Tag Archives: Photo Of The Year

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | September 2012

Deadlines

Lens Culture International Exposure Awards : September 18

Format Festival 2013 : September 19

Portrait Salon : September 21

Magnum Showcase in association with IdeasTap : September 24

Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award : September 30

Marie Colvin Scholarship opportunity at Sunday Times Magazine… NB for writers

Marie Colvin. Photo © Ivor Prickett

Marie Colvin Scholarship : September 30

BJP’s 2012 International Photography Award : October 1

Photo © Alice Smeets
Unicef Photo of The Year 2008

Unicef Photo of the Year : NB photographers have to be nominated but you can get in touch with nominators in the hope of your work being put forward to the judging panel. Some of the nominators are Sherri Dougherty, and photographers Patrick Brown and James Whitlow Delano. You can send a sample of a maximum of 15 light jpeg files (72 dpi; 1200 pixels on the longest side) for consideration in a zip file via We Transfer, to one of the three. Emails: [email protected][email protected] ;[email protected]   : October 3

College Photographer of the Year : October 7

International Prize of Humanitarian Photography Luis Valtueña : October 31

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2012 : October 31

PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Awards : November 1

Pikto Top Pick Photo Contest : November 1

Aftermath Project grant : November 5

Prix Lucas Dolega to honor photojournalists who have reported under difficult circumstanstances in memory of photographer Lucas Dolega (1978-2011) who died in 2011 covering the Arab Spring in Tunisia.

Prix Lucas Dolega : November 15

Terry O’Neill/Tag Award 2012 : November 22

The Magnum Expression Award : February 23, 2013

The Inquisitive Photography Prize

Recipients

Stephanie Sinclair was presented with unprecedented third Visa d’Or Prize at Visa pour l’image in the beginning of September for her Child Brides project. The series was partly shot for the National Geographic… You can see the NGM feature from the June 2011 issue here.

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair wins third Visa d’Or prize (BJP) | Stephanie Sinclair Honored Again at Perpignan Festival (NYT Lens)

The above links also include info on the other Visa pour l’image winners: Visa d’Or news award to Eric Bouvet for his coverage from Bab al-Azizia, Libya, for Le Figaro Magazine; Visa d’Or daily press award to Tomas Munita for his photographs of the conflict in Syria for The New York Times; City of Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award to Sebastian Liste for his photographs of a community of squatters living in an abandoned chocolate factory in the center of Salvador de Bahia, Brazil; Prix Ani to Misha Friedman for his report on tuberculosis in the former Soviet Union ; Pierre & Alexandra Boulat Grant to Maciek Nabrdalik for his for report on economic migration in Europe; and Canon Female Photojournalist Award to Sarah Caron. Congratulations to all.

Getty Image handed out four $20,000 grants during Visa pour l’image…

Photo © Bharat Choudhary

Getty Awards $80,000 to Four Photojournalists at Perpignan (Lightbox) | Getty Images awards $80,000 worth of grants to four photojournalists (BJP)

Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant Winner: Tim Matsui

Joel Meyerowitz, David LaChapelle Among This Year’s Lucie Award Honorees (Mediabistro)

The New York Photo Awards 2012 Finalists

International Photography Awards 2012 Winners

Guardian gallery to Taylor Wessing shortlisted four and couple of the other exhibited portraits…

Photo © Jordi Ruiz Cirera

Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize 2012 shortlisted (Guardian)

Firecracker Grant recipient

The Royal Photographic Society Annual Awards | more info (pdf)

Malcolm Browne: The Story Behind The Burning Monk

Photographer Malcolm Browne, known for his shocking and iconic image of a self-immolating monk in Saigon, died on Monday at the age of 81. Browne was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting as well as the World Press Photo of the Year in 1963.Last year, Browne spoke with TIME international picture editor Patrick Witty from his home in Vermont.

Patrick Witty: What was happening in Vietnam leading up to the day you took your famous photograph of Quang Duc’s self-immolation?

