Tag Archives: Photographic Projects

It’s Personal: 13 Photographic Visions

For the last twelve years, it have had the pleasure to teach at the Julia Dean Photo Workshops in Los Angeles, under the leadership of the amazing Julia Dean. Starting in January at JDPW, I began working with a group of thirteen talented Los Angeles photographers–all established image makers with solo shows, books, and numerous awards under their belts.  For nine months,  we came together for critique, feedback, and mentor ship as the photographers created or continued significant photographic projects.  The result is that each has developed a new portfolio of work, with a printed component to compliment the photographs–from newspapers, to zines, to books, and an exhibition titled, It’s Personal,  that opens this Friday, September 28th, at the Julia Dean Gallery in Hollywood, CA.

Needless to say I am incredibly proud of their efforts, their breakthroughs, and their ability to articulate the world around them through imagery and thought. The exhibition, It’s Personal, reflects personal explorations of subjects that are meaningful to the artists. A big congratulations to all.

Here are the featured 13:

Nancy Baron’s Walking in LA is a series of photographs, which document hiking culture in Bronson
Canyon in Los Angeles. Baron’s lush gold-and-green-toned images capture the natural beauty that lies
minutes from urban streets. Titles reflect overheard conversation at the site.

 Can I Get Closer to The Hollywood Sign? © Nancy Baron

 She Dumped Me as Soon as We Signed the Lease ©Nancy Baron





Marjorie Salvaterra’s Her is an examination of the psychology of age and gender. Marjorie’s self reflection on her many roles and expectations as a woman are redirected through surreal interpretations and exaggerated gestures, in portraits that are evocative of Italian cinema. Marjorie has created photographs that reflect the universal idea of womanhood and assure HER that she is not on this path alone.
Eve Unraveled, 2012 ©Marjorie Salvaterra






The Weight of Water, 2012 © Marjorie Salvaterra


Marian Crostic’s Ethereal Paris is a continuation from her popularTimeless Paris projects and books. Shot
in early winter to early spring at the break of dawn, Marian captures a sense of stillness within the
hustle bustle of the City of Lights. Ethereal Paris focuses on the grandeur and geometrical shapes of
gardens, particularly Le Jardin Des Tuileries and Le Jardin Du Luxemberg.

 Big Wheel, Paris ©Marian Crostic

 Windows, Jardin Des Tuileries ©Marian Crostic

Noelle Swan Gilbert’s Wide Awake and Breathing is a series of landscapes and scenes in muted colors
and tones that captures the feeling of waking up and learning to breathe again after living through a
grieving period.

 Taking a Break  ©Noelle Swan Gilbert

Wide Awake © Noelle Swan Gilbert





Bootsy Holler’s The Visitor reinterprets intimate family snapshots while exploring time and blurring boundaries and as a way to comprehend her heritage by placing herself into each photograph. She has begun to have an understanding of how she was created over generations.
©Bootsy Holler


©Bootsy Holler



Cathy Immordino’s Another World is a reflection on Cathy’s feelings as an outsider in the world she lives in. Transforming landscapes found here on earth into other worldly realms. She challenges the viewer to think outside the truth of their reality. A second project, Fuck Hollywood, looks at the double edged sword of life in Hollywood.
Other World ©Cathy Immordino

Meta Hollywood ©Cathy Immordino



Jamie Johnson’s One World combines her two worlds of photography into one. On one side she is
a family and child portraitist, on the other she is a world traveler exploring other cultures through a
lens. Within her vast inventory of images Jamie has discovered a universality of human nature and
experience. One World features two photographs captured years apart and without connection but
showing similarities that speak a powerful truth about who we are. None of the photographs were staged to reflect another image.

Nomad Mom/Soccer Mom ©Jamie Johnson

Teenage Girl, Cambodia/Teenage Girl, California  ©Jamie Johnson

Gray Malin’s A La Plague, A La Piscine captures the essence of the world of pools and beaches.
Shooting from door-less helicopters, Gray has used the dynamic vacation destinations of the United
States, Brazil and Australia as his canvas, creating a visual celebration of color, light, shape – and
summer bliss.

©Gray Malin
©Gray Malin

Claire Mallett’s Drawn By Color is a love letter to the European Masters using the female figure.
Using window light in much the same way as the painters did centuries before. Each portrait uses a
predominant color to evoke a particular mood and atmosphere of self reflection.

