Tag Archives: Periphery

VIDEO PLAYLIST: Talk American

Video%20Playlist%20image.jpg
Stephanie Barber, Still from Dogs, 2000, Image courtesy of the artist


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | 6:00pm | MoCPVideo Playlist is a recurring series of one-night public video screenings guest curated in response to MoCP exhibitions. squido lense . Fotografia . Jesse Malmed will present a program in conjunction with Peripheral Views that includes a live, participatory performance during the screening.Talk barely, talk breathily, talk American. Fotografia . The works in this screening address the complexity of language and the myriad ways it shapes our experience of reality. Any place as big as America, with as many voices as America, has a multitude of expressions that exist at the periphery. This program brings the following to a center: a Sci-Fi CAPTCHA tale, what Microsoft Word found wrong with the Unabomber, how jargon becomes gibberish, a report from the out-of-bodied, a political speech about political speech, and finally, real talk from a pair of paper-mache dogs. Following the screening, Malmed will present selections from The Body Electronic, an ongoing and evolving series of participatory video-based performances. Malmed offers a visual, polyvocal, and interactive experience that engages audience members in dizzying, surprising, and humorous ways.The screening features the work of Joe Sandler, Peter Rose, Peggy Ahwesh, Doug Hall, Gabrielle De Vietri, Stephanie Barber, and Jesse Malmed.This event is free and open to the public.


Filter%20Banner%20BlogMoCP | 600 S. Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]

VIDEO PLAYLIST: Talk American

Video%20Playlist%20image.jpg
Stephanie Barber, Still from Dogs, 2000, Image courtesy of the artist


Wednesday, September 12, 2012 | 6:00pm | MoCPVideo Playlist is a recurring series of one-night public video screenings guest curated in response to MoCP exhibitions. Jesse Malmed will present a program in conjunction with Peripheral Views that includes a live, participatory performance during the screening.Talk barely, talk breathily, talk American. The works in this screening address the complexity of language and the myriad ways it shapes our experience of reality. Any place as big as America, with as many voices as America, has a multitude of expressions that exist at the periphery. directory submission . This program brings the following to a center: a Sci-Fi CAPTCHA tale, what Microsoft Word found wrong with the Unabomber, how jargon becomes gibberish, a report from the out-of-bodied, a political speech about political speech, and finally, real talk from a pair of paper-mache dogs. link pyramid . Following the screening, Malmed will present selections from The Body Electronic, an ongoing and evolving series of participatory video-based performances. Malmed offers a visual, polyvocal, and interactive experience that engages audience members in dizzying, surprising, and humorous ways.The screening features the work of Joe Sandler, Peter Rose, Peggy Ahwesh, Doug Hall, Gabrielle De Vietri, Stephanie Barber, and Jesse Malmed.This event is free and open to the public.


Filter%20Banner%20BlogMoCP | 600 S. carrera de fotografia . Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]

Andi Schreiber

Andi Schreiber is what one might coin as a domestic Martin Parr. She turns her camera on her life, her children, family and friends with a glaring lens that is full of color, reality, and the details of our humanness. There is humor and pathos in her seeing, and her skills as a photojournalist bring domestic life into sharp focus.

Andi graduated from the University of Michigan with a BFA and was a photojournalist in Boston Before moving New York City to work as a magazine and newspaper picture editor. In 2002, she traded in city life for suburbia and lives in Westchester County, New York, with her husband and sons.  Recently Andi’s work was featured in the Kiernan Gallery’s exhibition, Family Dynamics, and she was an award recipient in PHOTO/arts Magazine’s book and online exhibition, My Own Wilderness.

In 2010 and 2011, Andi’s books Lush Light and WonderLust were each awarded Honorable Mention in Blurb’s Photography Book Now competition.

WonderLust is a visceral response to my immediate surroundings – a world where I’m at home yet hovering on the periphery, an insider and outsider at once. Through these images I find my place within my family’s framework and that of a larger existence.

