Tag Archives: Photo District News

Tearsheet of The Day | Yuri Kozyrev photo of Saddam’s ‘rat hole’ in FT Weekend

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, unveiled their survey of war photography, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath, on Armistice Day yesterday. The FT Weekend magazine featured some of the work from the exhibition in their latest issue. You can view the FT article and slideshow here.  You can also read about the show over at Photo District News, which interviewed the exhibition’s curators.

Below war in Iraq photograph from 2003 by Yuri Kozyrev, which FT Weekend ran as a double truck.

p. 20-21. FT Weekend Magazine. November 10/11 2012 issue.
Photo © Yuri Kozyrev.
“A journalist climbs out of the hole where toppled dictator Saddam Hussein was captured in Ad Dawr. Iraq’s defeated leader raised his arms out of his ‘rat hole’ and said he was Saddam Hussein and that he wanted to negotiate. “ Iraq. December 15, 2003. Inkjet print.

Yuri Kozyrev (Russian, b. 1963) is a member of Noor Images and a contract photographer with Time magazine.

Peter Liepke

It’s not a secret that I love all things New York City.  When Jay Z’s Empire State of Mind comes on the radio, it sends me right back to those years of feeling like everything was possible when I strode down Fifth Avenue.  And today’s post on Peter Liepke’s terrific work brings me back to that feeling of complete adoration for the Big Apple. Here’s hoping it weathers hurricane Sandy safely.

Peter Liepke creates New York images that feel like charcoal drawings, timeless in their appeal and magical in their effect.

Peter was born St. Louis Park, Minnesota.  In 1979 he moved from Minneapolis to Los Angeles to attend Art Center and later opened an advertising photography studio in Los Angeles. His client roster included Chiat/Day, Daily &Assoc, J Walter Thompson, American Honda, Sunkist, FTD. After the 1987 Los Angeles earthquake, Peter decided to move to New York City, and in 1988 reinvented himself as a fine art portraitist. Peter resides in upstate New York with his wife, and two sons. His articles and  photographs have been published in PHOTOGRAPHIS, GRAPHIS Showcase, Photo District News, Town & Country, B&Wmagazine, The Photo Review, View Camera, Silvershots , The Book of Alternative Processes and numerous other publications.

 My series “ABOVE & BEYOND” is the most ambitious fine art project I’ve done to date since leaving the commercial photography world. The images shown here are only a small portion of the entire project. The series is still very much in production, and when completed will comprise at least 40 images or more.

The inspiration comes from a city that I love, where I met my wife, and where many artists from around the country still flock to today. 

Some of my collectors have said that perhaps it might be my own personal and visual love letter to New York City. I suppose maybe that’s partly true in a small way, but for me it’s much more than just that or showing “pretty pictures”. To me the series is much more about breaking away and chasing a dream. After growing up in suburban Minnesota…as an artist, like many before me, and many more who will continually arrive in NYC each day, we embrace the challenge of wanting to broaden our lives by moving into a bigger arena. So for this series I wanted to go back and try to remember my feelings or first impressions upon arriving in NYC as an outsider for the first time well over twenty years ago.

 It’s easy to be overwhelmed by the noise, and feel isolated or lonely despite being surrounded by a sea of humanity. It’s much more difficult to look beyond that which is what I chose to do then, and now. As I continue to seek out, explore, and experience my own sense of place, the reality becomes clear that each of us are small but very valuable individual pieces of a much larger jigsaw puzzle. 

My vision for illustrating the project is the challenge of looking beyond the gritty streets by depicting an urban atmosphere with beauty, utilizing a more intimate cinematic approach engaging the viewer, as opposed to the current more popular trend in contemporary photography of massive sized prints overly saturated with color. The series when completed, will total at least 40 images or more culminating in to a published book, 3 different editions of small handmade platinum palladium collector portfolios, a special photogravure edition, and large limited edition of framed prints all sold and distributed through my galleries.

