Tag Archives: Photo Editor

TIME Picks the Top 10 Photos of 2012

Ten percent of all of the photographs made in the entire history of photography were made last year — an astounding figure. More than ever before, thanks in part to cell phone technology, the world is engaged with photography and communicating through pictures.

Nonetheless, a great photograph will rise above all the others. The ten photographs we present here are the pictures that moved us most in 2012. They all deliver a strong emotional impact — whether they show a child mourning his father who was killed by a sniper in Syria (slide #3); a heartbreaking scene in a Gaza City morgue (slide #1); a haunting landscape of New Jersey coastline after Hurricane Sandy, a rollercoaster submerged under the tide (slide #2); or a rare glimpse of President Obama moments before he goes out on stage during a campaign rally (slide #9). We spoke to each of the photographers about their images, and their words provide the captions here.

Over the past several days, we’ve unveiled TIME’s Best Photojournalism and Best Portraits of the Year galleries on LightBox. And in the next three weeks, we will be rolling out even more end-of-year features: the Most Surprising Pictures of the Year; the Best Photo Books of the Year; the Top 10 Photographic Magazine Covers of the Year and other compelling galleries. We will also recognize TIME’s choice for the Best Wire Photographer of the Year. Senior photo editor Phil Bicker is curating many of these galleries with help from the photo team at TIME. His discerning eye has been responsible for the curation of TIME’s Pictures of the Week throughout the year, galleries that regularly present the best of the week’s images, with surprising and sometimes offbeat takes on the news.  We will round off the year on December 31 with our second-annual “365: Year in Pictures,” a comprehensive look at the strongest picture of every day of 2012.

Kira Pollack, Director of Photography

Meg Handler

Some time ago, I happened to see this photograph on Facebook.  I was immediately drawn to the image and wanted to know more about the photographer, Meg Handler.

UFO Convention, Rosewell, New Mexico

What I wasn’t expecting when I e-mailed Meg, was what a generous and multi-talented photographer and editor she was.  And I love that it was from looking at one image I made a new friend. We recently spent the day together in Chicago and she helped me outfit my Rolleiflex with a flash, setting me on a new path to making photographs. I am sharing Meg’s project, Fans, today, created between 1994-2001.


Meg is a photo editor and documentary photographer. The former photo editor of The Village Voice, Meg  has also worked at U.S. News & World Report, Blender, New York Magazine, COLORS and Polaris Images. She has edited a number of books, including the monograph, Phil Stern: A Life’s Work, PAPARAZZI by Peter Howe, and POT CULTURE by Shirley Halperin and Steve Bloom. After 20 years of immersion in the photography business, and having worked with some of the great photographers in New York and abroad, Meg now lives in Chicago. She worked as the principle photographer for The Grant Park Music Festival at Millennium Park, and BIGArt at Navy Pier. Currently, assisting in the production of of BagNews Salons, Meg received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography from Rochester Institute of Technology.


Fans

I have looked at a lot of photographs over the years, working as a photo editor
for the Village Voice and numerous other publications, but decided to create a
series of my own work when I was inspired by a “Jesus Sighting”in
Washington Heights, New York. A few hundred people stood in line, gathered
in the courtyard of an apartment building to see an image of Christ in a
bathroom window. They saw it, I did not.
Even though I didn’t witness the second coming of Christ, I was intrigued by
the intensity of their experience and their desire to be in the company of
something that moved them deeply. If people are so enthralled by a vision,
what happens when they see their icons in real life? 


Papal Mass, Central Park, NYC

I decided to take a closer look at the phenomenon of FANS, every day people that want to rub up against some magic or star power at a Papal Mass in Central Park, football games, political rallies, a UFO convention and Graceland on the anniversary of Elvis Presley’s death. What I discovered was an almost universal reflection of adoration–the experience of the individual in the crowd, their dedication, commitment and faith becomes clear in their faces. 

