Tag Archives: Photography Exhibition

Light from the Middle East

The Middle East, a sprawling and nuanced geographic mass that is home to many cultures and traditions, is often seen through the lens of politics. The Victoria & Albert Museums latest photography exhibition, however, manages to transcend this overarching narrative, producing a show that focuses on the subject of contemporary photographic practice.

As the exhibition’s curator Marta Weiss acknowledges, until now, the V & A Museums collection of photographs from the region reflected the Eurocentric term itself: Most of the photographs that we have that relate to the region were made by westerners, she says. This exhibition marks a departure from that, recognizing instead the wealth and variety of photo-making from this diverse region. This is very much an exhibition that is not about outsiders, but rather a view of the Middle East from the Middle East.”

Spanning over three decades and encompassing the work of some 30 artists and photographers, the show is divided into three parts: recording, re-framing and resisting. The categories, explains Weiss, show how photography is being employed by photographers.

The ambitiousness of the show lies not in its geographic scope, but rather in the drawing together of a diverse group of practitioners who have engaged with the medium in multiple ways.At one end of the spectrum, there is the iconic work of Magnum-photographer Abbas, documenting the unfolding revolution in Iran from 1978-1979 in his series Iran Diary, a precursor to the events attested to recently in the Arab spring. Nermine Hamman focuses on this very subject, photographing young Egyptian soldiers in Tahrir Square. Displayed in the “resistance” section of the exhibition, Hammans digitally altered images remove the soldiers from their immediate surroundings and place them instead among candy-colored mountain scapes and cherry blossoms. Entitled Upekkha (2011), the images have a postcard-like quality, drawing a parallel between the spectacle of Tahrir Square to that of a tourist attraction.

Despite the intention of the curators to shift the emphasis away from the political, Weiss acknowledges there is a lot of politics in the works. Though some of the photographers openly challenge this. Shadi Ghadirians re-staged portraits of Iranian women in the Qajar period (1786-1925) play on the tensions between tradition, modernity and gender. linkwheel . The warm grey theatrical studio photographs feature playful reminders of modernity, including an explorer bicycle and Pepsi can.

The artists on show do not limit themselves to just the Middle East however. Taysir Batnijis series documenting Israeli watchtowers in occupied Palestinian is a clear homage to German artists Bernd and Hillary Bechers iconic typologies of industrial structures in Europe. Yousef Nabil, who once worked with David LaChapelle, also looks to Europe for inspiration, photographing elderly Yemeni men in England. By hand-coloring the portraits in the style of old Egyptian film stills however, Nabil celebrates the rich tradition of Middle Eastern image-making, which, as the exhibition is testament to, is as strong and vibrant as ever.


Light from the Middle East: New Photography is on show at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London from Nov. 13 through April 7, 2013.

Kharunya Paramaguru is based in TIME’s London office.


FOTOWEEK DC

So much happening in Washington DC starting Saturday and it’s not all political.  Fotoweek DC is an incredible celebration of all things photography, with a heaping feast of exhibitions, education, lectures, portfolio reviews, and a city that is joining in the experience.

Among a large selection of exhibitions, Feature Shoot editor Alison Zavos and Amanda Gorence are presenting Come Together, a group photography exhibition featuring 18 photographers that is a mash-up of contemporary imagery that visually alludes to song titles by the Beatles. The experience of viewing the show can be likened to a Beatles-themed
game of charades, but using photos to invoke an interactive element,
even if the challenge is only going on inside the mind. Accessible and
lighthearted, the exhibition offers a unique perspective on one of the
most popular bands of all time. While some connections will be easier to
make than others, the images will cross all genres, allowing viewers of
different generations to find a meaningful relationship between the
photos.