Rachel Hulin, Picnic

Rachel Hulin, Picnic

Rachel Hulin

Picnic,
Storrs, Connecticut, 2012
Website – RachelHulin.com

Rachel Hulin is a writer and photographer. Her work has been shown at Jen Bekman Gallery, The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Wallspace Gallery, and The New York Photo Festival. She has written about photography for Photo District News, Emerging Photographer Magazine, Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, and The Faster Times. She is editor and co-founder of The Photography Post. Her first book — A children's photography book about a flying baby — will be published by powerHouse in April 2013.

Photoville: Established 2012; Population Growing

Photography doesn’t usually have the problem that it’s too noisy an art form, but that was exactly the challenge that faced the organizers of Photoville, a new photo festival that will open in Brooklyn, New York, on June 22. One of the major components of the show is an exhibit inside a warren of industrial shipping containers. Forty-two of them, to be exact, laid out in a maze carefully planned with both exploration and safety in mind.

Sam Barzilay

Viewers check out photography in a shipping container at a past United Photo Industries event.

“Getting a container is simple. Getting 42 of them placed in an intricate pattern is complicated. The most complicated thing is they’ll show up, they’ll dump it and they’ll drive away. I’ve learned that their preferred hour of doing that is 4:30 in the morning,” says Sam Barzilay, formerly of the New York Photo Festival, who is one of the three minds behind the festival. “Dumping a container as it grinds off the truck onto cobblestone is about the loudest thing I’ve ever heard.”

But when the festival opens, the containers will be there, full of photos. And that won’t be all: Photoville will also include about 1000 feet of fencing covered with community-centric photography, presentations from organizations like the Magnum Foundation and Photo District News, a number of workshops and even a beer garden and a dog run with a dog photo booth. And it’s all completely free.

Photoville is the product of United Photo Industries, a year-old cooperative comprising Sam Barzilay, Laura Roumanos and Dave Shelley. Barzilay says that the idea behind the event, and United Photo Industries’ other projects, is the realization that New York real estate affects the art scene. Empty storefronts have meant that small pop-up galleries have been relatively accessible during the last few years, but that won’t last forever. “The writing on the wall was sooner or later the economy would pick up again and people will be back in business, opening the stores,” says Barzilay. “Those spaces weren’t going to last.” They wanted to figure out a way to continue to present artwork without the overhead needed for a giant space. And once the shipping-container idea struck, the ideas just kept coming.

The end result is meant to appeal to photographers and civilians alike. “Even though it’s the most easily relatable art medium at this point, because everybody carries a camera, I think a lot of the time people are afraid of photography exhibitions,” says Barzilay. “We’re trying to cater to a full spectrum of people. I want people to come and enjoy it.” That’s why the free and open model is so important to the organization.

Barzilay and Shelley have both worked for the New York Photo Festival in the past, but Photoville is not meant to be competition for the more established festival. New York is big enough and “art-loving enough” to support many festivals, says Barzilay—and, besides, Photoville isn’t even meant to be a festival in a traditional sense of the word. “We’re trying to build a destination, trying to build a place where you go and spend a day listening to lectures and participating in a workshop, probably having a beer, to bring your dog to the dog run,” he says. “It’s a place to spend physical time with the photography, not so much as a passive viewer.”

Photoville will be held in Brooklyn from June 22 through July 1. More information about the event is available here.

See more work from Bruce Gilden, one of Photoville’s featured photographers, here.

Side by Side | Carrying sharks in Mogadishu by Grarup 2012 and Omar 2010

Jan Grarup’s series The Mayor of Mogadishu featured on Photo District News here.  There’s a related article as well.

Frame 3 of the slideshow shows a man carrying a shark on the streets of Mogadishu. Striking scene even if you’ve seen it before.

Reminded me of Reuters stringer Feisal Omar’s 2011 World Press Photo Daily Life single prize winning photo.

Grarup’s and Omar’s photos both appear having been taken in the same street.

