Tag Archives: Personal Projects

"In and Out of Fashion" photography by Viviane Sassen

sassen-mimi.jpg

Mimi © Viviane Sassen

Awkward twisting arms, legs and intertwined torsos…

Sharp shadows leaping over limbs and faces from outside the frame…

Riots of entangled shapes, forms, patterns, intense colors and textures…

Visually delightful and disorienting — Viviane Sassen’s fun, personal, quirky and artful approach has injected vibrant new energy and life into fashion photography as well as her equally wonderful tangential personal projects.

A 300-piece mid-career retrospective at Huis Marseille in Amsterdam, “Viviane Sassen: In and Out of Fashion”, highlights a giddy range of outrageously great photographs and personal outtakes from the scenes of fashion photo shoots.

Lens Culture has a preview of the exhibition, which opens December 15. Be sure to check out the high-resolution slideshow.

sassen_2.jpg

POP © Viviane Sassen

in-bloom-viviane-sassen-dazed-digital-11_large.jpg

In Bloom, for Dazed Digital © Viviane Sassen

More details about the exhibition (in Dutch and English), including a wonderful series of interviews with models, art directors, fashion designers, and other collaborators: Huis Marseille website.

Andrew Meredith, Hong Kong Island

Andrew Meredith, Hong Kong Island

Andrew Meredith

Hong Kong Island,
China, 2012
Website – MeredithPhoto.com

Andrew Meredith graduated from Falmouth College of Arts and has, for the past decade, been shooting commercial, editorial and personal projects. In 2008 his personal work was awarded as a category winner in the Creative Review Photography Annual and following up in 2009 receiving the Best In Book award for his Slaughtermen series, depicting the brutal and gory world of the abattoir worker. In the same year Andrew was awarded category winner for his Model Village series. His first solo exhibition, Excursions, images of south american wanderings, was shown in London in 2010 at Riverside Studios and then during the Photomonth festival at Truman Brewery Gallery. In 2011 Andrew was commissioned by Icon magazine to document the Steilneset Witch Memorial by Peter Zumthor in the most northerly town in mainland Eurpoe, Vardo, Norway, deep into the arctic circle. His work has been published worldwide. He lives and works in London.
 

Andrew Newson, Seaford

Andrew Newson, Seaford

Andrew Newson

Seaford,
East Sussex, United Kingdom, 2010
From the Portraits series
Website – AndrewNewson.com

Andrew Newson spent some years as a commercial photographer before starting a photography training business in 2008. Developing interesting ways to inspire others and develop their craft is at the core of what he does. Andrew's personal projects range from exploring local landscapes over prolonged periods of time to give a further understanding of the land and our place within it. Andrew also works in more spontaneous ways creating images in everyday situations than ask questions of the viewer.

Andrew Meredith, Oslo, Norway

Andrew Meredith, Oslo, Norway

Andrew Meredith

Oslo, Norway,
, 2010
Website – MeredithPhoto.com

Andrew Meredith graduated from Falmouth College of Arts and has, for the past decade, been shooting commercial, editorial and personal projects. In 2008 his personal work was awarded as a category winner in the Creative Review Photography Annual and following up in 2009 receiving the Best In Book award for his Slaughtermen series, depicting the brutal and gory world of the abattoir worker. In the same year Andrew was awarded category winner for his Model Village series. His first solo exhibition, Excursions, images of south american wanderings, was shown in London in 2010 at Riverside Studios and then during the Photomonth festival at Truman Brewery Gallery. In 2011 Andrew was commissioned by Icon magazine to document the Steilneset Witch Memorial by Peter Zumthor in the most northerly town in mainland Eurpoe, Vardo, Norway, deep into the arctic circle. His work has been published worldwide. He lives and works in London.
 

Review Santa Fe: Cristina De Middel

Over the next month, I will be sharing some of the photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  

Cristina De Middel’s amazing series, The Afronauts, has been on my radar for awhile.  The first time I saw the series, it took my breath away with its originality and subject matter.  The buzz at Review Santa Fe was not just about the work, but about the amazing book that accompanied it.  Unfortunately, the book is sold out, but it’s a sign that we need to be first in line for her next offering.
Cristina De Middel is a documentary photographer and artist now
based in London that has been working as a photojournalist for different
newspapers in Spain (and with NGO´s such as Doctors Without Borders or
the Spanish Red Cross) for almost 10 years . She combines her strictly
documentary assignments , which has been exhibited and awarded in
several occasions (including a National Photojournalism Award Juan
Cancelo  and a special mention at the New Fnac Photographic Talent ),
with more personal projects . This B-side of Cristina´s work 
deliberately  asks the audience to question the language and the
veracity of photography  as a document and plays with reconstructions 
or archetypes that blur the border between reality and fiction. She received her MA in Fine Arts at the Universitat Politécnica de Valencia, Spain, her MA in Photography at the University of Oklahoma, a postgraduate degree in Photojournalism at the Barcelona Autónoma University, Spain and spent time in IV War Correspondents Training in Madrid Spain.