Malcolm Browne: I had been in Vietnam at that point for a couple of years when things began to look ugly in central Vietnam. I took a much greater interest in the Buddhists of Vietnam than I had before, because it seemed to me they were likely to be movers and shakers in whatever turned up next. I came to be on friendly terms with quite a lot of the monks who were leaders of this movement that was taking shape.

AP

AP correspondent Malcolm Browne in 1965

Along about springtime (1963), the monks began to hint that they were going to pull off something spectacular by way of protestand that would most likely be a disembowelment of one of the monks or an immolation. And either way, it was something we had to pay attention to.

At that point the monks were telephoning the foreign correspondents in Saigon to warn them that something big was going to happen. Most of the correspondents were kind of bored with that threat after a while and tended to ignore it. I felt that they were certainly going to do something, that they were not just bluffing, so it came to be that I was really the only Western correspondent that covered the fatal day.

PW: Tell me about that morning. You certainly weren’t expecting something so dramatic but you felt drawn because of a call the night before?

MB: I had some hint that it would be something spectacular, because I knew these monks were not bluffing. They were perfectly serious about doing something pretty violent. In another civilization it might have taken the form of a bomb or something like that.

The monks were very much aware of the result that an immolation was likely to have. So by the time I got to the pagoda where all of this was being organized, it was already underwaythe monks and nuns were chanting a type of chant that’s very common at funerals and so forth. At a signal from the leader, they all started out into the street and headed toward the central part of Saigon on foot. When we reached there, the monks quickly formed a circle around a precise intersection of two main streets in Saigon. A car drove up. Two young monks got out of it. An older monk, leaning a little bit on one of the younger ones, also got out. He headed right for the center of the intersection. The two young monks brought up a plastic jerry can, which proved to be gasoline. As soon as he seated himself, they poured the liquid all over him. He got out a matchbook, lighted it, and dropped it in his lap and was immediately engulfed in flames. linkwheel creation . Everybody that witnessed this was horrified. It was every bit as bad as I could have expected.

I don’t know exactly when he died because you couldn’t tell from his features or voice or anything. He never yelled out in pain. His face seemed to remain fairly calm until it was so blackened by the flames that you couldn’t make it out anymore. Finally the monks decided he was dead and they brought up a coffin, an improvised wooden coffin.

PW: And you were the only photographer there?

MB: As far as I could tell, yes. It turns out that there were some Vietnamese that took some pictures but they didn’t go outthey’re not on the wires or anything like that.

PW: What were you thinking while you were looking through the camera?

MB: I was thinking only about the fact it was a self-illuminated subject that required an exposure of about, oh say, f10 or whatever it was, I don’t really remember. I was using a cheap Japanese camera, by the name of Petri. I was very familiar with it, but I wanted to make sure that I not only got the settings right on the camera each time and focused it properly, but that also I was reloading fast enough to keep up with action.I took about ten rolls of film because I was shooting constantly.

PW: How did you feel?

MB: The main thing on my mind was getting the pictures out. I realized this is something of unusual importance and that I’d have to get them to the AP in one of its far flung octopus tentacles as soon as possible. And I also knew this was a very difficult thing to do in Saigon on short notice.

PW: What did you do with the film?

MB: The whole trick was to get it to some transmission point. We had to get the raw film shipped by air freight, or some way. It was not subject to censorship at that point. We used a pigeon to get it as far as Manila. And in Manila they had the apparatus to send it by radio.

PW: When you say pigeon, what do you mean exactly?

MB: A pigeon is a passenger on a regular commercial flight whom you have persuaded to carry a little package for him. Speed was of the essence obviously. So we had to get it to the airport. It got aboard a flight leaving very soon for Manila.

PW: Did anyone from the AP, once the film arrived, send a message to you saying that the picture was being published all over the world?

MB: No.

PW: You didn’t know?