Man carrying a shark in Mogadishu, Somalia.
Left: © Jan Grarup 2012
Right: © Feisal Omar 2010.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • The National Press Photographers Association announce “The Best of Photojournalism 2012,” this week. For aspiring hopefuls, the Photo Brigade posts “10 Tips for Photojournalism Students,” and Phototuts+ shares an article on “Building a Narrative Through Photojournalism.” The British Journal of Photography reports that the Carmignac Gestion Foundation is currently calling for entries for its annual Photojournalism Award, which comes with a €50,000 grant.
  • New York Times‘ LENS blog profiles Binh Danh who works with a fascinating chemical-free alternative process known as chlorophyl printing–using sunlight to burn in monochrome images onto leaves, grass and other vegetation. His series “Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War” features a decade of work printing images of “suffering civilians, soldiers on patrol and the dead,” in an attempt to recapture the experience of that war.
  • A wide-ranging conversation about the ethics of conflict photography and how images are sold commercially has sprung up around the use of an image licensed to Lockheed Martin. Read Ron Haviv and VII responses to the initial criticism raised by Benjamin Chesterton of Duckrabbit, who takes issue with the use of a Haviv image commercially licensed by the arms manufacturer. Further commentary and assessment on the thorny issues of how to make, sell, and use — or not — images created during conflict are added by Michael ShawColin Pantall, and Stella Kramer
  • Photo District News posts “Favorite Sources of New Photography” Part 1 and Part 2, a feature in which they ask photo editors from publications like The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, New York, Time, The New Yorker, and many more including our own publisher Lesley A. Martin, where they find inspiration for new work.
  • What effect might increased scrutiny or transparency over digital image manipulation have on our visual culture? Poytner reports that a new software suite is in development by the former Adobe product manager for Photoshop that would detect the alteration of digital images. AdWeek explores what effect these attitudes might have on commercial photography in the wake of the pivotal ruling by the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus that a certain fashion ad was not “truthful and accurate” and thus a “public health hazard.”
  • More on Richard Misrach this week, whose monograph Golden Gate is soon to be reissued by Aperture on the occasion of the anniversary of the bridge, which turned 75 last Sunday. Time’s LightBox profiles “Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley,” on view at the High Museum from June 2, 2012, as does CNN Photos with a slightly different slideshow edit. The series features images from his other upcoming collaborative photobook with Kate Off, Petrochemical America, profiled by the Huffington Post in “Beautiful Ambivalence: The World Through the Lens of Richard Misrach.”
  • In exploring the future of photography, Hilde Van Gelder looks at its past in “What Has Photography Done?” on Fotomuseum Winterthur’s blog Still Searching. She outlines two dominant tracks–the “autonomous pictorial art,” that gets absorbed into the museum and the canon, and that which “comments on the social and economic reality in which we live and thus actively take[s] part in transformative social processes,”–and opens up a conversation on the public funding of institutions.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • The National Press Photographers Association announce “The Best of Photojournalism 2012,” this week. For aspiring hopefuls, the Photo Brigade posts “10 Tips for Photojournalism Students,” and Phototuts+ shares an article on “Building a Narrative Through Photojournalism.” The British Journal of Photography reports that the Carmignac Gestion Foundation is currently calling for entries for its annual Photojournalism Award, which comes with a €50,000 grant.
  • New York Times‘ LENS blog profiles Binh Danh who works with a fascinating chemical-free alternative process known as chlorophyl printing–using sunlight to burn in monochrome images onto leaves, grass and other vegetation. His series “Immortality, The Remnants of the Vietnam and American War” features a decade of work printing images of “suffering civilians, soldiers on patrol and the dead,” in an attempt to recapture the experience of that war.
  • A wide-ranging conversation about the ethics of conflict photography and how images are sold commercially has sprung up around the use of an image licensed to Lockheed Martin. Read Ron Haviv and VII responses to the initial criticism raised by Benjamin Chesterton of Duckrabbit, who takes issue with the use of a Haviv image commercially licensed by the arms manufacturer. Further commentary and assessment on the thorny issues of how to make, sell, and use — or not — images created during conflict are added by Michael ShawColin Pantall, and Stella Kramer
  • Photo District News posts “Favorite Sources of New Photography” Part 1 and Part 2, a feature in which they ask photo editors from publications like The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, New York, Time, The New Yorker, and many more including our own publisher Lesley A. Martin, where they find inspiration for new work.
  • What effect might increased scrutiny or transparency over digital image manipulation have on our visual culture? Poytner reports that a new software suite is in development by the former Adobe product manager for Photoshop that would detect the alteration of digital images. AdWeek explores what effect these attitudes might have on commercial photography in the wake of the pivotal ruling by the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus that a certain fashion ad was not “truthful and accurate” and thus a “public health hazard.”
  • More on Richard Misrach this week, whose monograph Golden Gate is soon to be reissued by Aperture on the occasion of the anniversary of the bridge, which turned 75 last Sunday. Time’s LightBox profiles “Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley,” on view at the High Museum from June 2, 2012, as does CNN Photos with a slightly different slideshow edit. The series features images from his other upcoming collaborative photobook with Kate Off, Petrochemical America, profiled by the Huffington Post in “Beautiful Ambivalence: The World Through the Lens of Richard Misrach.”
  • In exploring the future of photography, Hilde Van Gelder looks at its past in “What Has Photography Done?” on Fotomuseum Winterthur’s blog Still Searching. She outlines two dominant tracks–the “autonomous pictorial art,” that gets absorbed into the museum and the canon, and that which “comments on the social and economic reality in which we live and thus actively take[s] part in transformative social processes,”–and opens up a conversation on the public funding of institutions.