Images from the Afronauts book

Images from The Afronauts

 The AfronautsIn 1964, still leaving the dream of their recently gained independence, Zambia started a space program that would put the first African on the moon catching up  the USA and the Soviet Union in the space race.

 Only a few  optimists supported the project by Edward Makuka, the school teacher in charge of presenting the ambitious program and getting its necessary funding. But the financial aid never came, as the United Nations declined their support, and one of the astronauts , a 16 year old girl, got pregnant and had to quit.

 That is how the heroic initiative turned into an exotic episode of the African history, surrounded by wars, violence, droughts and hunger.

As a photojournalist I have always been attracted by the eccentric lines of story-telling avoiding the same old subjects told in the same old ways.
Now , with my personal projects,  I respect the basis of the truth but allow myself to break the rules of veracity trying to push the audience into analyzing the patterns of the stories we consume as real.

 “Afronauts” is based on the documentation of an impossible dream that only lives in the pictures.

 I start from a real fact that took place 50 years ago and rebuild the documents adapting them to my personal imagery .

Kirk Crippens

It is rare to gain access to a world behind bars, but photographer Kirk Crippens achieved that task in 2008, and since then, he has been granted one hour with the prisoners on an annual basis.  That access has resulted in the project, Hidden Population, a series of portraits on San Quentin inmates.
Kirk is one of the most prolific photographers making work today, and one of the most generous.  Much of his work explores The Great Recession, with projects that look at foreclosure, job loss, and the collapse of auto dealerships. Kirk had an early start with photography, inspired by
his grandfather who kept a darkroom in his closet. In college, he
ventured into photojournalism, interning at prestigious newspapers around the
US. Based in San Francisco since 2000 he focused his efforts on personal
projects. He has exhibited widely in solo and group shows,  he was  named Top 50 Photographer in Photolucida’s Critical Mass in 2010 and 2011, nominated for the 2011–2013 Eureka Fellowship Program, nominated for Photolucida’s book prize, and exhibited in the
International Photography Festival in Lishui, China. He is currently the artist
in residence at RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco and 2013 he will be the Artist in Residence at Newspace
Center for Photography in Portland, Oregon.
Images from Hidden Population

I was in the midst of a long process of photographing portraits inside San Quentin in May 2011 when the Supreme Court declared the overcrowding in California’s prison system unconstitutional and ordered the population lowered by 133,000 to achieve 137.5% capacity. My project began in 2008, when I petitioned the prison to allow me inside with my cameras. A year and a half later I was granted limited access and began a series of brief one-hour visits with the men. I was allowed inside once a year between 2009-12.

When I first arrived at San Quentin with my cameras, the prisoners were seated facing one another in a circle of metal chairs arranged for a gardening class. Fluorescent lights reflected off the tile floor onto their faces. The warden was present and guards were scattered throughout the room. I was given 45 minutes. Rushed and constricted, I struggled to find resonance. A man with a hand-sewn cap caught my attention, and I isolated him in my viewfinder. As I took in the scene, it occurred to me that I could capture individual qualities of the men from behind while they were participating in the class. By approaching it this way, I could also reference the hidden aspect of the lives they lead, locked up inside the prison.

When invited back in January 2012, I decided to try a different approach that included bringing a tripod and directly asking the men to pose for me. I set up my tripod in front of a cinder block wall in the San Quentin cafeteria and began asking the men if I could take their portrait. Most seemed honored; a few declined. It wasn’t how the guards or warden expected me to work, and I could feel the tension. The guards whispered and huddled together in the corner. Less than an hour later they asked me to leave and ushered me out. Although the series I’m submitting feels complete, I continue to be interested in prison culture and the political issues affecting it. I hope to visit again.

Tina Hillier, Melinda

Tina Hillier, Melinda

Tina Hillier

Melinda,
Turku, Finland, 2011
Website – TinaHillier.com

Tina Hillier studied Photography at The Arts Institute at Bournemouth. She exhibits regularly in group shows and has twice been selected for The National Portrait Gallery, Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize Exhibition in 2010 and 2011. She lives in London, working on editorial, commercial and personal projects. 
 

Zed Nelson, Untitled

Zed Nelson, Untitled

Zed Nelson

Untitled,
, 2012
From the Hackney – A Tale of Two Cities series
Website – ZedNelson.com

Born in East Africa, Zed Nelson graduated from Westminster University, London, with a degree in photography and filmmaking. Having gained international recognition and numerous awards as a documentary photographer, Nelson’s recent work adopts an increasingly considered, in-depth approach to reflect on contemporary social issues through long-term personal projects. Nelson’s seminal book Gun Nation – a disturbing reflection on America's deadly love affair with the gun – was published in twelve countries and awarded five major international photography prizes. Love Me, Nelson’s second book, reflects on the cultural and commercial forces that drive a global obsession with youth and beauty. The project was recently nominated for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize. Nelson’s latest project Hackney – A Tale of Two Cities explores the London borough that he has lived for most of his life. Nelson’s work has been exhibited at Tate Britain, the ICA and the National Portrait Gallery, and is in the permanent collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum.