Tag Archives: Personal Statements

High and Low: Jim Goldberg’s Works in Process

Although a photographers process is integral to his/her work, it is often a carefully guarded secret. Most photographers tend to keep the development of their work to themselves, sometimes choosing to seek counsel only from a small circle of trusted friends.

It comes as a surprise, then, to find Magnum photographer Jim Goldbergs reworked sketches, videos and maquettes of his groundbreaking books openly shared online.

For Goldberga photographer whose approach has always been eclectic, evolving, and utilizing other mediums, including textthe very act of sharing these works in progress is an important and formative part of the final product.

Goldberg talked to LightBox about the process of revisiting, sharing and republishing two of his groundbreaking works. Rich and Poor (1977-85) juxtaposes two economic classes through intimate environmental portraits and personal statements written on the prints by the subjects, while Raised by Wolves (1985-95) documents the lives of homeless runaways in San Francisco and Los Angeles through photographs, text, drawings and interviews.

Being a teacher for so long, Ive realized that so much of what you teach students is about learning to respect the importance of process. Watching students grow is interestingand them observing my process helps them see that its not that mysterious of a thing to do. In order to figure this artmaking stuff out, its trial and error and experimentation, and takes some time and hard thinking. Putting work out in many forms and stages is an extension of how I see things. I feel the art process is best served when it invites comments and constructive criticism from people. Its a strategic gesture, too, because the feedback I receive helps me move forward with my ideas, which is what process is aboutto craft and evolve something.

Rich and Poor

I was invited by Steidl to republish Rich and Poor. Up to this point my archive was mostly analog. proveedor factura electrnica . Revisiting Rich and Poor meant that it was time to start digitizing my older work. I started by going through all of my contact sheets and re-editing. My studio ended up scanning a lot of images that were never printed in the original book, which in turn gave me a way to experience my old work with a beginners mind. This got me excited about seeing things I had passed over years before during my original edit. When I originally made the work, I was getting so much positive feedback about how I was using images with text that the stand-alone images fell by the wayside. Or perhaps back then I didnt have the courage to include images that functioned simply as straight photographs.

Revisiting the archive excited me on many levels. The freshness of my youth particularly resonated with me, but it also gave me thirty years of distance to look back at these images. Aside from the overall nostalgic patina, I feel like I was looking at these images with a critical distance for the first time. Im now able to separate my own impulses with the overarching history/context of what was happening in the 70s and 80s.

I also wanted to conceptually tie the past in with the present and so decided to revisit a few of the original subjects and map where they are today. I plan to include this in the new Rich and Poor edition via a small insert of contemporary imagery.

Raised by Wolves

Raised by Wolves has been out of print for some time, which has made it expensive and difficult to findso people are constantly asking me for it. Its also been almost 20 years since the book was published, so I felt it would be a good time to put it back on the table as something to look at again, as well as digitize.

Raised by Wolves was a good ten years of working with the kids; collecting ephemera;and making the exhibition and the book.

Still when it came time for the book and exhibition to be produced, and all the deadlines were mounting, aesthetic choices had to be made quickly as to what would be included and what was to go back into boxes. So there was a lot that hasnt been looked at since.

My studio manager and I started brainstorming on strategies to get the work out there again, and we decided that the best way would be to make something to put up on my website.

So we took a new intern to the studiowho happened to be a production whizzand had him organize and digitize everything. I gave him some guidance and checked in with him often on we had had discovered on that particular day, but for the most part gave him free reign as to what could be explored and organized.

Based on what I was witnessing on the streets, I knew that I needed to record what I was experiencing in ways that just couldnt be done with the camera alone. I have, since the beginning of my career, used text, video, audio, Polaroids, found objects, and ephemera. With Raised by Wolves it was my first attempt to incorporate all these various approaches into one project.

Raised by Wolves,video by Jim Goldberg

The children in Raised by Wolves were living hard liveslives that were leading to nowhere. So now, when I reheard a recording that the intern (Brandon) had found in some box, and I heard the voice of lets say Tweeky Dave, well that added something that would extend to the viewers experience of the project.

Its always good to find things that you havent found before. Im not doing it because I have nothing else to do or because Im old and I may as well go back into my archive. Im going back into my archive with purposeto see what I can reinvent. Im still vibrant and making new work. directory submission . The making of the new work guides how the old work looks.