MB: No, we didn’t know, it was like shooting into a black hole. We learned that it had arrived only after messages began to come through congratulating us for sending such a picture. It was not run by everybody. The New York Times did not run it. They felt it was too grisly a picture that wasn’t suitable for a breakfast newspaper.

PW: I’m looking at the picture now on my screen. Tell me what I’m not seeing what are you hearing, smelling?

MB: The overwhelming smell of joss sticks. They do make a very strong smell, not a particularly nice smell, but it’s meant to appease the ancestors and all of that. That was the overwhelming smell except for the smell of burning gasoline and diesel and the smell of burning flesh, I must say. The main sound was the wailing and misery of the monks, who had known this guy for many years before and were feeling for him. Then there was shouting over loudspeakers between the fire department people, trying to figure out a way to put him out, put out the flames around him without actually killing him or something. So it was a jumble of confusion.

PW: I read once what President Kennedy said about your photograph. He said, “No news picture in history has generated so much emotion around the world as that one.”

MB: Yeah, that could be, that sounds like an honest quote from the White House.

PW: Would you consider the photograph your crown achievement in journalism?

MB:It attracted a lot of attention, I’ll say that for it. It was not necessarily the hardest story I’ve ever had to cover, but it was certainly an important part of my career.

World Press Photo Winners: high-resolution slideshow

01_Samuel Aranda.jpg

World Press Photo of the Year 2011:
Samuel Aranda, Spain, for The New York Times. Sanaa, Yemen, 15 October.
A woman holds a wounded relative during protests against president Saleh.

This World Press Photo of the Year shows a woman holding a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011. The winning photographer, Samuel Aranda, was working in Yemen on assignment for The New York Times.

Koyo Kouoh, a member of the jury said this about the winning photo:

“It is a photo that speaks for the entire region. It stands for Yemen, Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Syria, for all that happened in the Arab Spring. But it shows a private, intimate side of what went on. article writing submission . And it shows the role that women played, not only as care-givers, but as active people in the movement.”

Nina Berman, another member of the jury said:

“In the Western media, we seldom see veiled women in this way, at such an intimate moment. It is as if all of the events of the Arab Spring resulted in this single moment — in moments like this.”

You can see the other winning images, and read more about the winners and the competition in Lens Culture, including a high-resolution slideshow.

World Press Photo Awards Announced

Today the winners of the prestigious 55th annual World Press Photo competition were announced in Amsterdam, and Samuel Aranda from Spain received the prize for World Press Photo of the Year 2011.

The winning photograph shows a woman caring for a wounded relative, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on October 15, 2011. Samuel Aranda was working in Yemen on assignment for The New York Times. He is represented by Corbis Images.

TIME photographer Yuri Kozyrev of Noor won first prize in the Spot News Singles category with his explosive picture of rebels leaping off a tank in Ras Lanuf, Libya.

A gallery of selected winners is above. You can see all the results here.

TIME salutes all of this year’s winners. Congratulations!

To see a multimedia about Jodi Bieber’s World Press Photo of the Year for TIME in 2011 click here.

Wednesday 16 February 2011

Let’s start with some World Press Photo winners’ interviews…

Interviews Daniel Morel (BJP: February 2011)

Interviews Jodi Bieber (Mediaclubsouthafrica: February 2011)

InterviewsAndrew McConnell (Msnbc: February 2011) Photoblog exclusive: Interview with World Press Photo winner Andrew McConnell

InterviewsMichael Wolf (BJP: February 2011) World Press Photo: Is Google Street View photojournalism?