I’m thrilled to be teaching the seminar:

STRATEGY & CREATION – SUNDAY, Nov. 11th
Industry
Knowledge For Beginning and Emerging Photographers – Aline Smithson
& PDN’s 30 Strategies for Young Working Photographers  REGISTER NOW

10am – 2pm, Goethe Institut*
Aline Smithson – The Broad View: Fine Art Portfolios from Context, to Creation, to Completion

The most important tool that a
photographer can bring to their work is knowledge and insight.  Many
photographers spend much of their education on learning the bells and
whistles of cameras and changing technology, and don’t consider what is
equally as important: Creating a voice, having ideas, producing stellar
prints, and knowing where the work they create fits into the
contemporary art market.  Ultimately, what is most rewarding and most
important is The Work.

This three-hour workshop is geared to
beginning and emerging photographers.  During the session, we will
explore how to develop ideas for projects by examining the fine art
market and by exploring the context of award winning or meaningful
portfolios.  Portfolios will be presented to also help explain
contemporary genres of photography, touching on categories that are
often offered in competitions or magazines, and we will look at what
kinds of work fits into what kind of market.

In the
workshop, we will also not only discuss how to create a portfolio but in
addition, how to present a body of work to the fine art market,
focusing on your ability to articulate your work and produce quality
photographs.  The details that surround the work you make are important
to establishing yourself as a professional.

There are lots of terrific seminars to attend:

MoMA’s New Photography 2012

Since it was established in 1985, the annual New Photography exhibition at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art has sought to showcase emerging photographers who are experimenting with techniques, subject matter and presentation that challenge the very definition of the medium itself. That goal has only gotten more difficult each year, as advances in technology and social media sites such as Facebook and Instagram have bombarded viewers with a proliferation of images; the New York Times predicts that more than 380 billion photographs were taken in 2011 alone. That saturated environment serves as the backdrop of this year’s show, which opens Oct. 3 and runs through Feb. 4. And while it’s a reoccurring theme among this year’s five featured photographers (Michele Abeles, Shirana Shahbazi, Zoe Crosher, Anne Collier and the collective Birdhead, composed of Shanghai natives Ji Weiyu and Song Tao), the artists’ different approach to image saturation nods to the wide breath of work that New Photography hopes to survey each year.

“We often think about variety and diversity, so that each artistwhatever ideas they’re exploringwill stand apart from one another,” says associate curator Eva Respini. “It’s in the mix of the artists that you can get a sense of the diversity of what’s happening in contemporary photography today.” Among this year’s mix: Abeles (American, b. 1977), whose collage-like work juxtaposes male nudes against common objects like wine bottles; Shahbazi (German, b. Iran 1974), who disseminates her images in various creative ways, such as a photo rug with help from weavers in her native Tehran; Crosher (American, b. 1975), who re-purposes and re-photographs Michelle Dubois’s existing archive of self portraits; Collier (American, b. 1970), who combines found objects in her reflection of mass media and pop culture; and Birdhead, (Ji Weiyu, Chinese, b. 1980, and Song Tao, Chinese, b. directory submission . 1979), whose black-and-white snapshots of daily Shanghai life are installed in grid format, without ever identifying the author of an individual image. “The fact that they don’t really distinguish who takes what pictures speaks to what their work is about,” says Respini. “It’s a reflection of a Facebook generationa generation that’s used to thinking about multiple images and an accumulation of images instead of discrete images that are elevated to a fine art status.” Four of the five artists are women, a trend Respini says would be “great to continue.”

Even the installation of the show itself reflects photography’s changing nature. Visitors will see traditional modes of presentationsuch as framed photographs on a wallbut also more sculptural elements, such as lithographic wallpaper fromShahbazi and a site-specific configuration from Birdhead. This, combined with the diverse output from the photographers themselves, willas MoMa surely hopes, anywayelevate New Photography 2012 from the mass of photography exhibitions.

New Photography opens October 3, and runs through February 4, 2013. Learn more about the show here.