Beyond Rich and Poor and Raised by Wolves, Goldberg is revisiting and re-imagining other projects from his archive. A previously unpublished series titled Coming and Going is being reworked as a series of Japanese small books. Goldberg is also reevaluating and reworking Open See, the project for which he was given the Henri Cartier-Bresson Award in 2007 and the Duestche Borse Award in 2011. Goldberg plans a new edition that will be more expansive than the original, one that will further explain the complexities of the situationof immigration, being a refugee and being trafficked in a place and time. Working roughs for the proposed book and multimedia sketches for the project again are available online. Goldberg says of his process Its always good to find things that you havent found before and Im going back into my archive with purposeto see what I can reinvent. Im still vibrant and making new work. The making of the new work guides how the old work looks.

Photographer/Artist Jim Goldberg is a member of Magnum Photos and Professor of Art at the California College of Arts and Crafts. He Lives in San Francisco.

The Big Picture at the Santa Fe Workshops

Just a reminder that I will be teaching next month at the Santa Fe Workshops, an organization that is known for excellence in photographic workshops. From March 7 – 10th, I will be teaching a 4 day workshop titled, The Big Picture. My goal is to have students leave filled up with new ideas and ways to make imagery, a focused vision for how to get work into the fine art market, and ways to bring a new level of professionalism to their presentations.

“Making great photographs is sometimes only half the journey. directory submission . Getting them seen, and seen in the right context, is often the final leg. Photographers interested in exploring fine-art photography on a professional level need to understand the landscape of the fine-art community.

This four-day workshop explores not only genres and new approaches in contemporary image making, but also how to present your work to the fine-art and documentary markets. Aline has crafted The Big Picture to help you find your voice and discover how to package your work, and yourself, in a professional manner.

We begin by honing our portfolios with reviews, and learning how to set goals. We construct resumes, bios, and personal statements that explain and enhance our work. Photographic assignments round out the workshop experience. While Alines assignments take into account the many colorful backdrops afforded by Santa Fe, they are also designed to challenge you to explore new ways of seeing the world.

Come unlock new energies, and learn how best to share your vision and creativity with others. Be prepared for a workshop filled with inspiration, fun and self-discovery!”

Hope to see you there!

The Big Picture at the Santa Fe Workshops

Just a reminder that I will be teaching next month at the Santa Fe Workshops, an organization that is known for excellence in photographic workshops. From March 7 – 10th, I will be teaching a 4 day workshop titled, The Big Picture. My goal is to have students leave filled up with new ideas and ways to make imagery, a focused vision for how to get work into the fine art market, and ways to bring a new level of professionalism to their presentations.

“Making great photographs is sometimes only half the journey. Getting them seen, and seen in the right context, is often the final leg. Photographers interested in exploring fine-art photography on a professional level need to understand the landscape of the fine-art community.

This four-day workshop explores not only genres and new approaches in contemporary image making, but also how to present your work to the fine-art and documentary markets. Aline has crafted The Big Picture to help you find your voice and discover how to package your work, and yourself, in a professional manner.

We begin by honing our portfolios with reviews, and learning how to set goals. We construct resumes, bios, and personal statements that explain and enhance our work. Photographic assignments round out the workshop experience. article writing submission . While Alines assignments take into account the many colorful backdrops afforded by Santa Fe, they are also designed to challenge you to explore new ways of seeing the world.

Come unlock new energies, and learn how best to share your vision and creativity with others. Be prepared for a workshop filled with inspiration, fun and self-discovery!”

Hope to see you there!

The Big Picture at the Santa Fe Workshops

I apologize in advance for using the Lenscratch platform to share this news, but I am very excited to be asked to teach at the Santa Fe Workshops, an organization that is known for excellence in photographic workshops. This coming March 7 – 10th, I will be teaching a 4 day workshop titled, The Big Picture. My goal is to have students leave filled up with new ideas and ways to make imagery, a focused vision for how to get work into the fine art market, and ways to bring a new level of professionalism to their presentations.

“Making great photographs is sometimes only half the journey. Getting them seen, and seen in the right context, is often the final leg. Photographers interested in exploring fine-art photography on a professional level need to understand the landscape of the fine-art community.

This four-day workshop explores not only genres and new approaches in contemporary image making, but also how to present your work to the fine-art and documentary markets. Aline has crafted The Big Picture to help you find your voice and discover how to package your work, and yourself, in a professional manner.

We begin by honing our portfolios with reviews, and learning how to set goals. We construct resumes, bios, and personal statements that explain and enhance our work. Photographic assignments round out the workshop experience. While Alines assignments take into account the many colorful backdrops afforded by Santa Fe, they are also designed to challenge you to explore new ways of seeing the world.

Come unlock new energies, and learn how best to share your vision and creativity with others. Macys Promo Code . Be prepared for a workshop filled with inspiration, fun and self-discovery!”