Dalai Lama Visits New York

Gillian Anderson appearance, X-Files Convention

Papal Visit, Central Park, NYC

 Papal Visit, Central Park, NYC

 Mark, Barry Manilow fan

Buchanan Rally
Dalai Lama visits New York
Graceland

Graceland

Graceland

Graceland
Memphis

KISS Reunion Concert

KISS Reunion Concert

Jesus Sighting
Garth Brooks Concert, Central Park

World Series
Army v. Navy
Army v. Navy

Army v. Navy

Alien Autopsy

UFO Convention, Roswell, New Mexico
UFO Convention, Roswell, New Mexico

UFO Convention, Roswell, New Mexico

UFO Convention, Roswell, New Mexico

Slideluck Potshow London: Two highlights – Japan, I wish I knew your name by Pierfrancesco Celada and Mute: The Silence of Dogs by Martin Usborne

Slideluck Potshow London, organized by Mariateresa Salvati and invited to Brighton by the Miniclicks Photo Talks crew, held its first event in Brighton on Sunday to screen a selection of photos from past editions. 24 works were chosen by New Statesman photo editor, Rebecca McClelland, and artistic director and curator of QUAD and coFounder and director of FORMAT Festival, Louise Clements. As with Pecha Kucha, there is a particular formula for the events which take place in cities around the world. The event is free and is organised on a voluntary basis.

What is Slideshow Potluck?
“It is a NYC-based arts non-profit, operating in many cities globally, that aims to bring people together around food and art, and to give people an interesting, engaging, and fun platform for sharing art with their community.” From the website.

PIERFRANCESCO CELADA – JAPAN, I WISH I KNEW YOUR NAME

Japan, I wish I knew your name from pierfrancesco celada on Vimeo.

Pierfrancesco Celada is one to watch and his multimedia piece, Japan, I wish I knew your name, with its artful interplay of still photography, moving image and sound, was, for me, one of the highlights of the Slideshow. Why? Because the whole concept works really well as a multimedia work; it is well-conceived, wonderfully executed and is elevated by its aesthetic considerations, sequencing, use of camera shots and the ambient soundscapes. I was utterly transported for all 3mins 51 secs.

The work was produced at Magnum in Motion, New York, courtesy of Ideastap Photographic Award and received an Honourable Mention, Lensculture International Exposure Awards, 2011.

Celada writes: “During a brief visit to Japan in 2009 I was soon fascinated by the isolation and loneliness I was feeling in the streets. It started as a personal journey, a foreigner traveling in an alien environment. Language and cultural differences were only augmenting this distance between the locals and me. However, while observing people, it was clear that even indigenous were not able to interact successfully. I have then decided to come back in 2010 and better visualize these concepts.

“The Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka Megalopolis, also called Taiheiyō Belt is a unique example of urban agglomeration with an estimated population of over 80 million people. Despite this incredibly high number of chances to interact, it seems that society is moving in the opposite direction. The purpose of this investigation is to create awareness and highlight the problems that modernization and the rapid changes in the environment create in our lives. Is it still important to be, or feel, part of a group? Do we feel part of the environment? Are we alone in the crowd?” From the website.

MARTIN USBORNE – MUTE – THE SILENCE OF DOGS IN CARS


© Martin Osborne, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, 2012
I love Martin’s body of work, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, which was featured in Hotshoe magazine. So it was fantastic to see the collection of images as a slideshow and the immersion in the backroom of the Green Door in Brighton seemed to echo that of the dogs in the cars, especially as photographers were dotted round the room taking photos as we watched the show. (Note to organizers: I find that it disturbs my concentration when I’m watching a slideshow or film and I know that people are taking photos. What about after the show, rather than during?)

I really feel for these dogs and Martin does too. In fact, he cares so much that he’s set up A year to help blog where you can follow his progress as he attempts “to save all animals everywhere” in a year. I should put him in touch with my mum, who wants some of her ashes scattered in the Coliseum or Torre Argentina where the Gatti di Roma (Cats of Rome) have special status.

I love the text on his website too: “Martin lives in East London where he has his photographic studio. He is interested in the ever-curious and often disturbing relationship between humans and other animals.” However, if he reads this, there is the letter n missing from the first ‘and’ in the text on his site, I’ve added it here. Call me pedantic, but I’d rather mention it so that it can be rectified, than ignore it.

