Tag Archives: Photo Show

Photo Show – City of Home by Alina Kisina on show at Light House Media Centre in Wolverhampton

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City of Home, © Alina Kisina

Last year I posted on Ukrainian photographer Alina Kisina‘s show City of Home and am delighted to report that her latest work from the series is on show at the Light House Media Centre, Wolverhampton until 25 January 2013.  The exhibition includes new work specially commissioned by Light House.

And if you’re still thinking about Christmas presents, there is a special edition of three of her latest works available, including the two images posted here, for sale during the holiday season. Only 50 of each print will be produced and each will be numbered, signed by the photographer, and have a certificate of authenticity. Each unframed A4 print costs £75 + £7.50 p&p. A set of all three images can be bought for £200 + £12.50 p&p and includes an archival box and a set of gloves.

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City of Home, © Alina Kisina

Professor Raoul Eschelman, author of Performatism, or the End of Postmodernism, writes about the work:
“Alina Kisina’s photographs of urban spaces in her native Kiev are not documentary pictures in the usual sense of the word. Rather, Kisina’s work mixes abstraction and representation to create evocative images that elude easy description or categorization. The most striking aspect of her art is its bold use of reflections. These juxtapose different levels of reality in a way that confounds our notions of up and down, in and out, fore and back. But her aim is not simply to confuse us. Rather, the overlapping planes of reality draw us dynamically into her photos to produce a sensation of depth suggesting another, more profound dimension beyond the mere givens of the picture.
“In many of the photographs in the Light House exhibit, this is done in a way that is best described as dramatic. Powerfully etched lines, curves, and forms draw us into a receding space marked by extreme glare or by patches of bright light that seem to dissolve material reality within them. The photos of this kind take the form of dramatic epiphanies—intuitive, overpowering insights into the nature of reality experienced through commonplace forms and scenes.”

There is also a great interview with Light House about her work. Finally, Coventry-born photographer, teacher and supporter of Kisina’s work, John Blakemore, spoke to her in a filmed interview that will be available shortly.

Filed under: Photo Talks, Podcasts, Women Photographers Tagged: Alina Kisina, City of Home, John Blakemore, Light House Media Centre, photo show, Professor Raoul Eschelman, Wolverhampton

Brighton Photo Biennial 2012 – Trevor Paglen’s Geographies of Seeing show podcast with Lighthouse director Honor Harger

Lighthouse director Honor Harger. Photo © Wendy Pye

Social scientist, artist, writer and provocateur Trevor Paglen uses photography to explore the secret activities of the U.S. military and intelligence agencies. For me, Geographies of Seeing was one of Brighton Photo Biennial’s to-see shows, not least for Paglen’s multi-dimensional approach to his subject matter. Who could resist taking time to look at the work of someone who is described as a ‘provocateur’, especially as I first saw some of this work at Frieze art fair a few years ago and was intrigued back then.

On the press tour of the show I got a chance to discuss the work with Lighthouse director Honor Harger who provides an informed and articulate insight into Paglen’s work in the audio podcast below. Click on the link below and then again on the link, it goes green as you rool over it, in the next page. It is 17mins 26secs long.

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Trevor Paglen Geographies of Seeing Photo © Wendy Pye

“The Other Night Sky uses data from an international network of amateur satellite watchers to track and photograph classified spacecraft. Echoing the efforts of historic astronomers, Paglen documents astral movements that don’t officially exist.

Trevor Paglen Geographies of Seeing Photo © Wendy Pye

“In the series Limit Telephotography Paglen adapted the super-strength telescopes, normally used to shoot distant planets, to reveal top-secret U.S. governmental sites, sometimes 65 miles away from his camera; covert bases, so remote they cannot be seen by an unaided civilian eye from any point on Earth.

 Show photos above. Photo © Miranda Gavin

“Paglen coined the term “Experimental Geography” to describe practices coupling experimental cultural production and art-making with ideas from critical human geography about the production of space, materialism, and praxis. His work, such The Other Night Sky has received widespread attention for both his technical innovations and for his conceptual rigour. He is also author of three books including Torture Taxi (2006), the first book to comprehensively describe the CIA’s extraordinary rendition program, I Could Tell You But Then You Would Have to be Destroyed by Me (2007), which is a look at top-secret military programmes, and Blank Spots on the Map: The Dark Geography of the Pentagon’s Secret World, which is a broader look at secrecy in the United States.

Honor and I at the show. Photo © Wendy Pye

“Paglen (born in 1974) is an American artist, geographer, and author, currently based in New York. His work deliberately blurs lines between science, contemporary art, journalism, and technology to construct unfamiliar, yet meticulously researched ways to see and interpret the world around us. He has been exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; The Walker Arts Center, Minneapolis; The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Institute for Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams; the 2008 Taipei Biennial; the Istanbul Biennial 2009, and numerous other solo and group exhibitions.” From press release. Presented and curated in partnership with Lighthouse.

