Tag Archives: Photo Activities

Re runs: Verner Soler

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with Verner Soler that was featured in January, 2009.

After growing up in a Swiss village, population 250, Verner Soler, has a unique window into a world we’ve only seen in the movies. Juggling a full plate as an art director, husband, and father, Verner does not get back to the village as often as he would like to. Several years ago, after being struck by how much his parents had aged between his visits, he decided to take definitive portraits of his parents, and more recently, has completed the typology with members of his extended family. It’s a powerful and fascinating series of genetics and love, (and for those of us living in Los Angeles, incredibly refreshing to see real faces). He will also be sharing images from his visits to Switzerland at Review LA.

From Heads (Grandmother, Mother, Father)

From Visits to My Village

Re Runs: Kevin J Miyazaki

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Kevin Miyazaki that ran in 2009. Kevin is the creator and the heart behind the program, Collect.Give.  His teaching blog is a gold mine of interviews and information.

Everything Kevin Miyazaki creates is clever, evocative, elegant, and smart…from his statement, to his clean website, great blog, and of course, amazing work. He manages to balance fine art and commercial work with equal grace, and has an impressive client list. Kevin also has had work featured on 20×200 and has created a booklet of observations, for sale on his site.

The work featured below is from Camp Home, a series where Kevin set out to explore his father’s experience during WW II in a concentration camp in Tule Lake, California. The original barracks were built on a dry lake bed, then later given to returning veterans, and now are used as barns and homes. Kevin was able to capture the current world of Tule Lake, but also managed to find the fingerprints of the families that lived there without choice.

“The series is part architectural, part archeological. While Miyazaki’s initial fascination was with the current structures — how the barracks that stood so prominent in his family lore had been built upon and abandoned by other families, transformed for other uses — he also discovered a treasure trove of modest artifacts that he felt captured an important “human element”. He found bottles, baseballs, decorations that had remained behind from some family that had passed through there — perhaps not his own family, and not in the same circumstances, but perhaps in some way like his own — faded through decades of disuse.”

Re Runs: Sarah Hadley

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Sarah Hadley that ran in 2009. Sarah is now the Director of the Filter Photo Festival in Chicago, coming up in October.


Chicago photographer, Sarah Hadley, has packed her suitcases and moved to Los Angeles, and the left coast is lucky to have her. Sarah works both as a fine art and editorial photographer, and manages to have a piled-high plate of awards, grants, and exhibitions. Much of Sarah’s fine art work has a reference to dreams, whether it be imagery of the space where we dream the most in Unconscious Terrain, or dreamy interpretations of places around the world.

I think every photographer talks about the magic of seeing that first image appear in a tray of developer and of being hooked for life. I believe a good photograph asks more questions than it answers, and my photography is a way for me to constantly challenge myself to really look at the world around me.

Images from Unconscious Terrain

There is something intangible about the best photographs, something that reminds us of the moment between wake and sleep, and of the beauty that we see and feel but cannot describe, and of our own mortality. These are the kinds of images I try to make.

Images from Venetian Dreams

Re Runs: Kyohei Abe

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Kyohei Abe that ran in 2009 after I saw his work at Photolucida. Kyohei is now the Director of the Detroit Center for Contemporary Photography and continues with his own fine art work. I’m adding a few images from his newer work to bring you up to speed.


Kyohei Abe’s work was unlike most at Photolucida. His clean, conceptual work is incredibly appealing and though he doesn’t reveal his intentions, the power of the imagery leaves room for imagination and contemplation.

Kyohei was born in Nagoya, Japan and earned his Bachelor’s Degree of Science in Architecture from Trident College in Japan. He later moved to the United States and began studying photography at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit, Michigan. He earned a BFA with a concentration in Photography and then Kyohei graduated from Cranbrook Academy in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, earning a MFA in Photography. Currently, he is a Special Lecturer in Digital Media at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan.

images from Modern translation

images from New work

images from Imaginary scape

Re Runs: Andrew Sanderson

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Andrew Sanderson that ran in 2009.


Andrew Sanderson has been a professional photgrapher for over two decades and “has established an international reputation as both teacher and practitioner of the photographic medium.” He’s also an author of three books, Night Photography, Hand Colouring and Alternative Darkroom Processes, and Home Photography. His articles can be found in magazines such as AG, Camera and Creative Photography, Photo Art International, and Black and White Magazine UK. He also has a blog, The Darkroom.

Andrew has an uncanny abililty create timeless images, where one finds difficulity in pinpointing they decade they reflect. He is an Ilford master printer, is recognized as the leading practitioner of the paper negative process and one of the world’s best hand colorists, and well known for his night photography.

Images from Night
Images from Children

Re Runs: Hisaji Hara

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Hisaji Hara that ran in 2010.


Many photographers, myself included, are inspired by painters. Toyko photographer Hisaji Hara has reproduced art works by Balthus in timeless black and white imagery.

Hara’s tranquil monochrome portraits look strangely familiar — and indeed, all are modeled after paintings by Balthus (1908-2001), one of the most revered artists of the 20th century. Although the figures and background furnishings are not identical to the originals, the compositions are. Through this tableau-vivant-like approach, Hara somehow manages to capture the essence of Balthus’s works.


photograph of Balthus and his wife

Images by Hisaji Hara followed by the paintings that inspired them.

Summer Re Runs: Kevin Thrasher

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with Kevin Thrasher.

Kevin Thrasher’s images have a wonderful combination of unsettling charm. He has a knack of finding moments and locations that while normal and natural, also leave room for alternate interpretations. Born in Birmingham, Alabama and now living in Richmond, Virginia, Kevin received his BFA from East Tennessee State University and his MFA from Massachusetts College of Art in Boston. He had a long list of exhibitions in 2010 including the forthcoming Collectors Guide to Emerging Art Photography published by the Humble Arts Foundation in NYC.

Photography seemed like the only option that I wanted to pursue in school. I wish there were a more glamorous way to talk about the choices that led me to photography, but photography was the only thing that I ever thought I really wanted to do over a lifetime. Photography made sense. Making photographs is a way for me to go out into familiar or unfamiliar places and discover things. I like going out and getting lost in a new place and making pictures there. The world is an awfully interesting place and you can make work where ever you are.

His series, Common Ground, looks at how we interact with the natural world, and the series Brown’s Island is a work in with similar themes but focusing on a specific place.

There is no pristine landscape. There is only the land that we have. We got to nature or other more socially controlled spaces to enjoy ourselves. Recreation takes us from our own backyards, to other places where we can connect with nature or experience moments of leisure.

The photographs exist in between accepted ideas of landscape and these newer more controlled spaces. People are making the best of the spaces that they have access to. Many of the locales often sustain the idea of community where people are drawn together for mutual purpose. We have come to accept these interstitial spaces as our nature.

Images from Brown’s Island

Summer Re Runs: Alek Lindus

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, starting with Alek Lindus.

Alek Lindus is a woman of the world. Born in Paris, educated in the UK, and currently living in Samos, Greece. No matter where she makes her bed, her images are intimate, perceptive, and layered. Alek is an avid analogue shooter and her images reflect the sublties and nuances that come from using film.

Images from Fragile
A selection of images from various series