Tag Archives: Photographic Medium

Re Runs: Andrew Sanderson

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Andrew Sanderson that ran in 2009.


Andrew Sanderson has been a professional photgrapher for over two decades and “has established an international reputation as both teacher and practitioner of the photographic medium.” He’s also an author of three books, Night Photography, Hand Colouring and Alternative Darkroom Processes, and Home Photography. His articles can be found in magazines such as AG, Camera and Creative Photography, Photo Art International, and Black and White Magazine UK. He also has a blog, The Darkroom.

Andrew has an uncanny abililty create timeless images, where one finds difficulity in pinpointing they decade they reflect. He is an Ilford master printer, is recognized as the leading practitioner of the paper negative process and one of the world’s best hand colorists, and well known for his night photography.

Images from Night
Images from Children

Yaakov Israel: The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey

I am always thrilled for photographers whose work I feature and then write back a year or two later that their project has been realized in book form. Yaakov Israel is one of those fortunate photographers. I featured his work almost two years ago and I am happy to share that Schilt Publishing has just released his monograph, The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey. The book is currently available in Europe and will be release in the US and Canada in September/October 2012. It can be purchased directly from Schlit if desired.

Yaakov Israel lives in Jerusalem, Israel and that fact informs much of the work he creates. Yaakov received a B.F.A in photography, from the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design and his work has been shown in solo exhibitions in Israel at the Tel-Hai Museum of Photography and the Haifa Museum of Art. He has participated in a variety of group show and is currently a teacher of photography at leading photography collages and institutions in Israel.

Congratulations Yaakov! How did the book come about?

I started the Q.M.W.D in 2002, from the beginning I knew I wanted to build this body of work in a different way from the other bodies of work I was working on. The other projects were based on the idea of accumulating images that were done in the same visual language and thus defined the idea, content and story. The narrative in the Quest evolved around the idea of connecting images that were about an idea, images that were done in a verity of visual languages. In a way I was learning to use the photographic medium in a different way. I hoped that the images would connect around the context of the story. After a few years of work I reached the understanding that the kind of narrative I was pursuing would convey itself best in book form, so I started editing my images with this thought in mind. Then I started to look for a publisher that would be interested in the work and was extremely lucky that Maarten Schilt took an interest in it.

What have you learned from seeing “the Past, Present, and Future” all at once?

This is a sentence from my statement about the work. I wrote it after a specific experience. While viewing a scene I was about to shoot I observed visible fragments from the past, the present and in a way the future that may emerge (at least in my imagination). I can’t really say that I learned anything; I don’t photograph with an objective to learn. In a way photography is an excuse to stop and look at the world. I photograph what I find interesting and try to convey the experience in the image.

What has informed you most about Israel? Do you see it differently after this project?

I wasn’t informed by anything but my personal history, experience and understanding of my country. I can say that in the last 10 years I bumped into many extremely nice and helpful people from all origins, nationalities and political backgrounds, these encounters with people and places are very much at the core of this project.

Describe a typical shooting day–are you hiking, sitting and waiting, exploring?

Usually my shooting day starts at about 04:00 in the morning. I head out in my car in a direction I had decided on beforehand and I just stop when I get a hunch, or if something caches my eye. Usually I walk a lot but I wouldn’t call this hiking, my cameras are very heavy, so I try to avoid lugging them for too long or too far. Occasionally I do climb up or down a hill to get to the spot that I think is interesting to me. I rarely reach my original destination; too many interesting things stop me on the way. Sometimes I try to start again from where I stopped before, in these cases I usually drift off in a new direction. For me the journey is the important aspect not getting to a specific destination. I find that once I know what I am looking for it presents itself everywhere.

What camera do you shoot with?

Most of my work is done with an old 8×10 inch camera and sometimes with a 4×5. I like working with a big camera as it slows me down, so I make less mistakes not to mention the fact that people are more willing to stop and participate when they see the big camera (they understand the importance to me so a lot of the time they will let me make a portrait even if it is time consuming). I also carry with me a 6×17 that a friend was kind enough to lend me and I enjoy using when it suits my vision.

What’s next?