Filed under: Artist Talks, Photographers, Photography Festivals, Visual Artists Tagged: brighton, Brighton Photo Biennial 2012, experimental geography, Geographies of Seeing, Honor Harger, Lighthouse, photo show, space photography, Trevor Paglen

Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 – Mark Chilvers solo show The Elephant until 28 October

Another quick post to point you to a solo show of work by London-based photojournalist Mark Chilvers. Aptly titled The Elephant – referring to Elephant and Castle, not the wild animal – Chilvers’ project centres on the residents and the housing estate in south east London.

©Mark Chilvers, Boy with the Orange Net, from the series The Elephant.
Showing at The Phoenix Gallery, Brighton until 28 October.

Chilvers adds: “The Heygate estate was completed in 1974 but has been already condemned before reaching its 40th birthday. The residents have been ‘decanted’ and new dreams have been promised to the future communities of what is now called The Elephant or South Central.” There’s even a blog Live from The Heygate set up by a former resident, but it has not been updated since 2011.

Filed under: Photography Shows Tagged: Mark Chilvers, south London, The Elephant

Photo Stroll – Press preview Tom Wood Men & Women and Shoot! Existential Photography open at The Photographers’ Gallery London

Today, a whirlwind Photo Stroll tour through the press preview today of two photo shows, Tom Wood’s photo show Men & Women, and the shoot-themed collection of photos Shoot! Existential Photography. Both exhibitions open tomorrow at The Photographers’ Gallery in London and run until 6 January. So there’s plenty of time to take a stroll.

These shows combine a diverse range of visual genres and the tenderness of Wood’s beautifully articulated moments offsets the drama of the shoot imagery, such as Christian Marclay’s Crossfire and the various images of gun-toting women, including Fire at Will documenting Niki de Saint Phalle’s ‘shooting paintings’ created in the early 1960s. For those who fancy themselves as the fastest draw in the West (End), there’s even a shooting alley where, if you hit the bulls eye or the surrounding ring (see my attempt, last photo), the camera is triggered and Bingo, you get a photo of you shooting. For more on Men & Women, see earlier post on Tom Wood.
All iPhone photos © Miranda Gavin, 2012.

Click to view slideshow.

Click link to view the gallery images from the slide show…

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Filed under: Photo Stroll, Photographers, Photography Books, Photography Shows Tagged: Christian Marclay, Crossfire, Erik Kessels, Fire at Will, london, Men & Women, Niki de Saint Phalle, Shoot! Existential Photography, The Photographers’ Gallery, Tom Wood

Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 – Blind Field presents Origins of Encounter until 21 October

Blind Field are showing Origins of Encounter at the Phoenix Brighton until Sunday 21 October as part of the Brighton Fringe 2012. The artists involved are Joan Alexander, Luke AR Hamblin and Louise Maher, all of whom, according to the press release, “examine notions of the encounter in relation to place, narrative and the photograph”.

© Joan Alexander – Study V – Facing North Window – 60 Minutes

Joan Alexander
“Alexander’s work explores the margins of inscription and projection, the unacknowledged spectra between positive and negative. Alexander is interested in the ‘latent image’. A visual in waiting, from between times, like the line between shadow and light; the line, like a map, is always a metaphor. Alexander’s practice immerses the viewer within a passage of time through an encounter with the movement and interruption of light. Her projections create a space where the viewer must pass through lines of light drawing attention to their presence. The correlation between printed and projected material asks for a closer examination creating awareness to the tangible and intangible nature of her practice.”

© Luke AR Hamblin – A study of still life. Sunflowers

Luke AR Hamblin
“Hamblin is interested in the way in which photography enables us to dissect the world and pull it apart. For Hamblin making photographic pictures is about assembling a Cast of characters, analysing their poses, placing them in the picture frame. Hamblin has developed a complex process of picture-making, exploring the role of perception and portrayal in our engagement with ‘place’. His series Studies for a theory of the Epic Photograph encourages us to think about how simple aspects of pose and gesture can embody whole narrative worlds. Drawing on references from early twentieth century modes of portrayal: theatre, cinema and painting, Hamblin’s photographs offer the viewer undisclosed narratives to decipher and re-construct.”

