Tag Archives: Photography Books

Photo News – Mute: The Silence of Dogs by Martin Usborne book signing

How could I resist posting more photos from Martin Usborne’s marvellous book of doggie portraits, Mute: The Silence of Dogs? Especially as the book signing took place this afternoon at at the Kerher Verlag Publishing stand at Paris Photo. Book price: Euros 39.90

All photos © Martin Usborne, The Silence of Dogs

And for four more, read more…


All photos © Martin Usborne, The Silence of Dogs

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Books Tagged: Kerher Verlag Publishing, Martin Usborne, Mute: The Silence of Dogs, Paris Photo, photobook

Open Vote – The European Bank of Reconstruction and Development puts staff photo competition images to online vote

JUDGE FOR YOURSELF
If you fancy yourself as a judge and want to make a vote, follow the link to 50 photographs submitted to an annual competition arranged for staff working for the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development.

This is the fourth year of the internal competition and I had the pleasure to help judge the winners with photographer, author and publisher Anthony Osmond-Evans who recently published Spirit of London a coffee-table book documenting “the changing seasons, personalities and cultures” making up today’s London. The standard of entries was high and both Anthony and I found it difficult at times to choose between images.

Over 800 single images were submitted in five categories to the competition. To cast your vote, follow the link to the Facebook EBRD Peoples’ Choice page. “Photos taken by our staff capture people, landscapes and events from our region and beyond. ‘Like’ the images that impress you the most and help us select the very best of 2012″ from 50 photos.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Awards & Competitions, Photography Books, Photography Shows Tagged: Anthony Osmond-Evans, European Bank of Reconstruction and Development, Miranda Gavin, photo competition, Spirit of London, staff photo competition

Photo Stroll – Press preview Tom Wood Men & Women and Shoot! Existential Photography open at The Photographers’ Gallery London

Today, a whirlwind Photo Stroll tour through the press preview today of two photo shows, Tom Wood’s photo show Men & Women, and the shoot-themed collection of photos Shoot! Existential Photography. Both exhibitions open tomorrow at The Photographers’ Gallery in London and run until 6 January. So there’s plenty of time to take a stroll.

These shows combine a diverse range of visual genres and the tenderness of Wood’s beautifully articulated moments offsets the drama of the shoot imagery, such as Christian Marclay’s Crossfire and the various images of gun-toting women, including Fire at Will documenting Niki de Saint Phalle’s ‘shooting paintings’ created in the early 1960s. For those who fancy themselves as the fastest draw in the West (End), there’s even a shooting alley where, if you hit the bulls eye or the surrounding ring (see my attempt, last photo), the camera is triggered and Bingo, you get a photo of you shooting. For more on Men & Women, see earlier post on Tom Wood.
All iPhone photos © Miranda Gavin, 2012.

Click to view slideshow.

Click link to view the gallery images from the slide show…

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Filed under: Photo Stroll, Photographers, Photography Books, Photography Shows Tagged: Christian Marclay, Crossfire, Erik Kessels, Fire at Will, london, Men & Women, Niki de Saint Phalle, Shoot! Existential Photography, The Photographers’ Gallery, Tom Wood

Thomas Jackson, Glow sticks #1

Thomas Jackson, Glow sticks #1

Thomas Jackson

Glow sticks #1,
67 Steps Beach, Greenport, New York, 2012
From the Emergent Behavior series
Website – ThomasJacksonPhotography.com

Thomas Jackson grew up in Providence, Rhode Island. After earning a B.A. in History at The College of Wooster, he spent much of his career in New York as an editor and book reviewer for magazines. It was his particular interest in photography books that led him to pick up a camera eight years ago, first shooting Garry Winogrand-style street scenes, then landscapes, and finally the staged work he does today. His work has been shown at Central Booking in DUMBO, Brooklyn, the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, Vamp and Tramp Booksellers, The Center for Books Arts and the Governors Island Art Fair. He lives in Brooklyn.

The Latin American Photobook, Jonathan Torgovnik’s Intended Consequences Win Les Rencontres d’Arles Awards

The Latin American Photobook, edited by Horacio Fernández and published by Aperture, has been awarded the historical book award at the Rencontres d’Arles photography festival. The volume, a blend of bibliography, facsimile, and encyclopedia, offers a critical study of the most important photography books to come out of Latin America, from the 1920s to today. Along with Aperture’s The Dutch Photobook: A Thematic Selection from 1945 Onwards and Japanese Photobooks of the 1960s and ’70s, The Latin American Photobook is part of a growing body of scholarship on the photobook and its place in photographic history.

Jonathan Torgovnik won the Rencontres d’Arles Discovery prize for Intended Consequences—his portraits of women and their children who were born of rape in the Rwandan genocide—which was published by Aperture in 2009. Watch an excerpt of a panel discussion with Torgovnik, and read an interview with the photographer on FLYP. Intended Consequences and limited-edition prints of Torgovnik’s work are available for up to 35% off as part of Aperture’s summer sale, until midnight EST, August 10, 2012.

