Tag Archives: Photography Collection

Kristoffer Axén at ICP, Photoville

The Rabbit Hole, At Sea At Night by Kristoffer Axén

Congratulations to Kristoffer Axén, whose images Day Three and The Conversation will join the Photography Collection at the ICP next month. The photographs are part of a new, on-going, series called ‘Events in Nature’ (from which a selection can be viewed at this year’s Tierney Fellowship Exhibition at Photoville, the new Brooklyn-based photo destination).

The Tierney Fellowship was created in 2003 by The Tierney Family Foundation to support emerging artists in the field of photography. Axén will be exhibited among a promising roster of artist, which includes Nicholas Calcott, Luo Dan, Ishaan Dixit, Gabrielle Goliath, Emily Kinni, Bryan Krueger, Carlos Licon, Mack Michael Magagane, Bruno Ruiz, Rubi Rose Siblo-Landsman, Roberto Tondopó, Aubrey Tseleng, and Terttu Uibopuu.

The Tierney Fellowship Exhibition
Opening | Friday June 22, 7 to 10PM, on view through July 1
Brooklyn Bridge Park, New York City

 


›› The successful Fotojatka festival that traveled to cinemas around the Czech Republic – screening specially produced photographic slideshow – is now over. But, you can still view Kristoffer Axén’s contribution online, featured alongside slideshows by more than a dozen contemporary photographers, amongst them Erwin Olaf, Nikos Economopoulos and Reiner Riedler.
›› For those interested in introducing prints from Kristoffer Axén into their personal collection of photography, we recommend The Rabbit Hole from the series At Sea At Night, available via Aperture

In the Factory of Dreams: Behind the Scenes on Telenovelas

A woman in a white shirt poses seductively on a plush bed. Across the hall, a handsome doctor stands tall, stethoscope hung loosely around his neck. No, this isn’t a scene from Fifty Shades of Gray. It’s the stage set of the hotbed of telenovela production at the Televisa Studios in Mexico City—and the subject of a new photography collection named after it: The Factory of Dreams by San Francisco native artist Stefan Ruiz.

Televisa, the largest Spanish-language broadcaster in the world, produces nearly 50,000 hours-worth of telenovelas each year and exports them to about 50 countries. These soap operas hold a central place in Latin culture, arguably far more than their mainstream American counterparts. Ruiz had rare access to photograph the stars and sets of Televisa’s telenovelas for the past eight years.

Ruiz says he saw actors, sets and lighting as a fresh lens to examine issues of race, class and beauty that he’d previously examined with traditional documentary portraiture. “I was interested in the various types [of actors], and in how the definitions of beauty and class are often defined by race,” he explained in the book. “Generally, the stars look European. The maids do not. And the villains vary.”

The sets also provided Ruiz an ideal space to explore the concept of fame. “It was interesting that many of the telenovela actors were huge stars in much of the world, but virtually unknown in the U.S. and northern Europe,” he said.

Ruiz’s collection captures the stars in the moments between their public and personal lives. He exposes the “seams between fiction and reality” as an essayist in his book put it. Yes, his audience may enjoy the brief telenovela vignettes that accompany the photos. But fans will almost certainly love Ruiz’s subtle glimpse into the private lives of their stars.

So what did Ruiz find most fascinating about his close proximity to these stars? For one, the Televisa system resembled old-time Hollywood. The soaps were filmed quickly and big-name actors were on set much of the time. “Once I had access from Televisa, the stars were generally pretty accessible and were almost always up to being photographed as long as time permitted,” he says. “There were no agents or publicists on set.” The actors themselves were actually fairly down-to-Earth. “For years the film industry in Mexico was almost dead, and this was the only steady acting work around,” Ruiz notes. “I got the feeling that they were appreciative of their jobs.”

Stefan Ruiz is a photographer and San Francisco native. More of his work can be seen here. The book Factory of Dreams will be published June, 2012, by Aperture.

Altered Landscapes at the Nevada Museum of Art


from Site Specific_New York City O7. © Olivo Barbieri

The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment

Exhibition on view:
September 24, 2011-January 15, 2012

Nevada Museum of Art:
160 West Liberty Street
Reno, NV
(775) 329-3333

The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment is the current photography exhibition at the Nevada Museum of Art. The exhibit features the museum’s signature photography collection which examines human interaction with the environment. The exhibit, and its accompanying deluxe volume book, showcase the museum’s immense and diverse collection of landscape photography. Altered Landscape features the work of many Aperture-published photographers including founding member Ansel Adams, Robert Adams, featured in Aperture issues 197, 180 and the books Summer Nights and The New West; Olivo Barbieri, featured in Photo Art: Photography in the 21st Century; Marilyn Bridges, whose print Journey, Monument Valley, Arizona/Utah is available from Aperture; William Christenberry, featured in issue 183 and whose Aperture books includes Kodachromes; William Eggleston, featured in issue 196; Lee Friedlander, featured in The New York Times Magazine Photographs and issue 188; Richard Misrach, featured in issues 193 and 174 and whose Aperture titles includes Destroy This Memory; Edward Weston, whose books include Nudes and The Flame of Recognition; and many more.