If you register before January 1st, they will wave the $45 registration fee.

Hope to see you there!

Photographer #362: Araminta de Clermont

Araminta de Clermont, 1971, UK, is a documentary photographer who has created several bodies of work in South-Africa. In her series Before Life she portrayed girls on the Cape Flats, an area full of problems as poverty, crime, teenage pregnancies, drug addiction and gangs. The girls are all dressed up for their Matric Dance, a South African tradition for graduating 12th grade. These girls are often the first matriculants of their family, having been disadvantaged by the apartheid era. In Life After she focused on the tattoos and lives of South-Africa’s prison gangs after having been released into society. The men have often been imprisoned for many years, if not decades. The tattoo’s, forbidden in the prison system, show life stories, hierarchy, testimonies and personal statements. Araminta has worked a lot for the life style section of The Sunday Times in South Africa and has exhibited her work in a few solo and several group exhibitions. The following images come from the series Before Life, Life After and A new Beginning.

Website: www.aramintadeclermont.com

Photographer #362: Araminta de Clermont

Araminta de Clermont, 1971, UK, is a documentary photographer who has created several bodies of work in South-Africa. In her series Before Life she portrayed girls on the Cape Flats, an area full of problems as poverty, crime, teenage pregnancies, drug addiction and gangs. The girls are all dressed up for their Matric Dance, a South African tradition for graduating 12th grade. These girls are often the first matriculants of their family, having been disadvantaged by the apartheid era. In Life After she focused on the tattoos and lives of South-Africa’s prison gangs after having been released into society. The men have often been imprisoned for many years, if not decades. The tattoo’s, forbidden in the prison system, show life stories, hierarchy, testimonies and personal statements. Araminta has worked a lot for the life style section of The Sunday Times in South Africa and has exhibited her work in a few solo and several group exhibitions. The following images come from the series Before Life, Life After and A new Beginning.

Website: www.aramintadeclermont.com

Zoran Milosavljevic

Los Angeles photographer, Zoran Milosavljevic, really knows his hometown. Literally, block by block. He has completed a seven year series, The Wilshire Project, exploring a city and it’s inhabitants using a sixteen mile boulevard as it’s axis. Zoran is primarily a street photographer capturing the urban environment. After attending the San Francisco Art Institute for photography and the American Film Institute for cinematography, he has traveled the globe documenting street life in a variety of countries. For this project, he stayed close to home.

The Wilshire Project:
Wilshire Boulevard runs almost sixteen miles—roughly the length of Manhattan—from the skyscrapers in downtown Los Angeles to the ocean in Santa Monica. It cuts its way through communities that make up the cityʼs very heart. Some names every local knows, and others carry fame worldwide—MacArthur Park; Korea Town; Hancock Park; the Miracle Mile; Beverly Hills. Along its one hundred ninety-five blocks, the pedestrian encounters every kind of person, every nationality, every architectural style, every kind of business, every kind of landmark that has come to typify the City of Angels. In short, Wilshire Boulevard is Los Angeles.

West Los Angeles

I gave myself simple rules. Every corner would be represented, documented by a street sign. I only took photographs of people I encountered on the street. They determined the locations, not landmarks, remarkable architecture, or great views. I wanted to document the living city, not its buildings.

I had no preparatory questions and set no requirements, except that they were on Wilshire Boulevard and willing to pose for roughly six exposures. I asked people to look at the camera, but gave no other directions. Their poses remain their own, personal statements of those individuals in those particular times at those specific places.

Beverly Hills, Los Angeles

I think when you take a picture of someone that way, itʼs a kind of test for them. They have an opportunity. It is a chance to answer the question: How do you want to be remembered? At this time, in this place? Itʼs up to you. Some took the opportunity to promote themselves. Others struggled to hide their emotions and themselves. I had no interest in taking flattering, or unflattering, shots. I wanted to show people as they wanted to present themselves.

Mid Wilshire, Los Angeles

I did not ask people for their stories, but many gave them anyway. There was the man just released from prison. A woman studying law; a man selling Bibles who made me promise to read the scriptures; aspiring actors and musicians; homeless people expressing quiet dignity; and tourists exploring the city in the most unorthodox way, by walking. And on Wilshire and Ocean, the final block, I photographed a friend who in a city of 3.8 million people, just happened to be passing by.

Downtown Los Angeles

The result captures an essence unique to a city so often simplified, stereotyped, and misrepresented. Ultimately, the Wilshire Project makes tangible the diversity, complexity, and simple basic humanity inherent to Los Angeles.