A sense of wonder and thrill of attraction is at the core of this project. These photographs are made at home, at poolside, at parties and in parking lots, of family and friends, and people unknown to me. They are pieces of my world and a manifestation of inner life. I fight the urge to pre-visualize; my process is random. I’m struck by the accidental image: a flash of color, a passing gesture. Details make me tingle. I need to experience deeply what is here, right now. The camera enables me to vanish into moments before they are gone.
This ongoing body of work, WonderLust, embraces sensation and a passion for what’s unseen. It’s as if I have no choice but to turn that irresistible desire into something tangible, into a photograph. I want to seduce the viewer to feel as I do – to know pleasure, to be alive.

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/detail/2300393

Aline Smithson: Converging Conversations

Sharing a work-in-progress series titled, Converging Conversations. I tend to make work that tells stories, but I have been also shooting images that are non-specific, more about color or gesture or emotion–I have been thinking about those moments when you are lost in thought, yet not really thinking about anything…

Converging Conversations is a series about juxtaposing unrelated images in order to create a new conversation or narrative. It is a conversation that is a convergence of ideas and associations, open to personal interpretation. The result is something completely separate from the original intent of the image making.

My initial focus in creating many of these photographs was to capture a sense of disconnectedness, a sense of day dreaming, and in some cases, a sense of nothingness–images that capture moments or gestures, moving back and forth between a place that is tangible and a place on the periphery of my memory and experience. By combining these images, a new narrative begins and the photographs become animated in conversation.

A Photographic Scavenger Hunt: Conversation with John Cyr

John Cyr is a Brooklyn-based photographer, master printer, and a graduate from SVA’s Photography MFA program. He began the Developer Tray series as his thesis project and has spent nearly two years shooting photographers’ developing trays all around the US. I spoke to John now that his project is nearing completion.

Picture 1 of 10

Mark Cohen’s Developer Tray. Photograph by John Cyr.

Paula Kupfer: Have you finished the project? And did you photograph sixty trays as you set out to do?

John Cyr: I’m definitely in the final stages, and past the sixty—I’m at sixty-five now. I have only a few more appointments set up. I’m very comfortable where the collection is. Now I’m figuring out how to take it into book form, and how much of the personal experience to include.

PK: It’s a fascinating part of the project.

JC: I get that a lot. People’s interest is piqued when they find out, for instance, that I went to Sally Mann’s farm and actually photographed the tray there.

PK: In this context, the photograph is the result of a long process, and there’s some mystery to it. Did you meet many of the photographers?

JC: There are a few that I never met, where l just dealt with their assistants. Others were mailed to me. But for at least eighty percent, I visited in person. Some were ten-minute talks; others, two-hour conversations. For instance, I had a great day with Larry Fink. I spent the day out on his farm, and stayed for dinner. He had peacocks running around, and an emu.

PK: You weren’t tempted to photograph the periphery—their houses or surroundings, or the photographers themselves?

JC: I only photographed with my cellphone. With every photographer that I approached, I made sure to be overly humble and gracious. I think that a lot of the reasons that well-known photographers accepted to participate was because it wasn’t so personal. Photographically, maybe. But I didn’t say, “I’d love to take a portrait of you while I’m there.”

I wanted to respect their privacy and not be aggressive. But I regret not recording anything while I was there, especially now, as I’m going back and trying to put the pieces together. I have notes, which are good, and I have my memory, but there’s a lot that’s lost in time.

PK: Do you consider this a greater reflection of the project? It deals with nostalgia and the past, and something that’s being lost…

JC: Yeah, that’s interesting, and a good way of putting it. This is what I’m trying to bring together for the book – the experience, the fleeting moments, the experience of going and meeting with these photographers.

PK: Do you think of the project as an archive?

JC: I do. And, as far as the archive goes, it almost heightens the fact that each of these objects is so physically beautiful—because of the colors, but also because it’s a picture of this object that has literally experienced the hands of the artist.