The London Photographers’ Gallery Reopens with Edward Burtynsky and Animated GIFs

© Kate Elliott, Courtesy The Photographers’ Gallery

Likely few would consider animated GIF images–those primitive computer animations often just a few pixels wide–fit enough for a photography exhibition. Perhaps that’s because there has yet to be a space fit enough to exhibit them. Now, London’s Photographers’ Gallery, which finally reopened this May with double the exhibition space after an 18-month, £9.2m renovation, offers digital facilities to support a rapidly evolving medium.

One of the main reasons behind the renovation which began in 2010, Gallery Director Brett Rogers says in a video interview with the Guardian, was to develop ”facilities that are fit for purpose in the 21st century, to show works of a larger scale, but also to reflect the conditions in which most people experience photography.”

The Soho gallery was the first independent public space in Britain devoted to photography when it was founded in the 1970s. Today, in addition to three floors of gallery space, room enough for the commanding, large-scale prints in their inaugural exhibition of Edward Burtynsky’s oil photographs (on view through July 1, 2012), they’ve also built what they call a “digital wall.”

This display, located near the gallery entrance, is made up of eight large screens presenting a running program of digital images visible from the outside street. Wendy McMurdo, one of 40 artists that includes Penelope Umbrico, was asked to produce a moving image GIF for the wall by Katrina Sluis, the galley’s new curator of digital programing. McMurdo writes on the FOAM blog on the “joy” of contributing to their inaugural digital exhibition Born in 1987: the animated GIF (on view through July 1, 2012). This initiative, McMurdo says, demonstrates the gallery’s “recognition that it is in the digital and social domain that photography must, ultimately, discover its new purposes and new meaning.”

On the other hand, the Photographers’ Gallery is also offering opportunity to counterbalance what Edwin Heathcote for the Financial Times calls the “culture of browsing and glancing”–when people end up scanning thousands of images a day–that has come to prominence with such development. One room in the space is dedicated to exhibiting a single image that will change four times a year.

Moreover, their new education center doubles as a camera obscura, which in conjunction with the digital wall, Rogers says, should “enable people to reflect on the history of optics,” in its entirety.

Burtynsky: Oil
Exhibition on view:
May 19 – July 1, 2012

Born in 1987: the animated GIF
Exhibition on view:
May 19 – July 1, 2012

This Sunday, June 3, 2012 at 3:00 pm, join Katrina Sluis for a FREE discussion on “Curating the Digital Image.”

The Photographers’ Gallery
16 – 18 Ramillies Street
London, UK W1F 7LW
+44(0)20 7087 9300

Photo Prize Round-Up — 04.26.12


Aperture offers a round-up of the latest, greatest, and most rapidly-approaching deadlines in the ever-expanding world of photo prizes.


Moving Walls Exhibition (deadline: April 30, 2012, 5PM EST)

History When the New York headquarters of the Open Society Foundations moved to their 400 West 59th Street location in 1997, a photography exhibition was not part of the plan, but the many large, empty walls of the space presented an opportunity to feature imagery that would amplify the foundation’s missions.

Concept Supporting documentary photographers whose work addresses social justice and human rights issues that coincide with the OSF‘s mission of promoting and expanding open society. Priority is given to work whose subject has not been recently addressed in Moving Walls, and special consideration is given to long-term work produced over years of commitment to an issue or community.

This Year Celebrating its 20th exhibition cycle, Moving Walls 20 will be the inaugural exhibition in the Open Society Foundations’ new headquarters on West 57th Street in New York.

How To ApplyAll entries must be submitted online by 5PM EST on Monday, April 30, 2012


Santa Fe Photographic Workshops (deadline: April 30, 2012, 11:59pm MST)

HistoryAfter many, many requests from Santa Fe Photographic Workshop participants and students, the organization offered its first-ever photography competition during the summer of 2010.

Concept Since conception, the Santa Fe Photographic Workshop‘s semi-annual competitions have focused on broad conceptual themes (Family, Light, Summer). The current cycle is a call for participants’ best examples of The Portrait: “Environmental, studio, candid, or posed. Self or pet, color, black-and-white, alternative process or iPhone.”

