culture. I explore the concept of photography in contemporary society and its fluid and ubiquitous nature.  Photography is now an integral part of living. No longer a curiosity or hobby, photography is as common as driving a car. How does this affect us? How does it affect our ideals and worldview, our self-awareness or our memory? By using images found on the Internet to make new worlds I employ narrative image making to explore failure, desire and life in a post memory, post private hyper documented world.