Tag Archives: Photographic Images

Trevor Paglen and The Last Pictures

© Trevor Paglen

Over the course of photographing for what would become his 2010 monograph Invisible: Covert Operations and Classified Landscapes, Trevor Paglen spent years tracking the orbit of American military spacecraft and documenting their ghostly trails across the night sky. The resulting images (which also appeared in Aperture # 191) were as much about photography itself—exploring the power and the limits of photographic knowledge—as they were meditations on the relationship between humankind and the infinite. In a fascinating evolution of this work, Paglen is now behind The Last Pictures, a project that will attach a record of human photographic images onto a satellite that will be sent into orbit in September 2012. Paglen spent five years interviewing scientists, artists, anthropologists, and philosophers to decide what images should compose this photo-historical record, and then worked with materials scientists at MIT to inscribe the 100 images he chose onto an “ultra-archival” silicon disc (not unlike the Pioneer Plaques and the Voyager Golden Record) that will be attached to EchoStar XVI. This satellite will function as a regular television satellite for the next fifteen years before powering down, entering a “graveyard orbit,” and remaining for billions of years as a photographic relic of modern human civilization for future civilizations and lifeforms to discover. And perhaps it will even show up in one of Paglen’s future photographs.

Here on earth in the year 2012, you can catch Paglen’s lecture tour (beginning September in New York) featuring philosophers and scientists discussing the project. Later this year, Creative Time will publish a book of the images, accompanied by short texts by those who contributed to the project. For more on Paglen and his work, visit his website.

David Bram and The Bram TEN

The name David Bram may sound familiar.  It’s often attached to another well known name: Fraction Magazinean online venue dedicated to fine art photography, showcasing the work of both emerging and very established fine art photographers. We often forget that many of the names that make things happen for photographers around the world are also photographers themselves, and it gives me great pleasure to shine a light on David’s new photographic venture, The Bram Ten.

David ‘s work has been exhibited throughout the U.S. and is included in several private and public collections, including the Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe. His work focuses primarily on his immediate environment in New Mexico. David lives and works in Albuquerque with his wife and two exquisite children. He is an incredible advocate for all things photographic.

The ten images below are the newest addition to the The Ten program created by the Jennifer Schwartz Gallery in Atlanta.

Images from The Bram Ten

Nearly every weekend, I drive an hour north of Albuquerque to a place just south of Santa Fe.  My in-laws have owned this nearly 100 year-old house for about 38 years and it is where my wife was born. It is a place of great comfort and a place where I love to spend time. We spend enough time there to consider it our home away from home.

Jeff Cowen: Photographic Works exhibition in Cologne

Jeff Cowen, Nature Mort 1, 2010, Silver Print, 60 x 80 cm, Edition of 6.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Nature Mort 1, 2010, Silver Print, 60 x 80 cm, Edition of 6.

For the first time, the highly-regarded Michael Werner art gallery in Cologne (with other galleries in Germany and New York), will be presenting photography-based artworks.

From the gallery statement:

Michael Werner Kunsthandel, Cologne presents an exhibition by Jeff Cowen titled “Photographic Works beginning on January 28th. The artist tests the boundaries between photography, painting, drawing and sculpture. Comcast Cable California . Cowen works on a thick silver based paper, which he cuts, collages and attacks with various chemicals and specialized darkroom techniques. The evolution from the photographic image to the unique and painterly final print may take the artist months or even years. This process is consciously controlled only to some extent, but not entirely predetermined. Cowen is on a quest for something he rationally does not understand, but senses and knows exists. His photographic images transcend time and space. He writes: “Making a photograph for me is a paradox, a sacred and violent act. You kill a moment and eternalize it. seo hosting . There is a mysterious metamorphosis that transpires of which I am continuously surprised and in awe of. Its a transformative process for the observer and the observed.