Photographers Michael Wolf

I took another look at the winners gallery on the Word Press Photo site, and I couldn’t feel a bit baffled that the 1st prize sports story went to photographer Adam Pretty for ‘sports portfolio’… his photos were great, but how portfolio can be seen as a story, I don’t understand…I preferred the 2nd prize winner Tomasz Gudzowaty’s Mexico Car Frenzy piece in the sense that it was a clear story and very, very strong… Had to check out his personal site…

Photo: Tomasz Gudzowaty

PhotographersTomasz Gudzowaty

Wasn’t familiar with his work before…Neither did I know of these photographer…no that they were the only ones…

Daily Life 2nd prize singles winner…

PhotographersMalte Jaeger

Daili life 2nd prize stories winner…

PhotographersFernando Moleres

It was nice to see some smiles in the World Press Photo winners gallery too..Such a great and simple idea by Amit Madheshiya…

The above is from Arts and Entertainment: 1st prize stories

Interesting fact, if true, in Scott Strazzante tweet yesterday…”All you need to know about subjectivity of contests- World Press Photo of the Year voted out in 1st round of POYi portrait judging”

Articles – BagNewsNotes: What’s Wrong with the World Press Choice of “Photo of the Year”? (BNN: February 2011)

Articles – DuckRabbit: World Press or Propaganda? (Duckrabbit: Februrary 2011)

Articles – Joerg Colberg: It is that time of the year again(Conscientious: February 2011)

Photos: Jodi Bieber (left); Steve McCurry (right)

Articles – David Campbell: Thinking Images v.10: Jodi Bieber’s Afghan girl portrait in context (David Campbell blog: February 2011)

Articles – Jeremy Nicholl: An Unfortunate Event At World Press Photo (Jeremy Nicholl blog: February 2011)

Articles – Greg Ruffing: On Technology and Photography: Damon Winter in POY, Michael Wolf in World Press (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

POYi…

Articles – PDN: Damon Winter Wins Newspaper Photographer of the Year at POYi (PDN: February 2011)

Bill Allard on photo contests…

Articles – William Albert Allard: Awards (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

PhotographersWilliam Albert Allard

Back to Cairo….

Photo: Alex Majoli

Features and Essays – Alex Majoli: The Agony and Ecstacy (Newsweek: February 2011) Egypt

Photo: Peter Turnley/Corbis

Features and Essays – Peter Turnley: Turning Point of Revolution in Egypt (Photographer’s website: February 2011) Same series on The Online Photographer with interesting notes by Turnley himself.

Photo: David Degner

Features and Essays – WSJ (David Degner and Guy Martin): Celebrations Follow Resignation in Egypt (WSJ: February 2011)

More photos added since Saturday to the Cairo gallery by Dominic Nahr on the TIME website…

Features and Essays – Dominic Nahr: Uprising in Cairo (TIME: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Etienne De Malglaive: Fort Liberty in Tahrir Square (Photographer’s archive: February 2011)

Articles – BJP: Dispatches from Tahrir Square – Photographers recount their experiences in Cairo and look at the future (BJP: February 2011)

Photo: Francesco Alesi

Features and Essays – Francesco Alesi: The Limbo Nation (Parallelo Zero: 2011) Nagorno Karabakh, South Caucasus

Features and Essays – Ed Kashi: The Leaves Keep Falling (VII Magazine: February 2011) Legacy of Agent Orang

Features and Essays – Richard Nicholson: London’s Last Darkrooms (Telegraph: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Evan Joseph: New York City At Night (Telegraph: February 2011)

Features and Essays – David Trilling: Turkmenistan: While Officials Frolic, Caspian Gas Mecca Rusts and Groans (Eurasianet.org: 2011)

Features and Essays – Sebastien van Malleghem: Police (burn: February 2011)

Poulomi Basu’s To Conquer Her Land now in Guernica….

Features and Essays – Poulomi Basu: To Conquer Her Land (Guernica: February 2011)

Daniel Cuthbert’s Bushmen on BBC…

Features and Essays – Daniel Cuthbert: South Africa’s Bushmen under threat (BBC: February 2011)

Eugene Richards interview Gerry Badger did with him in 2009…related to his War is Personal work and book

InterviewsEugene Richards (BJP: 2009)

Speaking of books…Congratulations again to Ben Lowy …

Photo: Ben Lowy

Articles – BJP: Benjamin Lowy wins First Photography Book Prize (BJP: February 2011)

Articles – CDS Awards: William Eggleston Selects Benjamin Lowy to Win First Book Prize in Photography (CDS: February 2011)

More books…

BooksDewiLewis : new 2011 catalogue is now available to download.