Personally, this project has the greatest sense of purpose within the history of photography, and the current state that we’re in. Not necessarily for representing a longing for silver printing, because it hasn’t disappeared, but just shifting from being almost the standard to being almost nonexistent.

PK: How do you relate this project to the rest of your work?

JC: I’m trying to figure that out. I’m interested in continuing to work on the idea of analogue photography. This project deals with the analogue process but they’re not analogue prints. I really want to get back into the darkroom with my own work. How it’s going to manifest itself, I don’t know yet.

I’m still happy about my previous, documentary work, but it was difficult to separate myself out from other work that people do at any given place/time. I think that this project has taken off so well because of its iconic imagery. If you see one tray, you remember the project. How I can possibly bring that to another body of work, I’m still figuring out. I don’t want to find myself falling into a trap of doing just that—isolating an object in the same way, showcasing it for the sake of its own personal history. I could go photograph typewriters of well-known writers, or recording instrument of old analog studios—it’s never-ending. But I don’t want to do that. I know that this was a shift from my previous work, and where it will go next, I don’t know yet. But it’s going to be different.

To learn more about John Cyr’s work, visit his website www.johncyrphotography.com.

Paula Kupfer is the editorial and circulation coordinator for Aperture magazine.


TIME Picks the Most Surprising Photos of 2011

The year 2011 brought us dramatic and unexpected images from some of the world’s major news events, including the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan, the violent end of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi’s rule and the humiliating tweet that ruined New York Representative Anthony Weiner’s career. But beyond the widely seen and iconic images that accompanied the year’s biggest events, like the death of Osama bin Laden and the shooting of Arizona Representative Gabrielle Giffords, were unusual, equally astonishing and startling images that rested at the periphery of the news. A cat with two faces, rail tracks buckled by the shifting earth after a quake in New Zealand, the police rescue of a girl held hostage by her father, a suicidal bride and beautiful, abstract images taken from space by an astronaut photographer — these are just a few of the compelling and surprising images to have emerged beyond the main news cycle this year. Here, LightBox looks back at a small selection of the underreported, improbable and astounding images that caught the attention of TIME’s photo editors.

New Work: Riverbank | Barranca

I’ve posted a new series on my website. It’s called Riverbank or Barranca, in Spanish.

Buenos Aires is situated along the Rio de la Plata. A small river embankment is the only topographical feature in an otherwise very flat city. I started photographing there because I wanted to make photos with vistas and elevation changes and there was no where else to go. Ironically, you can’t actually see the river from any point on the riverbank. Too much land has been reclaimed.

The photos in the work are ordered geographically, proceeding from north to south, essentially giving a tour of the city. As I started photographing the project, often at dawn or dusk, I began to notice traces of the Argentina’s history present in the cityscape. At a certain point I realized that the work is as much about politics [and economics] as it is about landscape.

Avenida General Paz

In the first photo, for instance, police randomly search cars as they cross the city limits. The city and suburbs are two different administrative entities, with different police forces. In an inversion of the typical North American urban model, in South America, poverty and crime are often concentrated on the periphery of the city. The checkpoints are a theatrical effort to calm the the city’s relatively wealthier residents.

National Library

Argentina’s national library is constructed on the grounds of a former 19th century mansion that was used as the residence of Juan Perón and which was then demolished following his ouster by the military in 1955. Designed in 1961 in a brutalist style by one of the country’s most prominent architects, it wasn’t completed until 1992, due to drastic changes in government and shortages in funding, particularly during the 1980s debt crisis.

Shell station below Autopista Arturo Illia

Argentina hosted the World Cup in 1978. It was accompanied by a massive public works effort by the then-military government that saw the construction of elevated highways across the city. Such works were often funded with loans from the World Bank as well as New York financial institutions flush with petro-dollars.

Malvinas/Falklands war monument

Plaza San Martin is the site of a monument honoring Argentine soldiers killed in the 1982 conflict over the Falkland [Malvinas] Islands. The war killed about 650 Argentine soldiers and about 250 British. Argentina was unsuccessful in asserting its territorial claim over the islands.

Economy Ministry with bullet holes

In 1955, Argentina’s air force dropped bombs on the Plaza de Mayo, the country’s principal square and home to the seat of government, in an effort to unseat the elected president, Juan Perón. About 300 people were killed and the façade of the Economy ministry still bears the scars from the bombardment.

Paseo Colon & Alsina

The graffiti which reads “Nestor Vive” refers to the deceased ex-president, Nestor Kirchner, who was president from 2003 to 2007, a time in which Argentina was recovering from a severe economic crisis in 2001. His wife, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, is the current president, having been recently reelected to a second term.

The other graffiti, “Macri = Facho” refers to Mauricio Macri, who is the mayor of Buenos Aires and a member of the opposition. ‘Facho’ is a local slang word meaning ‘fascist.’

Club Atlético

The military junta that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1983 murdered about 30,000 of its own citizens. Various buildings were used as interrogation and torture centers prior to shooting the victims or tossing them out of airplanes. This area, at the intersection of Avenida San Juan and Paseo Colón, was one such center. It was known as Club Atlético although it was subsequently demolished to make way for one of the aforementioned elevated highways.

At first, it wasn’t my intention to take photos with so much politics and history in them. The thing is, these traces are present in an area that has had so much history pass through it, or happen upon it.

Granted, I’m cherry-picking the photos from the series with heavier subtexts. At this point I’m still wondering how to incorporate all this context into the work itself. I’m not a huge fan of long captions but I think that this background information is important to understanding the photos.

Tim Hyde

I featured Tim Hyde’s terrific series, Repossession, a couple of years ago, and I recently found myself wanting to revisit his site and see what he’s been up to. Tim has continued with this project looking at natural disasters–floods, hurricanes, earthquakes–with an interesting perspective. It’s a perspective that the reaction of Mother Nature, in what could be a response to our mistreatment of our planet, is to reclaim and take back what was hers, and that mass destruction is part of the cycle of life. Since I last looked at his work, he has visited Haiti, Japan, and many more states where natural disasters have occurred.

Tim was raised in the Midwest, has lived in Oregon, Texas, Delaware, North Carolina, and in Washington, DC, for many years. He careers include tours of duty as a logger, teacher, free-lance writer, filmmaker, legilative aide, political hack, corporate executive, and public-affairs consultant. And, he makes pictures. His work has been featured in Fraction Magazine, featured on the NY Times LENS blog, and he continues to exhibit around the U.S.

Repossession: From the beginning, from our earliest tribal memories, there was a struggle between man and nature. This battle is the wellspring of myth and legend and our most fundamental rituals. Each society, each generation, addresses it anew. Sometimes man is placed at the periphery of this cosmic struggle, like Greek mortals, and sometimes man is central. But these foundational discussions are always more about man than nature, about how we organize ourselves and how we view the universe.

Today, in the West, many believe humans are finally winning the conflct and will soon conquer the planet; they use words such as rape and pillage, metaphors of route. These assertions are just another form of human arrogance.

It is self-evident that nature will prevail in the end. Events such as floods and earthquakes are dramatic demonstrations of the planet’s redemptive powers. Mother earth—nature—is relentless. She is patient, but in the end she cleanses herself of man’s works, utterly, without pity or remorse.

And yet, nature does so with whimsy sometimes. She rearranges in colorful and symmetrical patterns. There is a certain sad but also uplifting beauty in these catastrophes and erosions, the spectacle of reclamation. That is what I am trying to capture.

These photographs are part of an ongoing project on nature’s preeminence. These photographs were taken between 2008 and 2011 in eastern Iowa, Louisiana, Texas, North Dakota, Italy, Haiti, Iceland, and Japan.