© Louise Maher – Old Head, Kinsale 2006-2012

Louise Maher
“Maher’s practice concentrates upon the inextricable relationship we have to our environment. By focusing on everyday expressions of this connection, she explores perceptions of the encounter. Maher’s approach stems from an appreciation of the historical development of street photography, yet it is also influenced by a typological approach. She values the photograph’s capacity to simultaneously document and picture the world. Her photographic series’ unite aspects of spontaneity and formalization to create a visual language that presents the viewer with space to translate.” From the press release.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Festivals, Photography Shows Tagged: Blind Field, brighton, Brighton Photo Fringe, Joan Alexander, Louise Maher, Luke AR Hamblin, Origins of Encounter, photo show

Photo Show – Helen Sears Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments on show at Klompching Gallery New York

© Helen Sear, Sightlines, Untitled 4, 2011. Archival Pigment Print with Acrylic Gesso 7.25” x 7.25”, Edition of 3. From $2,000

© Helen Sear, Pastoral Monument 11, Fumaria Bastardi, 2012, Archival Pigment Print, 27.5” x 27.5”, Edition of 3 + 2 AP’s (AP1 nfs). From $3,000.

 SIGHTLINES AND PASTORAL MOMENTS
The third solo exhibition of new artworks by the British photographer Helen Sear is on until 26 October at the Klompching Gallery in New York. Two new series will be presented as the gallery’s opening exhibition for the 2012–2013 season, accompanied by the US launch of the monograph charting a more than 25-year practice.

“Sightlines and Pastoral Monuments continue Sear’s commitment to conceptual applications, integration of photographic process, historical reference and visual allure. Sightlines is an exquisite set of 21 photographs, partially concerned with ideas about the unique object and the copy. The images themselves depict a portrait of a woman whose face is obscured by a mass-produced, but hand-painted figurine of a bird. Sear alters the final photograph through the application of several layers of white primer—gesso.

“The images, then, are also about photographing paint and painting photographs. This convergence of the unique and/or the copy is further implicated by notions of her concern with identity.obscuring the face of the woman, Sear interrupts the gaze of both sitter and observer. The spectator of the photograph is unable to know the sitter’s identity, in a similar way that she/he can’t know the identity of the person(s) who hand-painted the bird. These small-scale photographs confound our expectations in the most delightful way, and are a testimony to the conceptual and visual strength of Sear’s practice.

“Showing alongside Sightlines, is Pastoral Monuments, which expands an underlying theme of the real and the re-presentation of it. In this case, Sear references the historical photographs of the botanist and photographer, Mary Dillwyn, whose photographs from the early 1850’s depicted wild flowers arranged in domestic crockery. Sear has sourced more than 80 wild flowers from the same Welsh field and photographed them in jugs and vases from around the world.

“Through handling the resulting prints and rephotographing them—evidencing this handling—Sear believes that “the flowers and their containers become connected in a material sense, across the surface of the image.” Further, we see in the photographs familiar ideas associated with flowers—youth, beauty and mortality. In some ways, these photographs become monuments to flowers.” Press release.

Filed under: Art shows, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Helen Sears, New York, Pastoral Monuments, Sightlines

Photo News – The Photographers’ Gallery announces FreshFaced and WildEyed finalists and The World in London project

Technology is getting the better of me. Just when I thought I’d got everything under control, the trackpad on my computer decided to take a sabbatical and refused to function. Time for another service…

News from The Photographers’ Gallery about the FreshFaced and WildEyed finalists and a reminder to catch its major Olympic project The World in London. You can catch the exhibition, see images above, in Oxford Street until 30 August and/or follow this link to some of the installation shots.

The World in London website has short podcasts and written testimonials from the sitters or photographers as well as links to each of the photographers’ websites/online presence, including Melanie Stidolph who took the portrait of Mauritius-born Corina Armel.

The Photographers’ Gallery presents FreshFaced+WildEyed 2012, its annual exhibition targeted at recent graduates from BA and MA visual arts courses across the UK where photography has formed the main component of their practice. The work will be on show at The Photographers Gallery from 15-30 September.

It’s interesting that the competition is for both undergraduates and postgraduates as, in my experience, there is often quite a difference in the types of work produced. How many are postgraduates and how many are undergraduates? On a quick scan, there are five BA students and the rest are post grads.

I recognise the names of post-grad photographers Emma Critchley and David Birkin (he showed work at Hotshoe Gallery way back) as well as Chloe Sells who I selected as the winner of the Hotshoe Photofusion Award last year. Twenty-two photographers were chosen from an open submission of hundreds of applicants for a competition that “aims to draw attention to innovative new talents from a range of photographic fields”.

I’m pleased to see that more institutions and competitions are offering prizes with a longer shelf life such as year-long mentoring schemes – not just short-term cash or equipment fixes. This year there will also be an online image gallery.