I’ve got a few ideas I’m thinking of, but simultaneously I’m going to finish up my other two projects that I’ve been working on in the last decade. I assume this will take a few more years…

What took your career to the next level?

I find it difficult to answer this question. I guess I just really believed in what I was doing and kept working hard and never compromising.

What advice can you give for emerging photographers?

I would advise any emerging photographer to simply find a theme that is of real interest to him, and stick to it no matter what the trends of the day happen to be. I find that photography I’m interested in always reflects how fascinated the photographer was in its making.

And finally, what would be your perfect day?

There are many options to answer this Q as I enjoy and cherish many things, but I will share with you a day I experienced mid winter 2011.

It was a very rainy day and I was driving Emanuel, my 6 year old son to kindergarten when the mobile rang. A friend was on the phone telling me that the weather was getting better and urging me to take the day off and go walkabout. Emanuel caught on to this and immediately said:”I’m coming with you”. After a second’s thought I said ‘why not?’ so I turned the car around headed home, collected the camera and some food and we headed out. I can’t say I made as many exposures as I usually do per day, but we had a tremendous time arriving home late at night muddy and happy.

Standing on an abandoned bunker top, on the Jordanian border, completely covered in mud and nibbling a piece of bread Emanuel quoted a cartoon he loves: “we went till infinity and beyond!”

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution @ Daniel Blau Gallery, London

We are getting very excited here in the studio about this upcoming exhibition of vintage, anonymous, vernacular and spirit photography,also including works by Fratelli Alinari,Cecil Beaton, Rene Barthelemy, Emil Cadoo,Arthur Conan Doyle, JH Engstrom, Walker Evans, Michael Grieve, Bill Jacobson, Fritz Lang, Rut Blees Luxemburg, Floris Neususs, Arnold Newman, Diane Pernet, Leni Riefenstahl, Jeffrey Silverthorne, Edmund Teske, U.S. Army Picture Corps et al. assistir filmes online .

“They are moving because of their phantom condition; every act they execute may be their last; there is not a face that is not on the verge of dissolving like a face in a dream.” Jorge Luis Borges

Daniel Blau Gallery, London will be presenting a unique set of images that embody a theme particularly relevant to current artistic and cultural practice: that of the haunted, the blurred and the dissolved. To exemplify these themes this exhibition will feature vintage prints as well as more recent explorations in photography and its often-dissolute processes. In homage to the alchemy and chemistry of photography, this show will illustrate fire, smoke, the spirit, the x-ray, blur and motion, decay and the photogram. Like a series of dark objects and entities trapped behind the framing of glass, the gallery space becomes a chapel to the haunted history of the photographic medium.

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution
2 September 8 October 2011
Opening: 1 Sept, 6-10pm
Daniel Blau Gallery, London

To coincide with this, the gallery will be hosting talks and lectures that relate to the concept of the exhibition. If you would like to attend one or all of the following events, please RSVP to: london(at)danielblau(dot)com Tickets are 5, payable on arrival at the gallery. All the events open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start. 51 Hoxton Square, London N16PB.

Tuesday 6 September: Talks

Jeffrey Silverthorne in conversation with Brad Feuerhelm / Michael Grieve in conversation with Aaron Schuman.

Tuesday 20 September: Lecture

David Bate presents some ideas related to the exhibition with a following discussion.

Not to be missed!

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution @ Daniel Blau Gallery, London

We are getting very excited here in the studio about this upcoming exhibition of vintage, anonymous, vernacular and spirit photography,also including works by Fratelli Alinari,Cecil Beaton, Rene Barthelemy, Emil Cadoo,Arthur Conan Doyle, JH Engstrom, Walker Evans, Michael Grieve, Bill Jacobson, Fritz Lang, Rut Blees Luxemburg, Floris Neususs, Arnold Newman, Diane Pernet, Leni Riefenstahl, Jeffrey Silverthorne, Edmund Teske, U.S. Army Picture Corps et al.