Jeff Cowen was born in 1966 in New York City. In 1988 he graduated in Oriental Studies as a University Honors Scholar from New York University and Waseda University in Tokyo. Upon graduation, he continued photographing intensively on the streets of New York and worked as an assistant to Larry Clark. In the course of the 1990s his artistic approach was influenced and altered by his study of drawing and painting. This further informed the artists search for the relation between the photographic picture and abstraction. Cowen has been based in Paris and now Berlin since 2001. The Cologne exhibition reveals works of these past ten years including still life, landscape, figure, and abstraction. In many of the works, one senses Cowens interest with what he calls the non-moment, i.e. the point in time just before or after something has happened. Cable Internet Packages . Like silence, my images can best be described by what they are not.

Jeff Cowen, Nature Morte 9, 2010, Silver Print, 81 x 61 cm, Edition of 1.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Nature Morte 9, 2010, Silver Print, 81 x 61 cm, Edition of 1.

Jeff Cowen, Sienna, 2002, Silver Print, 127 x 170 cm, Edition of 6.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Sienna, 2002, Silver Print, 127 x 170 cm, Edition of 6.

Jeff Cowen, Alice, 2001, Silver Print, 188 x 127 cm, Edition of 8.jpg

Jeff Cowen, Alice, 2001, Silver Print, 188 x 127 cm, Edition of 8.

Jeff Cowen: Photographic Works
January 28 – March 24, 2012
Michael Werner Kunsthandel Gallery
Gertrudenstrae 24-28
50667 Cologne
Germany

ReRuns: Enrique Ahumada

I have a house full of guests and am taking the day off! So am sharing a previous post on Enrique Ahumada!

Enrique Ahumada is an Argentine American who discovered the power of photographic images at an early age. Growing up in Buenos Aires, I asked Enrique what brought him to the United States. He said that after an artist friend returned to Argentina after an extended absence, I asked her what she as an artist found to be the biggest difference between Europe and the US. She told me that Europe was truly the Old World, that sometimes it seemed that everything had already been done there. While in the US, in comparison, it was like everything was in constant change, even those things that seemed to have already been done.

When I realized that I was in need of a fresh start for my life, that thought came to mind. Where else could I find a better place to nurture my passion for photography? Where else could I look for new ideas and new horizons outside and inside of me? Where else could I be challenged by such a diverse human and social tapestry? Should I move to a place where the rules were written in ancient stone or to a place where stones were meant to be broken to build new worlds?

Enrique has been working in the advertising field for many years and he has found inspiration from the art directors, artists, and photographers that surround him. His own specialty is with words, but his desire to express himself in the visual world drew him back to his childhood love of photography.

At Review LA, Enrique had one of the most clever and engaging “leave-behinds” I’ve seen. Created through Mag Cloud, Enrique created his own fashion magazine, using the images of mannequins from his series, Women In Windows. A take-off of a “W” magazine, Enrique created M (ode) magazine. It’s a smart and interesting way to present work and it’s for sale on Mag Cloud if you want to purchase a copy.

I’m featuring work from two series, Women in Windows, and Purloined. I don’t recommend Enrique’s “shoot while driving” technique used in the latter series, especially now that California has banned all forms of hand held objects (next could be the Starbucks cup) while driving.

From Women in Windows:I suppose inside every photographer lives a voyeur. A voyeur that goes beyond his basic pleasure, his primitive instincts, trying to get thrilled by capturing something– with the help of his camera, as his blind witness, and share his joy with people. We can also say that a photographer is a voyager as well. A voyager that enjoys traveling around seeing the world in a different way than the ordinary. Cropping and highlighting reality, unveiling what is hidden to the everyday viewer. Women in Windows reflects some of the impact that certain window mannequins had on my voyeur and my voyager selves. The impact of their silent feminine beauty, sometimes half naked sometimes half dressed, triggered all sorts of sensations, emotions and thoughts for me. Their sex appeal certainly tricked my eye. As I turned my head, suddenly, in a glimpse they seemed real. I could feel their presence. Actually, they were real to me for a portion of a second, like in a dream. A very exciting dream where my most secret desires take their own photographs.