Interviews Larry Clark (Guardian: February 2011)

InterviewsPhilip Lorca di Corcia (NYT: February 2011)

Interviews Jon Levy (Vimeo)

Intervews Misha Erwitt (Leica blog: 2011)

Saw Andrew Burton tweet this: “If you work, contribute or are interested in any form of media, entertainment or journalism, READ THIS:”

Articles – NYT: David Carr: At Media Companies, a Nation of Serfs (NYT: February 2011)

Articles – NYT: War Photographer Remembered at Paris Show (NYT: 2011)

Articles – A Photo Editor: Recent Facebook Changes Are Bad For Professional Photographers (APE: February 2011)

Articles – Verve Photo: Rachel Mummey (Verve: February 2011)

My friend Conor O’Leary, is probably even a bigger PJ hound than me… tweeted this the other day…

“New website and new work from Mikhael Subotzky”…better check it out then…

The above is from Subotzky’s couple of years old Beaufort West series

PhotographersMikhael Subotzky … the new work

Photographers Will Berridge

AgenciesVII Network February 2011 newsletter

InterviewsEdward Linsmier (Tampabay.com: February 2011) St. Petersburg Times photo intern Edward Linsmier

Resources Shakodo

TutorialsHow to shoot video for News and documentary (iTunes)

Resources The Pocket Locator | more info

Videos / InterviewsPhotographer Alec Soth on a Life of Approaching Strangers (Youtube)

Grants Michael P. Smith Fund For Documentary Photography

To finish off, a joke… “So this SEO expert walks into a bar, grill, pub, public house, Irish bar, bartender, drinks, beer, wine, liquor…” via @pud

World Press Photo Winners 2011 — high-resolution slideshow

Last week, the World Press Photo jury announced their choices for the best press photos published in 2010. Lens Culture is pleased to present a selection of the winners again this year. A record number of 108,059 images was submitted to the contest, and the number of participating photographers was 5,847, representing 125 different nationalities.

worldpress2011-blog.jpg

A sampling of some of the winning images in this year’s World Press Photo Competition.
All photos individual photographers, courtesy of World Press Photo.

At first glance, almost all of the winning images portray doom and gloom and lots of it. The year 2010, as depicted by the award winners, was filled with tragedy, horror, natural disaster, inhumanity, outrage and despair. divorce lawyers . The overall winner is an unforgettable image (below) by Jodi Beiber, of a young Afghan woman mutilated on the orders of the Taliban.

worldpress2011_1.jpg

World Press Photo of the Year 2010: Jodi Bieber, South Africa, Institute for Artist Management/Goodman Gallery for “Time” magazine

These difficult and disturbing images are softened (slightly) by some dream-like photos of wild animals in nature, split-second moments of seemingly impossible physical feats in the Sports category, and an ironic look at daily life captured through the random lens of Google Street View and edited with a curator’s critical eye by photographer Michael Wolf.

michael-wolf-google.jpg

Photographer Michael Wolf, who has won several World Press Photo awards in previous years, received an honorable mention in the Contemporary Issues category, for his selection of images from Google Street View.

See this article at Lens Culture for more information and a high-resolution slideshow of the winning images.

Saturday 12 February 2011

I was supposed to begin with World Press Photo links, but after last night’s events in Cairo, I think it’s only right to start with Egypt…

Photo: Marco Longari

Features and Essays – NYT Lens: Pictures of the Day: Egypt and Elsewhere (NYT: February 2011)

The New York Times Egypt gallery again….