This YearSpring 2012′s esteemed panel of judges includes: Kathy Ryan, Director of Photography, The New York Times Magazine; Scott Thode, Editor-in-Chief, VII magazine; Katherine Ware, Curator of Photography, New Mexico Museum of Art; Sean Kernan, Photographer; and Reid Callanan, Director, Santa Fe Photographic Workshops

The winning images will be featured on Aline Smithson’s Lenscratch blogzine, and Grand Prize alone is worth over $5,000.

How To Apply Submit electronically through the competition website by 11:59PM MST on April 30, 2012


Image12 – ASMP New York (deadline: May 1, 2012)

History› Now in its twelfth iteration, Image is a nationwide photo contest run by the New York chapter of the American Society of Media Photographers, the leading trade association for professional photographers, promoting rights, education, better business practices and ethics.

Concept› Without thematic constraints, all of the eligible ASMP Image entries will be judged on the concept, creativity and technical execution of individual submissions. Entries are channeled into Student and Professional judging pools, each with their own respective first, second and third place winners. All images submitted to Image12 must have been created on or before January 1, 2011.

This Year› Image12’s judging panel includes: Elizabeth Avedon, Independent Curator and Writer, La Lettre; Holly Stuart Hughes, Editor, PDN; Jody Quon, Photography Director, New York Magazine; Marc Sobier, Global Director, Y&R NY; Hosanna Marshall, Art Buyer/Creative Producer, Saatchi & Saatchi NY

First Place prizes include publication of the winning Image in a full-page ad in Photo District News, and an exhibition of the winning Image in a New York gallery.

How To Apply› All entries must be received via web by May 1, 2012


Japan’s Young Portfolio (deadline: May 15, 2012): View further details here.

AI-PA Latin American Fotografia (deadline: June 30, 2012): View further details here.

Missing something? Send us links and recommendations via direct message on twitter, @aperturefnd

 

Out of Focus: Photography @ Saatchi Gallery, London


Just opened to the public at Saatchi Gallery is the eagerly anticipated Out of Focus, an exciting survey of contempoaray photography featuring a kaleidoscopic range of work with artists using photography in diverse and innovative ways. squido lense . Artists featured include Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, John Stezaker, Mitch Epstein and may others in what should be a fascinating and diverse look at the state of the medium.  

Out of Focus, the first major photography exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery since the highly acclaimed and controversial 2001 show I Am a Camera, presents 38 artists who offer an international perspective on current trends in photography, working with the medium in diverse, innovative and arresting ways. 
This exhibition comes at a time when the world of photography is going through one of its richest and also most complicated moments. Millions of images are being uploaded onto the internet every day making available more visual stimuli than ever before; old ideas about professional and amateur photographers are being upturned; the traditional boundaries between various territories within the world of photography – fashion, documentary, advertising and art – are blurring into one another in unexpected, exciting and not always tension-free ways; and even the labels artist and photographer are the subject of debate (Olaf Breuning responds to this thorny topic by describing himself as a four-wheel drive, all-purpose terrain vehicle).  
The work included in the show has been brought together to “challenge the received rules and regulations of the medium” while the artists featured within flag up shared concerns of the body and gender tensions, mind and memory, a sense of place and home, the face, bonds of family, friends, tribes and other subcultures, but display a huge range of approaches from classic documentary photography to the reworking of found images, from capturing collaborative performances to photographs of three-dimensional assemblages themselves made out of photographs. 
Out of Focus features works by Michele Abeles, Leonce Raphael Agbodjlou, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Olaf Breuning, Jonny Briggs, Elina Brotherus, Anders Clausen, Mat Collishaw, JH Engstrm, Mitch Epstein, Andreas Gefeller, Daniel Gordon, Noemie Goudal, Katy Grannan, Luis Guispert, Matthew Day Jackson, Chris Levine, Matt Lipps, Ryan McGinley, Mohau Modisakeng, Laurel Nakadate, Sohei Nishino, David Noonan, Marlo Pascual, Mariah Robertson, Hannah Sawtell, David Benjamin Sherry, Meredyth Sparks, Hannah Starkey, John Stezaker, A L Steiner, Mikhael Subotzky, Yumiko Utsu, Sara VanDerBeek, Nicole Wermers, Jennifer West and Pinar Yolaan. 
A catalogue to accompany the exhibition is published by Booth-Clibborn Editions with an essay by William E Ewing, former director of the Muse de l’Elyse in Lausanne. The exhibition runs until 22 July 2012.