From Purloined: “Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.” Confucius. Driving is embracing the traffic and erasing everything else. We commute to forget the experience of the rest of the world. As in Edgar Allan Poe’s “The purloined letter,” beauty is out there hidden in plain sight. We look at it but we just can’t see it. This series of photographs, which I took while driving, is a first attempt to reconnect with the world around me. To restore the idea of appreciating the ride rather than just my final destination. To acknowledge the existence of beauty out of my bubble on wheels. Enjoying the light bathing a well designed building. Or being surprised by people or an unusual sign or graffiti. Beauty is out there. Shouldn’t I unveil it?

The Lensculture International Exposure Awards

Today is the deadline for the Lensculture International Exposure Awards.
Lens Culture International Exposure Awards discover, reward, and promote talented, new, emerging and established photographers and multimedia creators from around the world.

We’re looking for exciting work from every continent, and from diverse points of view: documentary, fine art, nature, photojournalism, activism, street photography, sports, fashion, poetic, personal, abstract and human.

A stellar international jury of photography experts will review and judge every entry submitted.

DEADLINE for entries is TODAY!

Three Categories for Awards in 2011:

Multimedia Awards
This year, we introduce an important new category to the Awards competition — Multimedia.

Presentations that combine photography, video, graphics and sound are becoming prominent headline features in the world of social networking, activism, fine art, and online news. Photographers are taking more and more control over how their work is edited, produced and presented. And we want to discover who is creating the most engaging multimedia projects today.

Multimedia from all genres and categories will be considered, including, but not limited to: current events / photojournalism / social issues / activism / fine art / conceptual / cinematic / fiction / storytelling / nature / other.

Maximum length should be 8 minutes. If your full-length multimedia piece is longer than 8 minutes, please submit an edit, or a trailer or teaser of 8 minutes or shorter. You can also submit one still image plus a link to your multimedia. The link should be part of your artist’s statement. Winners will be shown in their full original length. Entry fee: $75.

Portfolio Awards

Submit 10 to 15 photographic images that work well together as a group — thematically, aesthetically, as a story, or simply as a range of your photographic talent. Edit your selections carefully, since this category will be judged on the strength of the group of photographs as a whole, and not as individual photographs. Entry fee: $75.

Single Image Awards
Often, a single powerful photograph captures our attention as important, artistic, meaningful, and memorable. A great photo can stand on its own, demonstrating a remarkable level of visual perception, sensitivity, and creativity. Photographs of all genres and all categories are welcome. Entry fee: $35.

25 Honorable Mention Award

25 Honorable Mention photographs or multimedia (chosen by the judges from all categories) will win prominent placement of a single image on the Award Winner’s Page in Lens Culture, including a link to your own personal or professional website. PLUS publication in our deluxe 2011 International Exposure Awards Winners catalog, and the possibility of participation in public exhibitions and screenings around the world.

The Lensculture International Exposure Awards

Today is the deadline for the Lensculture International Exposure Awards.
Lens Culture International Exposure Awards discover, reward, and promote talented, new, emerging and established photographers and multimedia creators from around the world.

We’re looking for exciting work from every continent, and from diverse points of view: documentary, fine art, nature, photojournalism, activism, street photography, sports, fashion, poetic, personal, abstract and human.

A stellar international jury of photography experts will review and judge every entry submitted.

DEADLINE for entries is TODAY!

Three Categories for Awards in 2011:

Multimedia Awards
This year, we introduce an important new category to the Awards competition — Multimedia.

Presentations that combine photography, video, graphics and sound are becoming prominent headline features in the world of social networking, activism, fine art, and online news. Photographers are taking more and more control over how their work is edited, produced and presented. And we want to discover who is creating the most engaging multimedia projects today.

Multimedia from all genres and categories will be considered, including, but not limited to: current events / photojournalism / social issues / activism / fine art / conceptual / cinematic / fiction / storytelling / nature / other.

Maximum length should be 8 minutes. If your full-length multimedia piece is longer than 8 minutes, please submit an edit, or a trailer or teaser of 8 minutes or shorter. You can also submit one still image plus a link to your multimedia. The link should be part of your artist’s statement. Winners will be shown in their full original length. Entry fee: $75.

