Tag Archives: Photographic Art

Homage to Paul Graham: A Present, Paris

paul-graham-1.jpgpaul-graham-2.jpg

Homage to Paul Graham, A Present, Paris Jim Casper

8th Avenue and 42nd Street_16th July 2010_12-55-09pm-sm.jpg

Paul Graham, from The Present: 8th Avenue and 42nd Street, 16th July 2010, 12:55:09 pm. Fotografia . Courtesy Mack Books.

Street photography is perhaps the defining genre of photographic art. Seminal works by Walker Evans, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank and Garry Winogrand display photographys astonishing dance with life, and its unique role in forming our perceptions of the modern world.

The Present is Paul Grahams contribution to this legacy. The images in [his latest] book come unbidden from the streets of New York, but are not quite what we might expect, for each moment is brought to us with its double two images taken from the same location, separated only by the briefest fraction of time. We find ourselves in sibling worlds, where a businessman with an eye patch becomes, an instant later, a man with an exaggerated wink; a man eating a banana walks towards us, and a small focus shift reveals the blind man right behind him.

Although there are flashes of surprise a woman walks confidently down the street one moment, only to tumble to the ground a second later for the most part there is little of the drama street photography is addicted to. People arrive and depart this quiet stage, with the smallest shift of time and attention revealing where life is frozen rigid. A suited young businessman crosses the road, only to be replaced by his homeless alternate; a woman in a pink t-shirt is engulfed with tears, but seconds later there is a content shopper in her place.

The Present gives us an impression quite different to most street photography where life is frozen. Here we glimpse the continuum: before/after, coming/going, either/or. Press releases SEO . A present that is a fleeting and provisional alignment, with no singularity or definitiveness; a world of shifting awareness and alternate realities, where life twists and spirals in a fraction of a second to another moment, another world, another consciousness.

The Present is the third in Paul Grahams trilogy of projects on America which began with American Night in 2003 and was followed in 2007 by a shimmer of possibility (winner of the Paris Photo Book Prize 2011 for the most significant photo book of the past 15 years). Directory Submission . The Present takes Grahams reputation as a master of the book form to new heights, employing multiple gatefolds to convey passages of time and the unfolding of urban life.

Text from the press release for The Present, the latest photo book by Paul Graham.

Guy Sargent, Kynance Cove (Swimmers)

Guy Sargent, Kynance Cove (Swimmers)

Guy Sargent

Kynance Cove (Swimmers),
Cornwall, England, 2011
From the What Lies Beneath the Surface series
Website – GuySargent.net

Guy Sargent (b. 1965) photographs both landscape and architecture using a large format camera. He works on various ongoing projects; What Lies Beneath the Surface, London, a Personal View, Common Progress and, most recently, From here, we control everything… His work has been published in magazines such as Ag: The International Journal of Photographic Art & Practice and AV Proyectos. Exhibitions include the Royal Academy of Arts – "Summer Exhibition" 2009 and 2011 and The Association of Photographers (UK) Open Awards. His work is available from Lux Archive in New York and Wanted in Paris. He lives in London.

Rafal Milach, Sasha and Nastya

Rafal Milach, Sasha and Nastya

Rafal Milach

Sasha and Nastya,
Novosibirsk, Russia, 2008
From the 7 Rooms series
Website – RafalMilach.com

Rafal Milach is a documentary photographer based in Warsaw, Poland. He graduated from Academy of Fine Arts in Katowice, Poland and ITF in Opava, Czech Republic. For more than 10 years he has been working on transition issues in Russian speaking countries and CEE region. This work resulted with the book 7 Rooms (Kehrer Verlag 2011) and such essays as The Grey (2002), Wunderland (2006), Disappearing Circus (2008) or Black Sea of Concrete (2009). Rafal’s photos were exhibited in MoCA Shanghai and are the part of collection of Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Art in Japan. They have been also presented within Photoespana, Look3, Rencontres Photogrphiques d’Arles. In 2007 Rafal took part in Joop Swart Masterclass run by World Press Photo Foundation. He is grant recipient from Polish Ministry of Culture, European Cultural Foundaion and Visegrad Fund. His Pictures have been awarded in World Press Photo, Pictures of the Year International, Photography Book Now and New York Photo Festival Awards.

Photographer #425: Bohnchang Koo

Bohnchang Koo, 1953, South-Korea, is a fine-art and conceptual photographer based in Seoul. He first studied Business Administration at Yonsei University before studying photography in Hamburg. His work is often about impermanence, the passing of time, the disappearance and heritage. For his series Vessel he photographed rare porcelain ceramics of the Korean Joseon dynasty. He traveled to museums around the world to find and document the white objects against a white backdrop in soft light. As an “old family album” he tries to bring the objects together and retrieve the lost Korean heritage. Koo has been called “one of Korea’s most influential photographers.” Not only due to his photographic art, but also as an educator and exhibition planner he helped shape and promote Korean photography to a wider audience. He released a large number of monographs and his work has been exhibited extensively throughout the world and is found in public collections as the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Houston Museum of Fine Arts. The following images come from the series Interiors, Vessel and In the Beginning.

Website: www.bckoo.com

Photographer #420: Joël Tettamanti

Joël Tettamanti, 1977, Switzerland, is a photographer who travels to remote places around the world for his photographic art. His work is a mixture of documentary, architectural, landscape and travel photography. He has traveled to places as Togo, Kuweit, Japan, Azerbaijan, India and Greenland. His photographs are a reflection of a traveling observer who sees ordinary objects, landscapes and buildings that others would pass without noticing. In his images the ordinary becomes the extraordinary and tell the story of man and its environment. In 2006 Joël released the book Local Studies in which his work from various series is combined with texts of 6 different authors. He studied graphic design and photography at the Ecole Cantonale d’Art de Lausanne. Since 2009 he is also a photography teacher at ECAL. His work has been exhibited extensively, mainly in Switzerland and France. The following images come from the series Ayome, Qaqortoq and Harajuku.