Out of Focus: Photography @ Saatchi Gallery, London


Just opened to the public at Saatchi Gallery is the eagerly anticipated Out of Focus, an exciting survey of contempoaray photography featuring a kaleidoscopic range of work with artists using photography in diverse and innovative ways. Artists featured include Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, John Stezaker, Mitch Epstein and may others in what should be a fascinating and diverse look at the state of the medium.  

Out of Focus, the first major photography exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery since the highly acclaimed and controversial 2001 show I Am a Camera, presents 38 artists who offer an international perspective on current trends in photography, working with the medium in diverse, innovative and arresting ways. 
This exhibition comes at a time when the world of photography is going through one of its richest and also most complicated moments. Millions of images are being uploaded onto the internet every day making available more visual stimuli than ever before; old ideas about professional and amateur photographers are being upturned; the traditional boundaries between various territories within the world of photography – fashion, documentary, advertising and art – are blurring into one another in unexpected, exciting and not always tension-free ways; and even the labels artist and photographer are the subject of debate (Olaf Breuning responds to this thorny topic by describing himself as a four-wheel drive, all-purpose terrain vehicle).  
The work included in the show has been brought together to “challenge the received rules and regulations of the medium” while the artists featured within flag up shared concerns of the body and gender tensions, mind and memory, a sense of place and home, the face, bonds of family, friends, tribes and other subcultures, but display a huge range of approaches from classic documentary photography to the reworking of found images, from capturing collaborative performances to photographs of three-dimensional assemblages themselves made out of photographs. 
Out of Focus features works by Michele Abeles, Leonce Raphael Agbodjlou, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Olaf Breuning, Jonny Briggs, Elina Brotherus, Anders Clausen, Mat Collishaw, JH Engstrm, Mitch Epstein, Andreas Gefeller, Daniel Gordon, Noemie Goudal, Katy Grannan, Luis Guispert, Matthew Day Jackson, Chris Levine, Matt Lipps, Ryan McGinley, Mohau Modisakeng, Laurel Nakadate, Sohei Nishino, David Noonan, Marlo Pascual, Mariah Robertson, Hannah Sawtell, David Benjamin Sherry, Meredyth Sparks, Hannah Starkey, John Stezaker, A L Steiner, Mikhael Subotzky, Yumiko Utsu, Sara VanDerBeek, Nicole Wermers, Jennifer West and Pinar Yolaan. 
A catalogue to accompany the exhibition is published by Booth-Clibborn Editions with an essay by William E Ewing, former director of the Muse de l’Elyse in Lausanne. SEO Experts search engine marketing . The exhibition runs until 22 July 2012.

Emily Shur, Untitled #19

Emily Shur, Untitled #19

Emily Shur

Untitled #19,
, 2012
From the Nature Calls series
Website – EmilyShur.com

Emily Shur was born in New York City, at New York Hospital, to an auditorium full of nursing students. She attended the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University with a major in Photography and graduated in 1998 with academic honors along with the Artist Award for Creative Excellence. Emily’s work has been featured on numerous websites including Tiny Vices and 20×200 and has been exhibited in New York, Los Angeles, and San Francisco. In 2008, she was honored to have an image in the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London. In 2009 and 2010, Emily was one of 100 photographers invited to participate in Review Santa Fe, and in 2010 her work was also included in Humble Art’s 31 Women in Art Photography exhibition. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and their dog, The Baroness, in a 106 year-old house in Echo Park.