Portfolio Awards

Submit 10 to 15 photographic images that work well together as a group — thematically, aesthetically, as a story, or simply as a range of your photographic talent. Edit your selections carefully, since this category will be judged on the strength of the group of photographs as a whole, and not as individual photographs. Entry fee: $75.

Single Image Awards
Often, a single powerful photograph captures our attention as important, artistic, meaningful, and memorable. A great photo can stand on its own, demonstrating a remarkable level of visual perception, sensitivity, and creativity. Photographs of all genres and all categories are welcome. Entry fee: $35.

25 Honorable Mention Award

25 Honorable Mention photographs or multimedia (chosen by the judges from all categories) will win prominent placement of a single image on the Award Winner’s Page in Lens Culture, including a link to your own personal or professional website. PLUS publication in our deluxe 2011 International Exposure Awards Winners catalog, and the possibility of participation in public exhibitions and screenings around the world.

The Lensculture International Exposure Awards

Today is the deadline for the Lensculture International Exposure Awards.
Lens Culture International Exposure Awards discover, reward, and promote talented, new, emerging and established photographers and multimedia creators from around the world.

We’re looking for exciting work from every continent, and from diverse points of view: documentary, fine art, nature, photojournalism, activism, street photography, sports, fashion, poetic, personal, abstract and human.

A stellar international jury of photography experts will review and judge every entry submitted.

DEADLINE for entries is TODAY!

Three Categories for Awards in 2011:

Multimedia Awards
This year, we introduce an important new category to the Awards competition — Multimedia.

Presentations that combine photography, video, graphics and sound are becoming prominent headline features in the world of social networking, activism, fine art, and online news. Photographers are taking more and more control over how their work is edited, produced and presented. And we want to discover who is creating the most engaging multimedia projects today.

Multimedia from all genres and categories will be considered, including, but not limited to: current events / photojournalism / social issues / activism / fine art / conceptual / cinematic / fiction / storytelling / nature / other.

Maximum length should be 8 minutes. If your full-length multimedia piece is longer than 8 minutes, please submit an edit, or a trailer or teaser of 8 minutes or shorter. You can also submit one still image plus a link to your multimedia. The link should be part of your artist’s statement. Winners will be shown in their full original length. Entry fee: $75.

Portfolio Awards

Submit 10 to 15 photographic images that work well together as a group — thematically, aesthetically, as a story, or simply as a range of your photographic talent. Edit your selections carefully, since this category will be judged on the strength of the group of photographs as a whole, and not as individual photographs. Entry fee: $75.

Single Image Awards
Often, a single powerful photograph captures our attention as important, artistic, meaningful, and memorable. A great photo can stand on its own, demonstrating a remarkable level of visual perception, sensitivity, and creativity. Photographs of all genres and all categories are welcome. Entry fee: $35.

25 Honorable Mention Award

25 Honorable Mention photographs or multimedia (chosen by the judges from all categories) will win prominent placement of a single image on the Award Winner’s Page in Lens Culture, including a link to your own personal or professional website. PLUS publication in our deluxe 2011 International Exposure Awards Winners catalog, and the possibility of participation in public exhibitions and screenings around the world.

Photographer #375: Gerco de Ruijter

Gerco de Ruijter, 1961, The Netherlands, is a landscape photographer with a unique perspective. His aerial photographs are taken on a analogue camera hanging from a kite or sometimes on a long fishing rod. He studied painting and the first images were supposed to be used as studies for his artwork. He soon found the photographic images much more intriguing. One of his latest series is Baumschule and focuses on tree nurseries. The images are composed geomatrically. The distance from the subject helps to create the impression of an abstract painting. Gerco considers his best images to be those where recognizable reality meets abstraction. He has a lot of control on what will be on his photographs by making clear choices. The small part he doesn’t control is fixed by framing in a way to achieve the best result. He has traveled to Iceland, Dubai, USA and various places in Holland for his photography. The following images come from the series Baumschule, 2008-2011 and Transfer.


Website: www.gercoderuijter.com