Tag Archives: Photographic Career

The Bechers on Display at Paris Photo

The work of the photographic duo Bernd and Hilla Becher is indisputably some of the most important in modern photography. This week, a two-part exhibit at Paris Photo highlights the historical significance of the Bechers, most well known for their “typologies”—uniform, photographic studies of industrial structures such as water towers and blast furnaces.

The first part of the show, Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012, features an extensive collection of rare ephemera related to the Bechers’ work. These objects, including posters, invitations and museum catalogues, were amassed by curator and book dealer Antoine de Beaupré for more than ten years.

“You get an historical overview,” said Beaupré. “and also an evolution of how their work developed over the years, especially in the beginning.”

One highlight of the collection is the magazine Anonyme Skulpturen which was printed in 1969 to accompany an exhibition of the Bechers’ work in Düsseldorf. This work would become a monograph of the same name, published in 1970, which is also featured in the Paris show.

The printed objects collected by Beupré represent the Bechers’ work from 1964 to 1977, while a presentation of their monographs, mounted under plexiglass and affixed to the gallery walls, span from 1970 to the present day.

The second section of the Paris show features a selection of 117 photographs chosen by Hilla Becher (Bernd Becher passed away in 2007) from the 1977 book Zeche Zollern II – Photographs of Bernd & Hilla Becher. Together, these prints, objects and publications are a comprehensive tribute to the Bechers’ long and prolific photographic career.


Antoine de Beaupré is a curator and the founder of the Librairie 213 in Paris.

Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012 is on display at Paris Photo from Nov. 15 to 18.

Photographer #452: Julio Bittencourt

Julio Bittencourt, 1980, Brazil, started his photographic career in 2000 as a photographer and assistant photo editor for the newspaper Valor Economico in Sao Paulo. Since 2006 he has been working as an independant photographer. In his series In a Window of Prestes Maia 911 Building he documented the residents of possibly the largest squat in the world. The building had been vacant for over a decade. In 2003 the ‘Movement of the Homeless’ had moved in hundreds of homeless families. They created a new community who drove out the vermin and drug dealers and created workshops and a library. In 2006 the new residents were told that they would be evicted. The project was released as a book in 2008. For his project Citizen X he focused on the housing problem in Brazil again. He shows abandoned spaces that represent “both a testament to the magnitude of the problemas well as a source of potential hope for change.”  His personal project Ramos focuses on an artificial salt water lake surrounded by 15 favelas run by drug-trafficking gangs. Even though violence plagues the favelas, the park has been mostly free of problems. It is a crowded and polluted place where people enjoy the beach, sun and Brazilian rum. His work has been exhibited on numerous occasions worldwide and published in prestigious magazines as Time, Stern and GEO. The following images come from the series Ramos, Citizen X and In a Window of Prestes Maia 911 Building.


Website: www.juliobittencourt.com

Photographer #437: Pierre Crocquet de Rosemond

Pierre Crocquet, 1971, South Africa, started a career in the merchant-banking sector only to find out that his choice of career was flawed. Therefore he studied photography at the London College of Printing. He returned to South Africa and embarked on a photographic career. Since 2002 he released five books of which the latest is entitled Pinky Promise. It is an exploration into the terrain of child sexual abuse. During a period of three years Pierre combined seven stories of abuse, survival and healing in the monograph. The book breaks newground by including the stories of not only the victims, but also the perpetrators of child sexual abuse. In 2008 he released Enter Exit, a book showing the inhabitants of an isolated, small, multi-racial community. “The isolated community became a portal through which to explore facets of the human psyche.” It is a very strong collection of black and white portraits. His work has been exhibited on numerous occasions throughout the world. The following images come from the series Pinky Promise, Enter Exit and Us.


Website: www.pierrec.com

Roe Ethridge

Whilst researching for our latest issue “Thereness”, we came across a selection of videos on featured artist Roe Ethridge. In this particular interview with MoMa’s Curator of Photography, Roxana Marcoci, Ethridge discusses his experience of working in commercial photography and its influence on his personal projects, and in the process gives us an interesting insight into his unique approach to making fugues that are achieved through what he refers to as “amnesic states of wondering”.

Here is an extract from Maggie Gray’s article in issue 12 of 1000 Words:

“Roe Ethridge studied at Atlanta College of Art, after which he found work as a catalogue photographer to make ends meet, so the theme of day to day luxury and branding is one he knows well. On top of influencing his subject choices, Ethridge’s commercial experience informs the eclecticism of his style. Working to other people’s briefs throws up a host of visual and thematic scenarios. As Ethridge put it in this interview, he can photograph “a golden retriever one day and an underwear model the next.” He brings the same incongruous variety to Le Luxe: a turn of the page leads the viewer straight from bikini-clad women to a thoughtful shot of an empty maple syrup jar. Unlikely reverberations and echoes emerge throughout the book. One photograph depicts men breaking up stone slabs for the Goldman Sachs construction. In three others, similar slabs feature as impromptu ashtrays. Are they from the same source? Does it matter if they’re not, if the associations still resound? Other themes, such as Ethridge’s fascination with textural surfaces, are woven more intrinsically into the whole. His free and associative combinations deliberately reflect the heterogeneity of a photographic career – the juggling of projects, the frequent unsolicited finds and the constant casting about for inspiration. Nothing in his work happens in isolation as he draws, untethered, from his entire visual practice.