Features and Essays – NYT: Protests in Egypt (NYT: February 2011)

Photo: Alan Chin

Features and Essays – Alan Chin: Mubarak No More (BNN: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Ed Ou: Young Egyptian’s Spread Their Message (NYT: February 2011) video Cairo’s Facebook Flat

Features and Essays – Magnum: Egypt by Magnum photographers (Magnum: February 2011)

From Los Angeles Times…

Features and Essays – Michael Robinson Chavez: Firsthand account of Cairo clashes (LAT: February 2011) Times photographer Michael Robinson Chavez recounts his experiences covering the bloody clashes as thousands of supporters of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak attacked anti-government protesters in Cairo’s Tahrir Square on Wednesday.

Photo: Moises Saman

InterviewsEd Ou and Moises Saman : Photographing the Celebration in Cairo (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Great piece by Stephen Farrell on the Lens blog the other day…still relevant as an insight into how difficult it was for a lot of photojournalists to work in Cairo…

Interviews Stephen Farrell : What Not to Bring to Tahrir Square (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Interviews Ron Haviv : Reading faces in Tahrir square (MSNBC: February 2011)

Now to World Press Photo…Congratulation to Jodi Bieber for winning the top prize this year!

Awards World Press Photo 2011 Winners Gallery

Photo: Jodi Bieber

Articles – CPN: Jodi Bieber wins World Press Photo of the Year 2010 (CPN: February 2011)

InterviewsJodi Bieber (World Press Photo: February 2011) A phone call to Jodi Bieber
World Press Photo managing director called South African photographer Jodi Bieber to tell her the news that her photo was selected as the World Press Photo of the Year 2010.)

Great World Press Photo coverage by BJP’s @OliviercLaurent yesterday….

Articles – BJP: Jodie Bieber wins World Press Photo (BJP: February 2011)

Articles – BJP: Independent photographers win big at World Press Photo (BJP: February 2011)

Photo: Olivier Laban-Mattei

Articles – BJP : World Press Photo judges about the shocking images in this year’s result (BJP: February 2011)

Articles NYT Lens: Is This the Best News Picture in the World? (NYT Lens: February 2011

Damon Winter/3rd place POYi/Hipstamatic debate…

Articles – Poynter: Chat replay: What role do image apps like Hipstamatic have in photojournalism? (Poynter: February 2011)

Photo: Damon Winter

Interviews – Damon Winter: Through My Eye, Not Hipstamatic’s (NYT Lens: February 2011)

Interviews – Damon Winter : Winter explains process, philosophy behind award-winning Hipstamatic photos (Poynter: February 2011)

Articles – Chip Litherland: There’s an App for Photojournalism (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

Articles – DVA Foto: Some thoughts on iPhone pictures and POYi (Dva Foto: February 2011)

About POYi in general…

Articles – NYT: And the Winnner Is…. Anonymous (NYT Lens: February 2011)

And don’t forget to read the latest from Shit Photojournalists Like…

Blogs – SFL: Photography Contests (SFL: February 2011)

And to other things…

Photo: Steve McCurry

Features and Essays – Steve McCurry: The Last Roll of Kodachrome (Vanity Fair: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Christopher Anderson: A Little Goes a Long Way (Magnum in Motion: February 2011) Hunger in America

Features and Essays – Peter DiCampo: Life Without Lights (Project website) Project blog

Features and Essays – Christian Lutz: Tropical Gift (MSNBC: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Kevin Frayer/AP: A Bird’s-eye View of Afghanistan (TIME: February 2011) Helmand province as seen from the air

Features and Essays – Brent Stirton: Gold’s Costly Dividend (Human Rights Watch: 2011)

Features and Essays – Katie Orlinsky: Persevering in Ciudad Juárez (NYT: February 2011)

Features and Essays – Brian Cassey: Cyclone Yasi – CAT 5 (Fotostrada: February 2010) Queensland, Australia

Sad news from Afghanistan…

News – PDN: Photojournalist Giles Duley Gravely Injured in Afghanistan (PDN)

Always worth checking out the Month in Photography…Guardian’s multimedia guide to best exhibitions and books….