 Dune ©Claire Mallett
Ochre© Claire Mallett



Bob Bright’s Big Sur has transformed his recent trips to Big Sur into breath taking landscapes that impart the sense of wonder that greets him each time he finds a spectacular view. Bob encourages everyone to visit the Carmel, Monterey area and to see Point Lobos.
 ©Bob Bright

©Bob Bright
  

Lisa McCord’s A Southern Family is a reflection of her growing up in the south. Which she remarks,
is very different than growing up anywhere else. The unique social norms of the south colored our life
with richness that made us who we are.

Granny playing [email protected] Lisa McCord

Granddaddy in [email protected] Lisa McCord




Ashly Stohl’s History Will Absolve Me, challenges the perception that Cuba has been frozen in time
since the embargo. She seeks to capture the decline of a once flourishing culture and convey the
human cost of the tensions between the United States and Cuba.

© Ashly Stohl

© Ashly Stohl



Alison Turner’s Bingo Culture is series of portraits taken in Bingo halls all across America. Alison
doesn’t photograph strangers she photographs new friends, she takes time to connect with her
subjects, “I truly care about each person I meet and I enjoy listening to their stories”. She realized she
was looking at a cultural phenomenon that will be lost in order to make way for new technologies in
gaming and social interaction. Once these dedicated players pass on, so will the bingo halls as we see
them today.

Christmas Bingo in Colorado 2011©Alison Turner

Woman with a Bingo Card Stack, 2010  ©Alison Turner

Eric Breitenbach

Eric Breitenbach has had many years behind a lens; he’s been a still photographer for over thirty years and a filmmaker for more than
fifteen.  In that time he has accrued a roster of exhibitions around the world and films and videos that have appeared on National Geographic Explorer, The Sundance Channel, The Sci-Fi Channel, Lifetime Real Women, America’s Health Network, PBS, and Florida Public Television. His still photographs
have been published in The
New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, Details, Doubletake, Information Week,
Labor’s Heritage, Essence,
and
Orlando
magazines. In addition, his photographs are held in many public and corporate collections. Eric is a Senior Professor at The Southeast Center For Photographic Studies at Daytona State College, teaching courses in photography, film, and video.

So what does this remarkable resume reflect?  It reflects a person that sees the world in a profound way, with photographic projects that range from the Election of 2012 to the Cows of India, to films that explore cultures and communities (be sure to take a look at Little Monks on his site).  His work reminds us of our humanity and our connectedness.  I am featuring two of Eric’s series, Portraits and the Rural South.


Portraits
For as long as I’ve been a photographer I’ve been compelled to make portraits. My
goal is to discover something universal about a person—something someone can
recognize and even identify with. The trick is to then depict that successfully
in a photograph.

Every photograph is a test–of both intellect and
aesthetics.

Rural South 
Observing the landscape and architecture of the rural south, I learned that beauty
can be found not just in things that are shiny and bright, but also in things
that are dark and decomposing.

A black basketball goal in a landscape of winter
weeds and bare trees—now that’s beautiful.

Cruel and Unusual @ Noorderlicht

© YANA PAYUSOVA - Holy Trinity - Holy Ghost, 2004

© YANA PAYUSOVA – Holy Trinity – Holy Ghost, 2004

The Cruel and Unusual exhibition that opens at the Noorderlicht Gallery in Groningen tomorrow is a rare breed. This is a project that started out (and still lives) on the internet, became a road trip across America, and is now both a newspaper and an exhibition. With work by eleven different artists, Araminta de Clermont, Amy Elkins, Alyse Emdur, Christiane Feser, Jane Lindsay, Deborah Luster, Nathalie Mohadjer, Yana Payusova, Lizzie Sadin and Lori Waselchuk, the exhibition focuses on prison photography, a subject that receives very little exposure. The show is co-curated by fellow photo-bloggers Hester Keijser (Mrs Deane) and Pete Brook (Prison Photography) who write two of the most dynamic and esoteric blogs that you will find on the web (aside from the dozens of other writing, curating and photographic projects). To state the obvious, prisons are not exactly a sexy subject and the fact that they have managed to put this show together is very impressive. Instead of a ‘traditional’ exhibition catalogue, the curators have put together a newspaper (print run of 4,000 / 1.50 € per copy) in an attempt to reach more readers than an expensive photobook could (they lay out their reasons for this choice in detail here). The world of photography online can be an exasperating, sprawling mess, but the fact that it can lead to projects such as this one makes it genuinely worthwhile. I’m providing a few visuals of the work on show with this post, but if you can make it to Noorderlicht before the exhibition closes on 1 April, don’t miss this.