If you’re going to Paris Photo, Martin will be doing a book signing of Mute – The Silence of Dogs in Cars tomorrow at 4pm at the Kehrer Publishing stand, EE3. And if you miss this, you can catch the show in London next year from 19 March  – 27 April 2013 when it will be exhibited at The Little Black Gallery.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photographers blogs, Photography Shows, short films Tagged: brighton, HotShoe, Japan I wish I knew your name, Kehrer Publishing, Louise Clements, Mariateresa Salvati, Paris Photo, Pierfrancesco Celada, Rebecca McClelland, Slideluck Potshow Brighton, The Little Black Gallery, The Silence of Dogs

Sarah LaVigne and Picture Society

Colorado photo editor, Sarah LaVigne, is the Founder and President of Picture Society. Sarah was looking for new ways to to showcase renowned bodies of work from photographers around the world, and enliven those projects with music and insights from the photographers.  She wanted to inspire the Denver community with photography that was creative, personal, and educational–and Picture Society was born.  Sarah and her capable co-curator, Julia Vandenoever, also a photo editor, produce one presentation a year–in 2011 Picture Society showcased Timothy Achibald’s Echolilia, Annie Marie Musselman’s Finding Trust, Sara Forrest’s New Roots for Refugees, Michael Lewis’ Self Portraits, Matt Slaby’s Hole in the Wall Gang, Susana Raab’s Off Season, and Noelle Swan Gilbert’s Life After Death. The 2012 showcase is being offered to the Denver community on October 26th at the Space Gallery.  The Picture Society has plans to share the presentation elsewhere.  Featured photographers are  Alejandro Cartagena (Monterrey, Mexico), Aline Smithson (Los Angeles), Andy Anderson (Mountain Home, Idaho), Benjamin Rasmussen (Denver), Kendall Messick (New York, NY), Susan A. Barnett (New York, NY).
A native of the East Coast, Sarah is the Photo Editor at 5280 Magazine
“The Denver Magazine” and has also been a Photo Editor at National
Geographic Adventure, Men’s Journal, Best Life, and SKI magazines.
LaVigne holds an MFA in Photography from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn,
New York, where she began her career in picture making and editing. Her
photo editing work has been recognized by the American Photography
Association and the Society of Publication Designers. Sarah also
curates photography shows locally and does portfolio reviews across the
Southwest region.
I thought it would be interesting to find out more about why she created Picture Society, so I asked!

What is your background?

I began photographing at a young age, it was the
first art form that I ever used and also had a passion for magazine making. My
first publication was called Pens & Pencils where I sold subscriptions for $1 for a
series of stories and poems that I wrote. I was six years old. After performing
music in high school and college and a short career as an environmental
activist I began study at the Pratt Institute where I received an MFA in
Photography. My career started as a photography intern at National Geographic
Adventure Magazine in New York City. My first edit was a shoot from South Africa
from the late Bobby Model. I was hooked. Sabine Meyer, the Director of
Photography at NGA was been a mentor ever since. I continued on to picture edit
for Men’s Journal, Best Life, SKI and now 5280: Denver Magazine. Continuing
my link with fine art world and felt a need in Denver for a photography exhibit of
contemporary narrative work and so I curate a show titled Things As They Are at
Space Gallery in 2007.


How did Picture Society come about?

At the time of my curatorial debut I
wanted to focus heavily on the personal work of editorial photographers. I knew
that the photographers I was working with at the magazine had personal work
that should be seen. I knew that there were financial and some logistical limits to
putting up a show every few months so I thought of a way that would be less
expensive and different for photographers and viewers. I have a background in
music and some performance and respond to soundtracks in film and wanted to
have an event that incorporated photography and music. I was doing portfolio
reviews at the Telluride Photo Festival and got inspiration after reviewing to do
another show in Denver but something that was different than anything that was
being done. Not only did I continue with this venture to bring award winning
photography three years ago working with Laura Pressley.

What are you goals for the organization? 
My hope is to continue to curate and
put on shows throwout the state and strat doing shows in LA, and other cities. I
want to continue to show work to audiences where I know there is a need.
Education is a large component which is touch upon with the audio interviews.
My goal is to continue to grow and be a part of school curriculums in Fine art
Graduates programs.

How do you find the photographers?

Some photographers are people that I
have assigned for magazines I’ve work for and other I meet at portfolio reviews,
Review Santa Fe most recently. Julia Vandenoever who co curates has similar
editorial experience and an eye for great work.
What has been the reaction from audiences from this approach to
presenting photography? People love it. I get many comments about the audio
portion, hearing from the photographers. It is different and people really enjoy
hearing the artists speak. They love the work we’ve shown so far and I get
compliments on my music picks.