That Ethridge is prepared to include images from all areas of his work, and beyond (he regularly borrows from public sources such as newspapers and online media) is a powerful thing in itself. Some of the pictures he employs are pixelated and blurred, brazenly failing the standard tests of ‘good’ photography. But contemporary life sees a constant bombardment of images, good and poor, particularly online where they are circulated, replicated, cropped and corrupted with ease. Ethridge is one of several artists who have taken the plunge, raiding this plethora of modern photographs to create work that – to quote video artist Hito Steyerl – offers a “defence of the poor image” instead of bemoaning it. This practice of grabbing, scanning and pasting from other sources raises thorny questions of ownership and originality which Ethridge confronts with humorous candour.”

Also worth flagging up is this short interview and slideshow of Ethridge’s work created by The Photographers’ Gallery as part of the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2011 and, finally, here is an installation video of Ethridge’s exhibition Le Luxe II BHGG at the Gagosian Gallery in Beverly Hills that took place June 9 – July 21, 2011.

Photographer #391: Munem Wasif

Munem Wasif, 1983, Bangladesh, is a socially engaged photojournalist who graduated from Pathshala, South Asian Media Academy. His photographic career started as a feature photographer for the Daily Star. In 2007 Munem was selected for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass and later won the PrixPictet commission to document a water project in Bangladesh. This resulted in the series Salty Tears showing how the salt water invades the lands bringing not only destruction, but also leading to a lack of drinking water. The project was released as a book in 2011. Wasif has focused on subjects dealing with climate change and its devastating results, economic problems within Bangladesh, political refugees from Myanmar, political and ethnic crisis in the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste and the subject of religion, especially the Islam. In 2008 his book Bangladesh, Standing on the Edge was released. The following images come from the stories Tale of Lost Paradise: Climate Refugees, Bangladesh, Salty Tears and Rohingya Refugees: Illegal Immigrants from Myanmar.

Website: www.munemwasif.com & www.agencevu.com

Photographer #359: Zoriah

Zoriah Miller, 1976, USA, is a photojournalist with a large portfolio. He has covered many disaster zones, social issues and conflict zones in numerous countries. Besides his photographic career he worked as a Humanitarian Volunteer, Disaster Response Volunteer and Disaster Technology Specialist for many years. Between 2005 and 2008 he worked as an embedded military photographer and photojournalist with the US Marine Corps, US Army and the Afghan National Army. He has extensively covered the conflicts in the Gaza strip, Afghanistan and Iraq. Amongst his humanitarian clients are organizations as Unicef, The International Red Cross and Docters without Borders. His work has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers as Newsweek, The New York Times and The International Herald Tribune. Zoriah’s work is direct, socially engaged and full of emotion. The following images come from the stories Afghan National Army, Aids in Asia and Architecture of War.


Website: www.zoriah.com

Photographer #359: Zoriah

Zoriah Miller, 1976, USA, is a photojournalist with a large portfolio. He has covered many disaster zones, social issues and conflict zones in numerous countries. Besides his photographic career he worked as a Humanitarian Volunteer, Disaster Response Volunteer and Disaster Technology Specialist for many years. Between 2005 and 2008 he worked as an embedded military photographer and photojournalist with the US Marine Corps, US Army and the Afghan National Army. He has extensively covered the conflicts in the Gaza strip, Afghanistan and Iraq. Amongst his humanitarian clients are organizations as Unicef, The International Red Cross and Docters without Borders. His work has appeared in numerous magazines and newspapers as Newsweek, The New York Times and The International Herald Tribune. Zoriah’s work is direct, socially engaged and full of emotion. The following images come from the stories Afghan National Army, Aids in Asia and Architecture of War.


Website: www.zoriah.com

Photographer #346: Tiane Doan Na Champassak

Tiane Doan Na Champassak, 1973, France, started his photographic career with documentary photography. Now he focuses on fine art photography, however still concentrating on the human being as his subject. His work revolving around acts of faith and questions of identity become close to abstracts photographs. He has released various monographs for which he has traveled to many places around the world as India, Ethiopia, Burma, The Netherlands and others. His project Kolkata is scheduled to be released as a book in 2011. In the city of Calcutta he focused on the extremes; quiet and loud, clean and dirty, modern and old. The continuous duality became his leitmotiv and the reason to concentrate on street life to best represent the chaos of the huge city. The following works come from the series Spleen and Ideal, No Photo and Kolkata.

Website: www.champassak.com