SNAPSHOT: Alex Webb

Interview by Anna Carnick

Alex Webb, self portrait in Hong Kong while on press for The Suffering of Light.

Picture 1 of 12


Aperture is pleased to introduce “SNAPSHOT,” a new series of interviews with photography’s luminaries, inspired by the Proust Questionnaire. For our series debut, we spoke with the always thoughtful, ever-surprising Alex Webb.

Webb’s latest photography collection, The Suffering of Light: Thirty Years of Photographs by Alex Webb, is available now through Aperture.

AC: How do you describe your personality?
AW:
Obsessive, persistent––maybe even Sisyphean––but with a sense of humor.

What is your idea of happiness?
I suspect pure happiness is only attainable for brief periods.  Creative fulfillment, however, seems like a more sustainable goal––taking the work one believes in to its ultimate end.

What do you believe is your greatest achievement as an artist so far?
If I’ve made some sort of contribution to photography––and that’s not for me to say––I think it’s about having discovered a way of working in intense color in the tropics with an eye towards the enigmatic, the unexpected, and the sometimes paradoxical.

I also think that Rebecca Norris Webb and I have made a small but unique contribution to the history of photographic collaborations with the Violet Isle project, a project which created a more complicated portrait of the island––and its people and animals––than either of our individual visions could have done alone.

If you weren’t a photographer, what would you be?
Perhaps a novelist, though I am quite sure that I would have failed miserably at it.  I think I need the immediacy of the experience of the world for inspiration.  I think I do much better walking the streets and responding with a camera than staring at a blank sheet of paper in a room.

Who is your favorite artist, of any genre?
Blues is my favorite kind of music, and I love Buddy Guy’s music––though I think Stevie Ray Vaughn’s version of Little Wing is pretty special . . .

What is your favorite photograph?
I have a lot of favorite photographs, but I’ll mention one that has lingered in my mind for many years: Robert Frank’s picture of the back of a hearse-like vehicle in London.  I love the open-ended questions that Frank’s photograph poses:  Is that a hearse? Where exactly is that child in the fog running––and why?

The last book you really enjoyed?
I recently read Vargas Llosa’s The Way to Paradise, a novel that interweaves the lives of Flora Tristan, a nineteenth century social activist, and her grandson, the painter Paul Gauguin.  The depiction of the latter is particularly compelling.

Name a person—living or dead—you’d really like to meet.
I wouldn’t even know where to begin. . . . I suppose, if I spoke Russian, I would have liked to have met Tolstoy–especially on his estate.

What qualities do you appreciate most in friends?
I think probably a good-natured sense of humor, especially the ability to laugh at yourself.

Your favorite motto?
I love the following from the sculptor Henry Moore, from late in his life:

The secret of life is to have a task, something you devote your entire life to, something you bring everything to, every minute of the day for the rest of your life. And the most important thing is, it must be something you cannot possibly do.

 

Anna Carnick is a Brooklyn-based writer and editor. Previously the editor of both Graphis Inc. and Clear Magazine, she has been an Aperture editor since 2010. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times Style Magazine (The Moment), Photo District News (PDN), PopPhoto.com, Dazed & Confused, Casa Vogue, Dwell.com, Coolhunting.com, and others.

 

 

 

Last day of Exposure 2011 at Hyman Photography on view in London

regine_petersen

North West Africa 5389, by Regine Petersen

Today is the last day of an exhibition presented by James Hyman Photography of recent works by the six successful applicants for the 2010 National Media Museum Photography Awards. Selected from more than 200 applicants, these six artists were judged to reflect the significant range and diversity of photographic practice visible in the UK today.

The 2010 awardees whose work will be exhibited at James Hyman Photography are:

Jim Cooke, who will receive funding to complete his series showing marginal plants that line the river Thames. marietta appliance repair . Anna Fox, whose award will go towards a book and exhibition of her latest project documenting the contemporary state of a long-standing British tradition of holiday camps at Butlins.
Stuart Griffiths, whose projectThe Northern Ireland Archive documents an autobiographical response to the landscape of Northern Ireland and its post-conflict condition. Clarita Lulic, awarded to produce her autobiographical series documenting a seven-month tour as a cruise ship photographer.
Regine Petersen, whose seriesFind a Falling Star is an ongoing historical and topographical view of meteorites. Vanessa Winship, whose work has received international recognition for its sensitive and resonating portraits exploring Georgian identities.

The award is sponsored by Michael G Wilson (Chairman of the Trustees of the National Media Museum), Zelda Cheatle (Curator and Director of the Tosca Fund Photography Collection), Simon Crocker (Chairman of The John Kobal Foundation), Pierre Brahm (Chairman of the BRAHM and Henry & James Property Group), and James Hyman (James Hyman Photography, London), all of whom also sit on the award judging panel.

James Hyman Photography
5 Savile RowLondon W1S 3PD

Click here to purchase a limited edition photograph byRegine Petersen