Who is your audience? 

Collectors, photographers, and some people that are
not familiar at all with photography.

Photographers featured in the 2012 Picture Story

Alejandro Cartagena, images from Car Poolers

Aline Smithson, images from Daughter 

Andy Anderson, images from Death Valley

Benjamin Rasmussen, images from Home

Susan A. Barnett, images from Not in Your Face

A Young Mitt Romney’s Other Mission: Romance

Before there was Romney the presidential candidate, there was Romney the romantic. In this week’s cover story, Jon Meacham looks at how Romney’s identity was shaped by his Mormon roots. To illustrate this formative time in the presidential candidate’s life, we turned to a surprising photo found in the archives that shows the rarely-seen personal side of the candidate.

On a recent cover shoot I asked Romney about the image and found out that around 1968, while serving as a Mormon missionary in France, a young Mitt made several photographs with the help of his LDS friends.He described how the photo was taken, explaining that it was playfully staged for his high school girlfriend and soon-to-be wife, Ann Davies. Romney revealed that the photo is actually one of a series made during his time abroad.

The pictoral gesture worked. carrera de fotografia . Davies joined the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints prior to marrying Romney in 1969, only months after Romney returned to the U.S. The pair later attended Brigham Young University before settling in Massachusetts, where they raised five sons together.

Paul Moakley is the Deputy photo editor of TIME.

Jonathan Blaustein

We all feel possessive about the things we own — our homes, our cars, our belongings, but we often have to share those spaces and items with other life forms, life forms that intersect our lives in large and small ways.  Many of us don’t consider the dust mites or the silverfish or the occasional raccoon as interrupting our spaces, but in the case of photographer Jonathan Blaustein , he has lots to consider. Living in New Mexico on a property that sits squarely in the natural world, he has had to think about what else is occupying the land. His new series, Mine, explores the plant and animal life he encounters, life forms that could be missed in the pastures of New Mexico, if he didn’t take the time to witness their presence.


Currently living in Northern New Mexico, Jonathan received a degree in Economics and History at Duke University, and an MFA in Photography at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.  He has exhibited widely and his work is held in many significant museum collections.  His projects, Value of a Dollar and Mine, have both been published by the New York Times.  Jonathan also writes about photography and culture for A Photo Editor blog.

MINE: I live in
a horse pasture at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. I own the land:
it’s MINE. But I share it with the animals, and
things that don’t move. Every night, when I go to sleep, they have the run of
the place.

It’s theirs.

Only a creature as arrogant
as a human would claim ownership over his dominion, while living for such a
short period of time. The rocks o
n my land are all much older than I am.



Artists are more infatuated with immortality than most people. We make marks, build things, and snap photos, all in the hope that we’ll be remembered when we’re gone. Deep down, we all have a dark desire that the art will be preserved, along with our name, and that people will look at it in a hundred years or more. Because the alternative is bleak. An eternity of nothing. Ashes to ashes. Dust to dust.

I’m no different. I want my life’s work to mean something. I don’t want to disappear forever. But I also don’t think that my land belongs to me, any more than I belong to the land. I’m just part of this world, run by a simple rule: Survival of the fittest.



With that in mind, I decided to objectify my land, to leave my mark. Because I could. In so doing, I was able to investigate my territory, to sift through the dirt, to crunch up the snow, and then share it with others.

Once I harvested the objects, I took them to my studio to fashion temporary sculptures: Art pieces meant to satisfy my unquenchable desire to symbolize the world around me. I photographed the sculptures to memorialize them, just as we take pictures every day to remember what was there.

And yes, I killed the dead baby mouse. I killed his whole family. They were living in the trunk of my car, and they just wouldn’t leave. So I did what I had to do.

Photo Resource – Free guide to Selling Nature Photography from Photoshelter

If you want some tips for getting your nature photos out there, sign up for a free PDF guide Selling Nature Photography. The guide has been compiled by Photoshelter in partnership with Outdoor Photographer and offers tips to grow your nature photography business with interviews from leading photographers like Art Wolfe, Jerry Monkman and Martin Bailey. It also include insights from experienced photo buyers, including the Senior Photo Editor at National Geographic.