© AMY ELKINS - 6/44 (Not the Man I Once Was)

© AMY ELKINS – 6/44 (Not the Man I Once Was)

 

© CHRISTIANE FESER

© CHRISTIANE FESER

© NATHALIE MOHADJER - Detention cell in Muyinga, Burundi 2009

© NATHALIE MOHADJER – Detention cell in Muyinga, Burundi 2009

© ALYSE EMDUR - Anonymous Backdrop Painted in Shawangunk Correctional Facility, New York 2005- 2011

© ALYSE EMDUR – Anonymous Backdrop Painted in Shawangunk Correctional Facility, New York 2005- 2011

 

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Nadia Sablin

Nadia Sablin has a unique world view, with roots in two parts of the world. She was born in the Soviet Union and moved to the United States when she was twelve. Nadia packed her suitcase full of rich visual memories with an ability to tell stories and create portraits that allow us a window into her personal history. Nadia now divides her time between St Petersburg, Russia and New York City, where she is pursuing several photographic projects. I am featuring two of those projects, Two Sisters and Together and Alone.

Two Sisters: In 1952, my grandfather began to lose his vision as a result of being wounded in WWII. Wanting to return to the place where he grew up, he found an unoccupied hill in a village in the Leningrad region of Russia, close to his brothers, sisters and numerous cousins. He took his house apart, log by log, and floated it down the Oyat river to its new location and reconstructed it. This house, with no running water or heat, is the place where my father and his siblings grew up, each moving to the big city after finishing school.

Now, more than half a century later, the house still stands, occupied by two of my aunts in the warmer months. They plant potatoes, bring water from the well, and chop wood for heating the stove. For the last three years, I’ve spent the summer in the village, photographing my aunts’ quiet occupations, and the small world surrounding them. Their life spent in the routine of chores, handiwork and puzzles seems untouched by the passage of time.

Together and Alone:I was conceived, mistakenly, as a twin, although nobody knew this but me. There were two of us, in the womb, identical from our underdeveloped heads to our microscopic toes. She was a Russian girl, just like me, a secretly Jewish Russian girl, prone to emotion, impatient, bookish. She hid. I knew her well before we left. We conspired on hot days in the village, outwitted the demons in the marshes, looked for treasure among the reeds. We parted ways in ’92, when I was brought to greener pastures, great-grandmother’s pillows and iron skillet in tow. She is still breathing magic. She, the other one, is beautiful. Her braid is down to her feet like my aunties’.

Our life packed in six check-in suitcases, three carry-ons. I was alone here in your new world, so I tried to replicate her, mold her out of my mother, out of American girls, out of mirrors. I search for her in images by Dutch painters, in stories by Marquez and Bulgakov. She lives off drywall, in an attic, in a well; she ascended to heaven, she is a mother by now, she walks the outskirts of St. Petersburg as a whore, she is still a child, while I’ve grown bigger, and am good at paying my bills on time.

She brushes her hair one hundred times before bed. A wolf guards her virtue. I see her in the eyes of strangers. Her gestures overtake theirs for a split second, and she is gone before they know what has happened. With my trap, I wait for her to appear there, and if I’m quick enough, if I press the button at the right moment, none of this will be real. We will be together again, she and I, conspirators, sisters, laughers of derisive laughter, whole.

Photographer #397: Ikuru Kuwajima

Ikuru Kuwajima, 1984, Japan, is a photojournalist and documentary photographer. He studied photojournalism at the University of Missouri. After his studies in the USA he moved to Romania to work on various photographic projects. He relocated to the Ukraine and is currently based in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. In Astana, the second coldest capital in the world, he focused on inner tropical resorts and recreational facilities themed with palm trees. He shows the contrasts of the unique winter urbanscape of the oil rich capital. Other projects have concentrated on the traditions of Cossacks, the conflict of the Uzbeks and Kyrgyz, an ethnic group in Tajikistan called the Yagnobi and drug addicts in the Ukraine amongst others. The following images come from the series Astana’s Winter Urbanscape, Cossack Revival in Crimea and Ukraine Drug.

