Tag Archives: Photographer

Thomas Bouquin, Mur de garrigue

Thomas Bouquin, Mur de garrigue

Thomas Bouquin

Mur de garrigue,
Poulx, France, 2012
From the Lou Mistrau series
Website – ThomasBouquin.com

Thomas Bouquin was born in Lyon (France), and lives and works in Montréal (Québec), where he is currently completing a BA in photography at Concordia University. He is mainly interested by the relationship between man and the landscape, especially how elements such as memory, space and light can influence and modify our perception of these places. His work has been exhibited in the Art Matters Festival 2012, and in the VAV Gallery. Also, he is the co-author of a serie of zines called Montréal-Paris, exhibited in 2012 in DIY: Photographers & Books at the Cleveland Museum of Art, in ABC : MTL at the Canadian Center of Architecture, and are part of different public book collections such as La Chambre Blanche (Québec), and The Maison Européenne de la Photographie (Paris).

Karl Baden, Millbury, Massachusetts, August 6, 2010, 5:24 pm

Karl Baden, Millbury, Massachusetts, August 6, 2010, 5:24 pm

Karl Baden

Millbury, Massachusetts,
, August 6, 2010, 5:24 pm
From the Roadside Attractions series
Website – KBeveryday.blogspot.com

Karl Baden's childhood dream was to be an archaeologist. This dream was shattered upon taking his first college archaeology course. In the Fall of 1972, he took a leave from school, hitchhiked across the U.S., and traveled through Central and South America with his father's old Nikon. He has been taking and making photographs ever since. Though Baden has yet to launch his own website, a variety of his projects may be found at the gallery website of his faithful and tolerant dealer, Howard Yezerski and also at Luminous-lint.com and KBeveryday.blogspot.com.

Adam Neese, Christian and Friends, Old Heritage Road

Adam Neese, Christian and Friends, Old Heritage Road

Adam Neese

Christian and Friends, Old Heritage Road,
Grapevine, Texas, 2012
From the A Known World series
Website – AdamBNeese.com

Adam Neese was raised in the suburbs of Fort Worth, Texas. Along with photography, he also has experience as a migrant farmer, a land surveyor, and a photographer’s assistant. Adam’s projects examine his childhood history within the North Texas landscape, the intersection of geography and photography, and commodification of the land. He holds his BFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Currently, he is an MFA candidate at The University of North Texas, which he will receive in May of 2013.

David Soffa, Untitled

David Soffa, Untitled

David Soffa

Untitled,
Malvern, Pennsylvania, 2012
From the Centralia series
Website – DavidSoffa.com

David Soffa (b. 1987) was awarded a fellowship to Yale University Summer School of Art in 2009. He received a BA in Photography from Bard College in 2010. Primarily a landscape photographer, his images investigate the uncanny in everyday situations. Soffa’s photographs have been exhibited nationally in venues such as the Garrison Art Center and the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition. His work can also be found in the 2013 competition issue of The Photo Review and an upcoming installment of Dwell Magazine. He currently lives and works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren

Running 005824,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

NAKED JUDGING: The 2012 Canteen Awards in Photography

Due date for this contest is December 30th!!

Canteen Magazine publisher, Stephen Pierson, contacted me recently about a ground breaking idea for a photography contest, NAKED JUDGING: The 2012 Canteen Awards in Photography.  Canteen is a highly respected magazine and Stephen has given this idea a lot of thought–the idea is to have a completely transparent contest, where judging is live, so that participants can experience the behind the scenes drama of how things are selected. All submissions will have some kinds of critique, and there will be a clear presentation of how all submission monies are spent.  I will be partnering with Canteen to provide the on-line exposure for the winners. This indeed, is a contest unlike any other…

Naked Judging: The 2012
Canteen Awards in Photography
Canteen magazine is holding our second photography contest
because of our general disdain for photography contests. They tend to be opaque
affairs that stifle dialogue—the winners are chosen, no one quite knows why,
and 99% of the participants are left without their entrance fee or an
explanation. The real winners are the organizations1 
that run and profit exorbitantly from them.

We are trying to do
something different. Namely, treat our participants as partners. We aim to be
fully transparent about the entire selection process, placing the judges’
criteria, biases, and disagreements on full, naked display. The result, we
hope, will be an honest and provocative conversation about photography.