The selected finalists are:
Hallgerður Hallgrímsdóttir incorporates found images into her interpretation of home, her country of origin – Iceland.
David Birkin combines original and appropriated images to examine the production and dissemination of war photography.
Helen Goodin and Chloe Sells apply darkroom processes to images exploring the nature of light and the creation of abstract landscapes.
Alison Bettles and SeoYeoung Won use constructed photographs and studio installations to investigate photography’s relationship with sculpture and painting.
Jonny Briggs’ staged scenes seek to recapture forgotten childhood memories and Elisavet Tamouridou attempts to retrace her family’s lost history following the 1922 Greek genocide and displacement.
Maria Gruzdeva will showcase her documentary study of the Russian Border Guard Service community while Emma Critchley’s series of underwater images address more conceptual ideas about the fragility of life.
Additional featured artists include: Brendan Baker & Daniel Evans, Anders Birger, Paula Gortázar, Gemma Marmalade, Marianne McGurk, Nadège Mériau, Vilma Pimenoff, Minna Pöllänen, Martin Seeds, Alison Stolwood and Helen Thompson.

To read more about the judges and for a full list of finalists (with their website details where possible) see over…

They were chosen by a judging panel of photography experts: Bridget Coaker, night picture editor for The Guardian and Observer and co-founder of Troika Editions; Anthony Luvera, artist; Karen Newman, Curator, Open Eye and Brett Rogers, Director, The Photographers’ Gallery.

FreshFaced+WildEyed is dedicated to recognising and nurturing new talents and “has helped launch and establish the careers of several photographers such as James Cant, Briony Campbell, Petros Chrisostomou and Steve Schofield – all of whom have gone on to publish their work and exhibit in local and international venues. More recently a number of past participants have been commissioned by The Photographers’ Gallery to take part in its major Olympic project The World in London”.

New talents? Mmmmm – what does new mean in this context? I’m sure that being selected as a finalist for this show is helpful for a photographer’s career but it is also a numbers game as in five years over 100 finalists have been selected. It would be good to see what they are all doing now and to see how much this exposure helped in a more concrete way as there are so many claims made with little investigation into exactly how the photographers have been helped.
David Birkin (b.1977, UK) Slade School of Fine Art MA Fine Art Media www.davidbirkin.co.uk
Jonny Briggs (b.1985, UK) Royal College of Art MA Photography www.jonnybriggs.com
Emma Critchley (b.1980, UK) Royal College of Art MA Photography www.emmacritchley.com
Brendan Baker (b.1988, UK) & Daniel Evans (b. 1990, UK) University for of the Creative Arts, FarnhamBA (Hons) Photography www.daniel-evans.info
Helen Goodin (b. 1987, UK) University for the Creative Arts, Farnham MFA Photography www.helengoodinphotography.co.uk
Paula Gortázar (b.1984, Spain) University of Westminster Photographic Studies MA www.paulagortazar.com
Maria Gruzdeva (b.1989, Russia) London College of Communication MA Photography
Hallgerður Hallgrímsdóttir (b. 1984, Iceland) Glasgow School of Art BA (Hons) Fine Art Photography www.hallgerdur.com
Gemma Marmalade (b. 1979, UK) London College of Fashion MA Photography www.gemmamarmalade.com
Marianne McGurk (b. 1977, UK) Blackpool & the Fylde CollegeBA Photography www.mariannemcgurk.com
Nadège Mériau (b.1968, Tunisia) Royal College of Art MA Photography www.nadegemeriau.com
Vilma Pimenoff (b. 1980, Finland) London College of Communication MA Photography www.vilmapimenoff.com
Minna Pöllänen (b. 1980, Finland) London College of Communication MA photography www.minnapollanen.com
Martin Seeds (b. 1964, Northern Ireland) University of Brighton BA Photography www.martinseeds.com
Chloe Sells (b.1976, USA) Central Saint Martins MA Fine Art www.chloesells.com
Alison Stolwood (b. 1983, UK) University of Brighton MA Photography www.alisonstolwood.com
Elisavet Tamouridou (b.1980, Greece) London College of Communication MA Photography www.elizatamo.com
Helen Thompson (b. 1987, UK) University of Gloucestershire BA Photography; Editorial and Advertising www.helengraceventurathompson.com
SeoYeoung Won (b. 1981, South Korea) Slade School of Fine Art MA Fine Art Mediawww.seoyeoung.com

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photography Awards & Competitions, Photography Shows Tagged: Chloe Sells, David Birkin, Emma Critchley, FreshFaced and WildEyed, london, Melanie Stidolph, Oxford Street, photo competition, photo show, The Photographers’ Gallery, The World in London

Photo Stroll – My Positive Day photos by Jiří Třeštík in Prague

The Roaming Eye (tRE) is back in the Czech Republic and is on the look out for, and is enjoying coming across, some random photography. With this in mind, the q cafe has a small show downstairs in the cafe on Opatovická 12, Praha 1 until 28 July.
Czech photographer Jiří Třeštík accompanied and documented three men living with HIV in three different European cities Prague, Munich and Zurich.
So here’s a preview for those who may be interested in the small cafe/bar show…

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Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photography Shows, Uncategorized Tagged: AIDS, black and white, documentary, HIV, Jiří Třeštík, photo show, Prague