  • Six questions to ask yourself before pitching editorial clients
  • Seven tips to get your nature photography featured in public spaces
  • How to turn your passion into a thriving business
  • Why storytelling and nature photography go hand and hand
  • Why being persistent in your business and protecting your interests is a must.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Products Tagged: free photo guide, nature photography, Outdoor Photographer, PhotoShelter, Selling Nature Photography

Articles | Sunday 17 June 2012

Let’s start with the unexpected news coming from Getty Images: Eugene Richards, the celebrated documentary photographer, has left the Reportage agency. Richards used to be with Magnum Photos but left twice. He was also with VII Photo for a couple of years, and had joined Reportage in 2010.

Reportage by Getty Images: Eugene Richards

BJP: Eugene Richards leaves Reportage by Getty Images

On the subject of Getty Images, they announced a few things these past few weeks.

PetaPixel: Getty Images Changes Watermark from Annoying Logo to Useful Shortlink

PDN Pulse: Getty Images Preps for IPO?

An interesting development in the photographic and multimedia markets, Brian Storm has started charging for some of MediaStorm’s presentation. Rite of Passage by Maggie Steber and A Shadow Remains by Phillip Toledano are the first two pieces to test MediaStorm’s Pay Per Story scheme. Each story can be bought for $1.99.

 

MediaStorm: Why We Switched to a Pay Per Story Model

PDN Pulse: MediaStorm Now Charging to View its Stories

TIME Lightbox: Game Changer – MediaStorm Launches Pay-Per-Story Video Player

Duckrabbit: Maggie Steber responds to critics of MediaStorm’s new pay to view model

VII Photo has been weathering a controversy lately…

VII Photo: Statement

Ron Haviv: Response

Conscientious: Quality journalism, photography and integrity

David Campbell: Photo agencies and ethics: the individual and the collective

And when we’re on the subject of VII Photo, they have also added four young photographers to their mentor programme.

Now, let’s share some business and practical tips:

Justin Mott: Advice to Veteran Photographers

A Photo Editor: How does a photographer land an agent?

A Photo Editor: Pricing & Negotiation: Spokesperson Advertising Shoot

PhotoShelter: A Photographer’s Guide to a Successful Gallery Opening

PhotoShelter: What Buyers and Photo Editors Want

PhotoShelter: Personality Traits & Skills Photo Buyers Don’t Want in Photographers

Salon: How to stop the bleeding

Chris Hondros. Image © Nicole Tung

PetaPixel: US Department of Justice Defends Photographers’ Right to Record Police

Some thoughts about the industry, reviews and round-ups…

The New York Times: Just When You Got Digital Technology, Film is Back

TIME Lightbox: Three War Photographers: Feel Fear, Keep Going

NY Daily News: Iconic ‘napalm girl’ photo from Vietnam War turns 40

Peter Dench: The Dench Diary (December – February 2012)

Conscientious: Review of Unknown Quantities by Olivia Arthur, Dominic Nahr, Moises Saman, and Peter Van Agtmael

PhotoShelter: The Look3 Festival Round-Up

TIME Lightbox: Curators Look Ahead to Look3

PDN Pulse: Look3 – Alex Webb on his Creative Process, Kodachrome, and Magnum

PDN Pulse: Look 3 Report: Donna Ferrato on Philip Jones Griffiths, Don McCullin, and Complicated Relationships

Reuters Blog: The Secret Handshake

The Guardian: Burtynsky: Oil review

Image © Edward Burtynsky.

The Guardian: The Photographers’ Gallery Reopens

NYT Lens Blog: Caught Between the Protests and the Police

NYT Lens Blog: Half Photos, Striving to be More

NYT Lens Blog: A Gift to New York from Gordon Parks

The New Yorker Photo Booth: Great Mistakes: Olivia Arthur

The Guardian: Featured Photojournalist – Joe Raedle

Conscientious Extended: Photography and Place: Appalachia

One Image at a Time: Image #4, Comfort Women 1996

DVAPhoto: Worth a look: Revolution Revisited by Kim Komenich and University of Miami multimedia grad students

Press Association: Jacobs in administration

Verve Photo: Antonio Bolfo

The Guardian: Lawrence Schiller’s best photograph: Marilyn Monroe

TIME Lightbox: Photographs of the ‘Great British Public’ in London

Foam Blog: Ahmet Polat on Instagram

Reuters Blog: Tribute to Danilo Krstanovic

And to finish…

The Marie Colvin Memorial Fund.