Website: www.tettamanti.chwww.tettamanti.li

1000 Words Photography Magazine #12

I am delighted to inform you that issue 12 of 1000 Words “Thereness” is now available to view online at www.1000wordsmag.com

Featuring portfolios from Lonie Hampton, Chris Shaw, Maja Forsslund, Rinko Kawauchi, Ordinary Light Photography and Roe Ethridge alongside in-depth interviews, essays and reviews by Louise Clements, Simon Baker, Lucy Davies, Natasha Christia, Brad Feuerhelm and Margaret Gray, 1000 Words attempts to show a kind of photography that draws directly and honestly from life; work that does not fit neatly into categories yet which can be infinitely more rigorous and fresher than any attempts at visual gimmickry made by the latest tricks of the trade.

In line with this, we also cover new titles from Andy Sewell, C Photo and Enrique Metinides in the dedicated books section courtesy of texts from Michael Grieve, Oliver Whitehead and Daniel Campbell Blight.

“[…]’Thereness’ is a sense of the subject’s reality, a heightened sense of its physicality, etched sharply into the image. It is a sense that we are looking at the world directly, without mediation. Or rather, that something other than a mere photographer is mediating. […] Such a feeling, such alertness, when present in the photograph, can of course conceal the greatest photographic art. ‘Thereness’ is seen at the opposite ends of the photographic spectra, in the humblest holiday enprint as much as the most serious art photograph, in the snapshot-inspired, dynamic small camera candid as much as the calm, meditative, large camera view. Those photographs which conjure up a compelling desire to touch the subject, to walk into the picture, to know the photographed person, display ‘thereness’. Those photographs which tend towards impressionism, expressionism or abstraction can be in danger of losing it, or never finding it […]. winrar setup download . ‘Thereness’, in short, is a quality that has everything to do with reality and little to do with art, yet is, I would reiterate, the essence of the art of photography”.

From The Art That Hides Itself – Notes on Photography’s Quiet Genius by Gerry Badger

Thanks to all the photographers, writers and editorial and production team as well as of course our advertisers for contributing to yet another fantastic issue of 1000 Words.

Enjoy dear readers, and please take note of our new studio address: 1000 Words Photography Ltd, 29 The Arthaus, 205 Richmond Road, London, E8 3FF

Christine Caldwell

Several years ago, I featured Christine Caldwell’s Illuminated Negatives of flowers on Lenscratch. She has a new body of work using the same approach, Ocean, that is on exhibition in Los Angeles in two locations. Her unique and unusual approach to image making, all done without a camera in the darkroom, allows for spectacular results.

Christine was born in St. Louis, Missouri and attended the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. In the years since obtaining her degree, Christine mastered color and black & white darkroom techniques, which have made her
a highly sought after darkroom professional–in fact, she manages on of the best darkrooms in Los Angeles, Translight Photography Center. Her work will be on display at Translight this weekend for the Brewery 2011 Fall ArtWalk. This work is also on exhibition at the G2 Gallery in Venice, CA through November 6th, 2011. The G2 Gallery supports art and the environment and believes in the union between environmental causes and the power of photographic art to change the world.

Christine has expanded the potential of the photogram—the process of creating an image using light and photo sensitive paper, minus the camera and film—by pioneering the use of the color enlarger and color paper to manipulate the look of the final product. The process of creating a photogram is inherently experimental and demands many tries before producing satisfactory results, which Christine describes it as, “an endorphin rush” for its unpredictability. When testing out new materials for her Ocean series, Christine says that in general, “small, transluscent type materials work the best.” In working with nature’s smaller creations, Christine hopes that her series will spark “a greater appreciation for their intricate beauty.”

Images from Ocean

‘Thereness’

Get ready for issue 12 of 1000 Words, ‘Thereness’, out 1 October.

“[…] More often than not, a direct, ‘simple’ record of the subject in hand – the way of the ‘quiet’ photographer – produces a result that is more profoundly fresh than any attempt at visual novelty made by utilising the many tricks of the trade. If photography deals directly and honesty with life, it has every chance to be fresh and ‘new’, for the surface of life itself is infinitely variable, renewable and renewing. […] The concreteness of photography, its awkward specificity, *must* surely be its glory, for can we ever tire of looking at a tree, the sky, a human face?

[…]’Thereness’ is a sense of the subject’s reality, a heightened sense of its physicality, etched sharply into the image. It is a sense that we are looking at the world directly, without mediation. Or rather, that something other than a mere photographer is mediating. […] Such a feeling, such alertness, when present in the photograph, can of course conceal the greatest photographic art. ‘Thereness’ is seen at the opposite ends of the photographic spectra, in the humblest holiday enprint as much as the most serious art photograph, in the snapshot-inspired, dynamic small camera candid as much as the calm, meditative, large camera view. zales outlet . Those photographs which conjure up a compelling desire to touch the subject, to walk into the picture, to know the photographed person, display ‘thereness’. Those photographs which tend towards impressionism, expressionism or abstraction can be in danger of losing it, or never finding it […]. family court . ‘Thereness’, in short, is a quality that has everything to do with reality and little to do with art, yet is, I would reiterate, the essence of the art of photography”

From The Art That Hides Itself – Notes on Photography’s Quiet Genius by Gerry Badger