Submit!


Entry Deadline:May 7, 2012
play
:  amuse oneself, be the life of the party, portray, caper, carouse,
cavort, impersonate, clown, frolic, perform, joke, jump, rejoice, have
fun, theatrical performance, tickle, produce music, merriment, laughter

 Juror: Angela Bacon Kidwell

More info here!

PCNW Presents: 

EQUIVALENTS: 17TH ANNUAL PHOTO COMPETITION EXHIBITION

Deadline: May 18th
Juror: W.M Hunt

More info here!

THE PERFECT EXPOSURE GALLERY: Perfect Exposures 2012, an International Juried Competition

 

Deadline: June 4th, 2012
More information here!

In addition to presenting fine art photography exhibits, The Perfect Exposure Gallery has a long-standing reputation for working with a distinguished group of acclaimed photojournalists to produce ongoing seminars and workshops for both adults and youths. Now, we are giving amateur and professional photographers the grand opportunity to win cash prizes and a spot in our two-month-long summer exhibit. 


Our panel of judges consists of award-winning photographers, photo editors, and educators: 
Eli Reed 
Jose Aurelio Barrera
Aline Smithson
Armando Arorizo

(UN) FAMILIAR:CURATOR’S VOICE 

Presented by the American Photographic Artists
Juror: Gwen Lafage, from the Carte Blanche Gallery, San Francisco

 For the first APA SF Curator’s Voice Exhibition, we asked Gwen Lafage, founder of Carte Blanche Gallery in San Francisco, to select a small group of photographers to exhibit their finest images in her gallery.
CALL FOR ENTRIES OPENS
Monday, April 9, 2012
CALL FOR ENTRIES FINAL DEADLINE
Noon, PDT, Monday, May 7, 2012
WINNERS ANNOUNCED
Wednesday, May 30, 2012
WINNERS’ FRAMED IMAGES DUE
Wednesday, June 20, 2012 

CONTEST THEME
Theme: (Un)Familiar

As a photographer, how do you explore and interpret the familiar and the unfamiliar? How do your vision and/or perspective(s) change when faced with places and people you know, versus when you are confronted by the unknown, or by strangers you meet by chance? Traveling, discovering new places and meeting new people creatively stimulates many photographers, while others find inspiration in the comfort of their home, hometown or among their friends and families.

This competition invites photographers to submit a series of photographs interpreting the theme (Un)Familiar, along with a brief statement or project proposal supporting their entry. We are looking for a wide interpretation of the theme and therefore a wide range of imagery; your photographs can be visualizations of the Familiar, the Unfamiliar, or both. Your statement needs to quickly present your project and explain why you believe it fits with the chosen theme. Ideally, your proposal should help us understand how, or if you adapt your photographic process based on your relationship to and/or intimacy with the subject or environment being depicted.