Photo: Balazs Gardi

Exhibitions and Books – Guardian: The Month in Photography

Articles – Telegraph: Sony World Photography Awards 2011 – professional finalists and shortlisted images (Telegraph: February 2011) Same in New Yorker

Fundraising The Middle East Journals of Tom Hurndall (Indiegogo)

BlogsThe Atlantic : In Focus

Articles – Guardian: Featured photojournalist: Carlos Barria (Guardian: February 2011)

InterviewsPeter Turnley interview on Ceausescu, Honecker,Tiananmen, Mubarak (CNN: February 2011)

Interviews Yumi Goto (e-photoreview: February 2011)

Interviews Mike Berube (e-photoreview: January 2011)

Interviews Jonathan Taggart (NYT Lens: February 2011)

CompetitionsChanges-Art

Competitions Foam Magazine is accepting submissions from under 35yo photogs for their Talent Issue.

Grants Judges named for Getty Images Grants for Good. Photographers may apply by March 1.

FestivalsThe New York Photo Festival now open for submissions Deadline FEB 25 2011 Theme: Provocation

Festivals – Noorderlicht : Voices of the Middle East : Call for submissions

Workshops/Events Rhubarb-Rhubarb : See expecially their seminars page here : Next two seminars: Title: Photography Still Moving Date: 19th March 2011 Time:10.30am – 4.30 pm Venue: The Box, QUAD Market Place Cathedral Quarter Derby DE1 3AS UK AND Title: The Crossing : WM Date: 26th March 2011 Time: 11am – 6pm Venue: The Theatre , The Custard Factory, Gibb Street, Digbeth, Birmingham . B9 4AA

Equipment Thuraya

Equipment BGAN

Articles – Todd Bigelow: 10 things photo assistant should pay attention to (Todd Bigelow blog: February 2011)

Articles – Wada Laube: Some lessons from Leibovitz (Wada Laube blog: February 2011) Found via @LucasJacksonRTR

Articles – Casey Templeton: Bringing Your Vision to Your Clients Brand (Photographer’s blog: February 2011)

I’m ashamed to state this… but I can’t help but recognise myself in the people in Tim Fadek’s photo below…. I might be out with Veronica and our friends having a great time or something and I still can’t stop fiddling my iPhone…

Photo: Tim Fadek

Articles/Features and Essays – Tim Fadek: Is Social Media Destroying Public Interaction? (BNN: February 2011)

Photographers Victoria Will

PhotographersBen Cannon

Photographers Spencer Murphy

PhotographersCharles Ludeke

Agencies The Church of London

I saw @timfadek tweet this… “Viber is great, free phone calls to other members on iPhone. Like skype but more reliable” http://www.viber.com/ Have to check it out, definitely….

@valerioberdini tweeted this….pretty funny… How To Be Cool at a Gallery Opening

Gotta love Bill Cunningham…Probably first time I’ve seen Anna Wintour without sunglasses…She looks pretty… the sunglasses always gave me a mean vibe of her…

Trailer Bill Cunningham New York

News – Alec Soth diversifies into print & scan photography services.

Nearly 2,5K views yesterday…all time record…and I didn’t even do updates…I think it was all those people googling “Jodi Bieber” that brought most of the traffic..

To finish off, a joke: “A man goes to doctor..”I’m addicted to Twitter”, he says…Doctor says: “I’m sorry, I don’t follow you” via @JemimaGoldsmith

– World Press Photo photojournalism contest

The prestigious World Press Photo photojournalism contest, now in its 52nd year, is now underway. Professional press photographers are invited to submit photographs (individual or photo stories) in ten different categories. The 2009 jury panel is headed by MaryAnne Golon, consulting editor for Time magazine.

Judges will base their decisions on the photographs’ journalistic significance and photographer’s technique and vision. The Photo of the Year Award recipient will win EUR 10,000. Entries via mail are being accepted Oct 1, 2008 – January 15, 2009 while online submissions are accepted between December 1, 2008 and January 15, 2009. Winners to be announced in February with an awards ceremony held in Amsterdam.

To learn more, visit the World Press Photo website