To these ends, Naked
Judging: The 2012 Canteen Awards in Photography offers several novel features:
      
A live finale: The final
round of judging, featuring the top 25 submissions, will occur in front of a
live audience, and will be simultaneously streamed online. Prior to the winners
being selected, audience members (both in-person and online) can probe the
judges with questions.

      Every submission openly
critiqued:
Similar to our first photo contest, brief notes/critiques
from all judging rounds will be available on our website for every submission.
      
Longer-form critiques:
The winning submission and other select submissions will be the subject of
longer-form discussions and essays in the next print issue of Canteen magazine,
and through this contest’s official partner, Lenscratch.
In addition, select participants will be given the opportunity to publicly
respond to the judges’ comments.

     
Nonprofit model: We are
not only providing a low entry fee ($20 for 5 to 8 images, and $15 for
students), but we will document on our website how every dollar is spent. At
the contest’s conclusion, any profits will be refunded back to the entrants.

We hope not only that our
contest will produce a provocative dialogue about photography, but also that it
will nudge other organizations into adopting practices that are friendlier to
the community of photographers that they purport to represent.

For
questions and feedback email Stephen Pierson, Canteen’s Director.



Philip Heying, 1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley

Philip Heying, 1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley

Philip Heying

1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley,
Lawrence, Kansas, 2012
From the Within a two mile radius for one year series
Website – PhilipHeying.com

Philip Heying is a photographer living in Lawrence, Kansas. In 1980, he met William S. Burroughs and began a friendship that endured until Burroughs’s death in 1997. Burroughs and his circle of friends, from Albert Hoffman and Allen Ginsberg, to Brion Gysin and Timothy Leary provided artistic insight and guidance. Soon after college, curiosity to experience another culture led Heying to France, via coal freighter. Since then his work has been exhibited and published internationally. Heying returned to the U.S. in 1997, settling in Brooklyn, New York, and became an assistant to Irving Penn until the Spring of 2001. In the fall of 2008, he returned from Brooklyn to Kansas to live closer to his family and pursue an idea for a photographic survey that began during a visit in the fall of 2005. He is currently employed as a professor of photography at Johnson County Community College and recently completed a body of photographs of the surprising variety of architecture, cultural and environmental processes to be found within walking distance from his home.
 

A Year of Photographers in the Picture

A little shy of a year agowith the world’s attention focused on a change of power in North Koreaa photo of Kim Jung Il’s funeral, released by KCNA (North Korean Central News Agency), sparked controversy. The image had been manipulatedless for overt political ends, more for visual harmony. Blog Submission . The photo’s offending elements, photoshopped from the image, were not political adversaries or top secret information, but a group of photographers who had disturbed the aesthetic order of the highly orchestrated and meticulously planned occasion.

KCNA/Reuters

Dec. 28, 2011. A limousine carrying a portrait of late North Korean leader Kim Jong-il leads his funeral procession in Pyongyang.

In an age where seemingly every occasion is documented through photography from every conceivable anglean estimated 380 billion photographs will be taken this year aloneit’s not only North Korean bureaucrats who are wrestling to keep hoards of other photographers out of their pictures.

Photographers frequently appear in news photographs made by others. Banks of cameras greet celebrities and public figures at every event; cell phones held high by admirers become a tribute in lights, but a distraction to the viewer. Amateurs and professionals, alike, appear in backgrounds and in foregrounds of images made at both orchestrated events and in more candid moments. squido lense . The once-invisible professional photographer’s process has been laid bare.

On occasion, photographers even purposefully make their fellow photographers the subject of their pictures. The most difficult picture to take, it seems, is one without the presence of another photographer either explicitly or implicitly in the frame.

Everyone wants to record their own version of realityironically, it turns out, because by distracting oneself with a camera, it’s easy to miss the true experience of a moment. At a recent Jack White concert, the guitarist requested that audience members stop trying to take their own photos. “The bigger idea,” his label noted in a statement, “is for people to experience the event with their own eyes and not watch an entire show through a tiny screen in their hand. We have every show photographed professionally and the pictures are available from Jack White’s website shortly after to download for free.”

The abundance of camera phones and inexpensive digital cameras has changed the photographic landscape in countless and still-incompletely understood ways, and it’s not just the North Korean government trying to find ways around the hoards of photographers making their way into everyone else’s shots. Here, TIME looks back on the past year to highlight an increasingly common phenomenon: the photographer in the picture.