“They are moving because of their phantom condition; every act they execute may be their last; there is not a face that is not on the verge of dissolving like a face in a dream.” Jorge Luis Borges

Daniel Blau Gallery, London will be presenting a unique set of images that embody a theme particularly relevant to current artistic and cultural practice: that of the haunted, the blurred and the dissolved. To exemplify these themes this exhibition will feature vintage prints as well as more recent explorations in photography and its often-dissolute processes. Philadelphia auto body repair . In homage to the alchemy and chemistry of photography, this show will illustrate fire, smoke, the spirit, the x-ray, blur and motion, decay and the photogram. Like a series of dark objects and entities trapped behind the framing of glass, the gallery space becomes a chapel to the haunted history of the photographic medium.

Haunting the Chapel: Photography and Dissolution
2 September 8 October 2011
Opening: 1 Sept, 6-10pm
Daniel Blau Gallery, London

To coincide with this, the gallery will be hosting talks and lectures that relate to the concept of the exhibition. If you would like to attend one or all of the following events, please RSVP to: london(at)danielblau(dot)com Tickets are 5, payable on arrival at the gallery. All the events open at 7pm for a 7:30pm start. 51 Hoxton Square, London N16PB.

Tuesday 6 September: Talks

Jeffrey Silverthorne in conversation with Brad Feuerhelm / Michael Grieve in conversation with Aaron Schuman.

Tuesday 20 September: Lecture

David Bate presents some ideas related to the exhibition with a following discussion.

Not to be missed!

Melinda Gibson

It’s hard to ignore a statement like: “I am interested in the changing perspectives of the photographic medium, how images are viewed and understood through the technological advances in photography and the help and hindrances this begins forth into our contemporary culture.” It’s pretty clear from her statement that Melinda Gibson is looking at photography in a new way. Her images are wonderfully complex and layered, and allow us to question reality.

Melinda was born in the UK, and currently lives and works in London. She studied Photography at the London College of Communication and after graduating in 2006 she assisted various photographers, notably Martin Parr and Wolfgang Tillmans, while continuing to develop her own photographic practice. In 2010, The Magenta Foundation selected her, as one of the British winners of the Emerging Photographers Award and Melinda is 1 of the 15 winners of the annual Talent Call chosen by FOAM magazine in 2010. Melinda is participating in the European Capital of Culture exhibition, “Alice in Wonderland” Finland’s largest contemporary photography exhibition held in Turku, Finland throughout 2011.

The Photograph as Contemporary Art: This series of work titled, “The Photograph as Contemporary Art” examines the educational text by Charlotte Cotton. Through the medium of photomontage, each piece is a trio of imagery removed from the book and re-contextualised as one. This body of work brings forth questions surrounding our educational system, copyright and licensing as well as audience participation.

Photomontage III, (taken from pages 106,136,202), (2009-2010)

As the publication of imagery continues digitally, every image can be searched for, clicked on, cut, copy, pasted. Yet a book manages to hold onto its copyright, as by law you may only reproduce 10% of the entire volume. What becomes apparent is the canonisation of imagery found in such sources, the same photographers, images appear and re-appear.

Photomontage IV, (taken from pages 6,18,185), (2009-2010)

This sameness is only reiterated through the educational system bound to our institutions. These textbooks that are presented to us, to hold dear, do little to expel such problems. Or do they?

Photomontage V, (taken from pages 87,147,120), (2009-2010)

Taking such texts apart helps to really question this canonisation, far more than when they are within the constraints of a book. By slicing, cutting, composing these images against one another, you de-contextualise them, recreate them into new dismembered realities.

Photomontage VI, (taken from pages 74,99,176), (2009-2010)

Each piece is composed of three separate parts, where the same sized images are manipulated into one; placed under or over one another, parts have been removed, discarded while others have been added. Each image is an appropriation of an original, re-organised with additional elements that makes itself into a new original. Through this deconstruction you start to gain a greater appreciation of the works and start understanding why and how these photographers, these images have become so prominent.