Website: www.ikurukuwajima.com

Zoe Crosher Named LACMA Art Here and Now Artist

Since 1963, LACMA has supported local emerging artists, first with the Young Talent Award, then in 1986 with the Art Here and Now (AHAN) program. This year, one of the two recipients of the prestigious award is Aperture-featured photographer Zoe Crosher. Carefully selected by LACMA’s Modern and Contemporary Art Council (MCAC) as well as the museum’s Modern and Contemporary Art curators, nine unique images from Crosher’s The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois have now been acquired for LACMA’s permanent collection.

 

Zoe Crosher is an artist living in Los Angeles. Her work has been exhibited in Vancouver, Rotterdam, Los Angeles, and New York City, including a billboard project with LAXART (2010) and inclusion in the 2010 California Biennial. She has been working on Los Angeles-inspired, site-specific photographic projects since 2001. Her monograph Out the Window (LAX) examines space and transience around the Los Angeles airport, and a series of four monographs on her newest project, The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois, are forthcoming from Aperture Ideas. Crosher has just been announced as a 2011 recipient of LACMA’s prestigious Art Here and Now: Studio Forum (AHAN) program to support acquisitions by emerging Los Angeles-area artists. She holds a B.A. in Art & Politics from UC Santa Cruz, and an M.F.A. in Photography & Integrated Media from CalArts.

 

The project  The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois is also a print-on-demand limited-edition artist book. It is the first in a four-volume set by the artist, and part of Aperture Ideas: Writers and Artists on Photography, a series devoted to the finest critical and creative minds exploring key concepts in photography, including new technologies of production and dissemination.

 

Identical in structure, each volume offers an alternate perspective on the archive of Michelle duBois, an enigmatic collection of images bequeathed to the artist by the subject and compiler. In each subsequent volume, Crosher configures a new set of identities and meanings for this ephemeral archive of photographic detritus through a selection of unique sets of images, reinterpretations of photos seen in previous volumes, as well as new texts.

 

Zoe Crosher’s The Unraveling of Michelle duBois is a reconsidered archive culled from crates, boxes and albums consisting of endless flirtatious smiles, tourist shots, cheesecake mementos and suggestive poses in every film type and size. This limited-edition artist book includes a unique to the volume 8 x 10-inch signed and numbered print. The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois was featured in Aperture magazine, issue 198.

 

 

Photographer #330: Fernando Moleres

Fernando Moleres, 1963, Spain, is a socially engaged photojournalist based in Barcelona. He started his working career as a nurse. In the beginning of his photographic career he combined his nursing work with long periods travelling and doing photographic projects. He travels extensively to various countries in Africa, the Middle-East and Asia covering stories on gender inequality, various forms of religion, traditional bathing rituals and juveniles in prison. In 2000 he released Stolen Childhood showing the story of child labour in black and white photographs. In 2009 his monograph about monastic life called Lifes of Devotion came out. For his recent series Juveniles in Prison he was awarded the Daily Life Series award by World Press Photo in 2011. The following images come from the series Juveniles in Prison, Monastic Life and Turkish Baths-Hammam.

Website: www.fernandomoleres.com

Photographer #330: Fernando Moleres

Fernando Moleres, 1963, Spain, is a socially engaged photojournalist based in Barcelona. He started his working career as a nurse. In the beginning of his photographic career he combined his nursing work with long periods travelling and doing photographic projects. He travels extensively to various countries in Africa, the Middle-East and Asia covering stories on gender inequality, various forms of religion, traditional bathing rituals and juveniles in prison. In 2000 he released Stolen Childhood showing the story of child labour in black and white photographs. In 2009 his monograph about monastic life called Lifes of Devotion came out. For his recent series Juveniles in Prison he was awarded the Daily Life Series award by World Press Photo in 2011. The following images come from the series Juveniles in Prison, Monastic Life and Turkish Baths-Hammam.

Website: www.fernandomoleres.com