Tag Archives: Photography Contests

NAKED JUDGING: The 2012 Canteen Awards in Photography

Due date for this contest is December 30th!!

Canteen Magazine publisher, Stephen Pierson, contacted me recently about a ground breaking idea for a photography contest, NAKED JUDGING: The 2012 Canteen Awards in Photography.  Canteen is a highly respected magazine and Stephen has given this idea a lot of thought–the idea is to have a completely transparent contest, where judging is live, so that participants can experience the behind the scenes drama of how things are selected. All submissions will have some kinds of critique, and there will be a clear presentation of how all submission monies are spent.  I will be partnering with Canteen to provide the on-line exposure for the winners. This indeed, is a contest unlike any other…

Naked Judging: The 2012
Canteen Awards in Photography
Canteen magazine is holding our second photography contest
because of our general disdain for photography contests. They tend to be opaque
affairs that stifle dialogue—the winners are chosen, no one quite knows why,
and 99% of the participants are left without their entrance fee or an
explanation. The real winners are the organizations1 
that run and profit exorbitantly from them.

We are trying to do
something different. Namely, treat our participants as partners. We aim to be
fully transparent about the entire selection process, placing the judges’
criteria, biases, and disagreements on full, naked display. The result, we
hope, will be an honest and provocative conversation about photography.

To these ends, Naked
Judging: The 2012 Canteen Awards in Photography offers several novel features:
      
A live finale: The final
round of judging, featuring the top 25 submissions, will occur in front of a
live audience, and will be simultaneously streamed online. Prior to the winners
being selected, audience members (both in-person and online) can probe the
judges with questions.

      Every submission openly
critiqued:
Similar to our first photo contest, brief notes/critiques
from all judging rounds will be available on our website for every submission.
      
Longer-form critiques:
The winning submission and other select submissions will be the subject of
longer-form discussions and essays in the next print issue of Canteen magazine,
and through this contest’s official partner, Lenscratch.
In addition, select participants will be given the opportunity to publicly
respond to the judges’ comments.

     
Nonprofit model: We are
not only providing a low entry fee ($20 for 5 to 8 images, and $15 for
students), but we will document on our website how every dollar is spent. At
the contest’s conclusion, any profits will be refunded back to the entrants.

We hope not only that our
contest will produce a provocative dialogue about photography, but also that it
will nudge other organizations into adopting practices that are friendlier to
the community of photographers that they purport to represent.

For
questions and feedback email Stephen Pierson, Canteen’s Director.



Bojune Kwon

I’m heading to China next month and when I came across the work of Bojune Kwon, I wondered if this is what I should expect. The irony of this thinking is that these images were all taken in New York City. Because Bojune is a foreigner living in America, his perspective allows him to share the sense of unfamiliarity he experiences, and allows us to see our country in new ways.

Bojune was born and grew up in South Korea, majoring in photography at Kyung-Il University, and recently graduated from New York City’s School of Visual Arts with a Masters degree in digital photography. Bojune’s photographs have received awards in several international photography contests, including the Sappi/Magno Intensity Photographic Competition, Epson International Photographic Pano Awards and Photographer’s Forum Contest. He now works as a freelance commercial and fine-art photographer.

Nurosis: In Spite of the flood of people that inhabit the city, I am often struck by the difficulty of finding happiness and making real connections with others. However, I find myself getting used to a feeling of indifference to others, and think that it might be natural that people do not make every effort to know each other in this environment.

My blurry images of people, without clearly visible facial expressions, explore what I see as the nature of a city and our existence within it. I am interested in the neurosis that the modern city has generated.