Photomontage VII, (taken from pages 71,106,204), (2009-2010)

Photomontage VIII, (taken from pages 40,123,146), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XII, (taken from pages 153,169,178), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XVI, (taken from pages 133,169,196), (2009-2010),

Photomontage XVII, (taken from pages 25,105, 149), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XVII, (taken from pages 25,105, 149), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XIX, (taken from pages 128, 179,192), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XX, (taken from pages 103, 193,194), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XXII, (taken from pages 17,182,195), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XXVIII, (taken from pages 24, 58, 131), (2009-2010)

Photomontage XXX, (taken from pages 37, 42, 46), (2009-2010)


Breaking Boundaries: Manjari Sharma’s Darshan

I realize we’ve had a bit of a hiatus lately over here on TPP, but I’m pulled out of retirement by some really staggering work by Manjari Sharma. In this age of instagram, it’s rare to see something truly new and groundbreaking, especially as it pertains to the photographic medium itself.

Enter Manjari Sharma’s Darshan. Named for a Sanskrit word which means “sight”, “vision” or “view, Manjari’s new project seeks to photographically recreate nine classical images of Hindu Gods and Goddesses. These icons are deeply connected to Sharma’s spiritual upbringing. By melding them with her reverence and devotion to photography, she is creating altars of her own.

You’ll never believe what goes into making these images. It’s a full-on production of costume designers, set stylists, jewelry designers, carpenters and painters. Sharma believes art is much about the process, and this is one hell of a process.

This is the first image, Maa Laxmi, the goddess of wealth, good fortune, and prosperity.

Here is more about the project, and an amazing behind-the-scenes look at the work as it is created:

Darshan from Manjari Sharma on Vimeo.

PLEASE consider donating to Sharma’s project. These images ought to be created. Click here and help out! You can even receive a signed, editioned print. Totally worth it, this is an excellent use of Kickstarter.

Here is more from Sharma in her own words:

“I grew up in a Hindu home to parents who were quite spiritual, religious and god fearing as they would call it in India. I visited countless temples, shrines, and discourses as frequently as my parents wanted. These discourses circled around unraveling the mysteries locked in chapters of mythological enigma and tales of deities, reincarnations and astrology. The roots of hindu mythology run deep; my own experiences as a child ranged from being fascinated and enlightened to lost and still seeking. Naturally, coming back home still consists of delving back into the same routine of worship and meditation I left behind.

I moved from India to the United States in 2001 in order to pursue an undergraduate study in Fine Art Photography. The frequency with which I visited Hindu temples in what felt like my previous life, gradually got replaced with visits to art galleries, museums and studios, where creativity in all mediums of expression are revered.

This series bridges two parts of my world. Iconography in the Indian religion found in temples and scriptures are ultimately artistic representations of mythological characters. Most hindus have seen the use of painting and sculpture but rarely photography taken to the level of exacting measures with respect to showcasing deities. The creation of these images has become my act of devotion, to art and to religion.”

Go to Manjari Sharma’s site.

Go to Kickstarter and be inspired.

Photographer #307: Jake Chessum

Jake Chessum, 1967, UK, is an editorial portrait photographer who lives and works in New York. He did a foundation course at the Central School of Art and received a degree in graphic design at the St. Martins School of Art. Jake was already concentrated on the photographic medium during his studies which resulted in him solely focusing on photography during his third year at St. Martins. After doing a vast amount of small jobs, slowly climbing the ladder, he finally moved to New York in 1999. Today Jake has had an amazing amount of celebrities in front of his camera, from Robert De Niro to 50 Cent. Amongst his clients are GQ, New York Magazine and Paper. He released two books; The New York Look Book, images on the streets of New York and Rubbish, photographs of discarted items at various locations around the world. The following images come from his portfolio People and his books Look Book and Rubbish.


Website: www.jakechessum.com

Photographer #306: Francesca Galliani

Francesca Galliani, 1962, Italy, is a fine art photographer who lives and works in New York City. At the age of 19 she moved to the United States and received a BFA at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington. She does not limit herself merely to the photographic medium and could therefore best be described as a mixed media artist. To intensify her strong images she uses the methods of painting and collage. She writes words or short sentences, adds paint and other visual objects onto the original photographs. Francesca’s work has been exhibited extensively throughout the world and has been published in a vast amount of magazines and numerous catalogues and books. The following images come from the series Transgender, Nudes and Asia.


Website: www.gallianiphoto.com