Check out The Guardian for more coverage of the Rencontres d’Arles festival prizes.

Andrew Phelps, Untitled

Andrew Phelps, Untitled

Andrew Phelps

Untititled,
Higley, Arizona, 2011
From the Haboob series
Website – Andrew-Phelps.com

Andrew Phelps is an American photographer who has been living in Europe since 1990. His work is influenced by the cross-cultural lifestyle he now leads, dividing his time between the deserts of Arizona and the Alps of Austria. Alongside a constant pursuit of new work, Andrew keeps a blog about special edition photography books called BUFFET. Andrew is a member of the Piece of Cake project.

In the Factory of Dreams: Behind the Scenes on Telenovelas

A woman in a white shirt poses seductively on a plush bed. Across the hall, a handsome doctor stands tall, stethoscope hung loosely around his neck. No, this isn’t a scene from Fifty Shades of Gray. It’s the stage set of the hotbed of telenovela production at the Televisa Studios in Mexico City—and the subject of a new photography collection named after it: The Factory of Dreams by San Francisco native artist Stefan Ruiz.

Televisa, the largest Spanish-language broadcaster in the world, produces nearly 50,000 hours-worth of telenovelas each year and exports them to about 50 countries. These soap operas hold a central place in Latin culture, arguably far more than their mainstream American counterparts. Ruiz had rare access to photograph the stars and sets of Televisa’s telenovelas for the past eight years.

Ruiz says he saw actors, sets and lighting as a fresh lens to examine issues of race, class and beauty that he’d previously examined with traditional documentary portraiture. “I was interested in the various types [of actors], and in how the definitions of beauty and class are often defined by race,” he explained in the book. “Generally, the stars look European. The maids do not. And the villains vary.”

The sets also provided Ruiz an ideal space to explore the concept of fame. “It was interesting that many of the telenovela actors were huge stars in much of the world, but virtually unknown in the U.S. and northern Europe,” he said.

Ruiz’s collection captures the stars in the moments between their public and personal lives. He exposes the “seams between fiction and reality” as an essayist in his book put it. Yes, his audience may enjoy the brief telenovela vignettes that accompany the photos. But fans will almost certainly love Ruiz’s subtle glimpse into the private lives of their stars.

So what did Ruiz find most fascinating about his close proximity to these stars? For one, the Televisa system resembled old-time Hollywood. The soaps were filmed quickly and big-name actors were on set much of the time. “Once I had access from Televisa, the stars were generally pretty accessible and were almost always up to being photographed as long as time permitted,” he says. “There were no agents or publicists on set.” The actors themselves were actually fairly down-to-Earth. “For years the film industry in Mexico was almost dead, and this was the only steady acting work around,” Ruiz notes. “I got the feeling that they were appreciative of their jobs.”

Stefan Ruiz is a photographer and San Francisco native. More of his work can be seen here. The book Factory of Dreams will be published June, 2012, by Aperture.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • “MediaStorm broke new ground in digital publishing on Tuesday,” writes Jonathan D. Woods for Time‘s Lightbox, “with the launch of a pay-per-story video player, one of the industry’s most exciting attempts to capitalize on the strength of multimedia productions.” The company’s founder Brian Storm explains the decision to start charging viewers $1.99 for their latest premium multimedia content.  Maggie Steber, whose piece “Rite of Passage,” is one of the first offered under this arrangement, responds to early critics of the new publishing model.
  • Kathy Ryan, for The New York Times‘ 6th Floor blog, covers the Alex Webb interview with Geoff Dyer at last weekend’s Look3 Festival, offers some choice quotes and a selection of images that appeared in the photographer’s retrospective monograph The Suffering of Light (Aperture 2011). PhotoShelter Blog offers a more extensive “Look3 Festival Round-Up,” in journal format with images of some of the exhibition spaces.
  • Joerg Colberg publishes a piece on Conscientious called “Photography After Photography (A Provocation)” which addresses the question, “Now that we’ve done all that stuff that you can see in history-of-photography books, now that we’ve become obsessed with re-creating that past over and over again – how can we turn around, to look at and move into the future?” It garnered a bit of attention and a response from Fototazo titled “What Is Progress in Photography Today?
  • PetaPixel posts this video of a talk that Lytro founder Ren Ng gave at TEDxSanJoseCA last month on the future of photography, exploring how his company’s revolutionary camera which allows users to “shoot now, focus later,” will change the art form.  They also shared a nice info-graphic this week, “A Shapshot of the Photography Industry” which illustrates just how rapidly technology has revolutionized the field. In 2000, 99% of photography was analog. Today, that number is more like 1%.
  • LIFE publishes “Father’s Day Special: Life with Famous Dads,” featuring a slideshow of images from their archive, NYTimes’ LENS Blog takes a look at work by Zun Lee, “Exploring African American Fatherhood,” and NPR’s The Picture Show profiles the highly compelling photographs by Timothy Archibald–”Frustrated By Autism, A Father Turns To Photos“–which explore not his son’s diagnosis, but their ensuing relationship.