Tag Archives: Paul Getty Museum

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Donna J. Wan, At the Air Strip

Donna J. Wan, At the Air Strip

Donna J. Wan

At the Air Strip,
, 2012
From the In The Landscape series
Website – DonnaJWan.com

Donna J. Wan is a San Francisco Bay Area artist. She received her BA from Stanford and her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has been shown at Gallery 1401 at the University of Arts, New Mexico Museum of Art, Klompching Gallery, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. She was named a Magenta Foundation Flash Forward 2007 Emerging Photographer and, most recently, received an Honorable Mention award for Review Santa Fe's Project Launch category and the APA/Lucie Foundation Scholarship grant. Her work has been published in Fraction Magazine, Lenscratch, Time Out Chicago, Profifoto, and the Conscientious website by Joerg Colberg and written about by W.M. Hunt and Virginia Heckert of the J. Paul Getty Museum. In 2009, she was an artist-in-residence at The Center for Photography at Woodstock and was invited by Catherine Opie to lecture at UCLA. Collectors of her work include the Pulitzer-Prize winning author Richard Ford and Thomas Kellner." 

Shen Wei, Self-portrait (Juniper)

Shen Wei, Self-portrait (Juniper)

Shen Wei

Self-portrait (Juniper),
, 2012
From the I Miss You Already series
Website – ShenPhoto.com

Born and raised in Shanghai, Shen Wei is a fine art photographer currently based in New York City. His work have been exhibited nationally and internationally, with venues including the Museum of the City of New York, Southeast Museum of Photography, Lincoln Center Avery Fisher Hall, the Harn Museum of Art and the CAFA Art Museum in Beijing. His photographs have been featured in publications such as The New Yorker, Aperture, ARTnews, PDN, American Photo, and Chinese Photography. Shen Wei's work is included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Philadelphia Museum of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Museum of Fine Arts St. Petersburg, Library of Congress, Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Museum of Chinese in America, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and Kinsey Institute. He holds an MFA in photography, video, and related media from the School of Visual Arts, New York; a BFA in photography from Minneapolis College of Art and Design; and an AA in decorative arts from Shanghai Light Industry College.

Revisiting the Mastery of Mexican Photographer Manuel Álvarez Bravo

Often cited as Mexico’s most celebrated fine art photographer, Manuel lvarez Bravo, whose life almost spanned the entire 20th century, relentlessly captured the history of the country’s evolving social and geopolitical atmosphere.A Photographer on the Watch, a new show organized by the Jeu de Paume in Paris, features previously unpublished and unseen images from the master alongside lvarez Bravo’s most recognizable images, such as The Daughter of the Dancers (slide 6) and The Crouched Ones (slide 9).Together, they bring new attention and reconsideration of the work of the photographerwho died in 2002whose prolific output has not only been thoroughly scrutinized by critics, but also published in more than a hundred books and exhibited internationally (The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles staged a major retrospective in 2001).

After the Mexican Revolution that began in 1910, lvarez Bravo’s career emerged during a creative renaissance that was a reaction to the resulting paradigm shift in the political environment. Alongside the major uprisings against then-Mexican president, Porfirio Daz, brought forth by political revolutionaries, such as Emiliano Zapata and Pancho Villa, significant artists including Diego Rivera also came to prominence. backlinks . lvarez Bravo’s work, which evolved during this period, addressed what curators Laura Gonzles Flores and Gerardo Mosquera identify as the country’s “gradual abandonment of rural life and traditional customs, the rise of a post-revolutionary culture with international influences, and the espousal of a modern culture related to the urban maelstrom.”

Perhaps the most noticeable part of lvarez Bravo’s career is his breadth of approaches, coursing through modernism (like Edward Weston, his personal friend) with formalist photographs of abstract paper forms, before moving on to address recognizable motifs. People, things and objectsfor example, a sheep fallen down against a sidewalk curbare shown in real habitats, but captured in a perspective which elevate the purpose and meaning of the photograph, beyond that of pure documentation (like Eugne Atget).

Although considered to be a part of the Surrealist movement, Alvarez Bravo’s images aren’t exclusively Surrealist in its denotative meaning; his lens captured the uncanny and mythic qualities of things that tangibly existed, such as an optical store plastered with eye illustrations, as seen on Optical Parable(slide 10), that evoke the work of pure Surrealists.

lvarez Bravo’s career is one which can be easily seen as a story of tireless work full of laborious attempts and devout experimentationleading to iconic masterpieces. As Gerardo Mosquera states in an essay inside the exhibition’s catalog: “while [Henri] Cartier-Bresson seized the decisive moment, lvarez Bravo laid a trap for decisive momentsa statement which both captures not only lvarez Bravo’s dedication to his practice, but his ability to compose and very purposefully create photographs saturated with poetic complexity.

Manuel lvarez Bravo: A Photographer on the Watchis on view from Oct. 16 through Jan. 20 at Jeu de Paume in Paris. See more info here.

Jesse Rieser

You might call Jesse Reiser a Young Gun, at least the Art Director’s Club said so when they selected him as one of the top 50 Emerging Creatives.  The 2012 Magenta Foundation also felt he should be a Flash Forward Winner, and Communications Arts gave him a nod in the the 2012 Photo Annual.  Plus it doesn’t hurt that he was one of Center’s Review Santa Fe 100 last year and works with clients such as Publicis World Wide, M&C Saatchi, Cramer Krasselt,
the NFL, Ritz Carlton, Warner Brothers, The NBA, Proctor & Gamble, The John
Paul Getty Museum, and ESPN Magazi
ne.

There is a reason for all of this fan fare.  Jesse is a seer and seeker, looking inward and outward at our world and culture, as evidenced by this range of imagery and ability to tell a story:

Jesse has a new project, Wallow Fire, recently showcased atThe Forty Eighthh: Contemporary Photography at Arizona’s Centennial, in Phoenix, Arizona.  Jesse made handmade books to coincide with the project.



Wallow Fire: In Eastern Arizona, near the border with New Mexico, is a land of dirt roads stretching out to white-washed horizons.  Here, ranches are carved out of the scrub- and pine-dotted landscapes and grazing cattle are the only living things for miles.

The area’s beauty comes from its pervasive remoteness.





But from late May to early June in 2011, the land in and surrounding the Bear Wallow Wilderness Area in the White Mountains was remade with a terrible, devastating kind of beauty. One that turned the landscape lunar and the air yellowed and hazy. A campfire sparked a conflagration that charred 841 miles across Arizona and New Mexico, destroying 72 buildings, 32 of them homes.





Driving west from Santa Fe in late May 2011, I saw the Wallow Fire, as it was named, and I was mesmerized by the towering smoke plumes and expanses of blackened earth. I returned a week later for five days to capture the fire, its effects, and the international community of men and women assembled to fight and eventually extinguish the blaze.


I was drawn by the way the Wallow Fire, reshaped the landscape and the atmosphere, making it a surreal, deadly place where playgrounds stood empty, where tree bark turned to ash scales, where grazing land was charred to cinder, where the air swirled thick with smoke and heat. Forcing everyone to evacuate.





Most of my work deals with subjects close to me, familiar in nature and often very personal.  This project was different. Growing up in the Midwest, I had never experienced a forest fire, let alone one as massive and overwhelming as the largest fire in Arizona history. In a sense, I was a tourist, fascinated by everything that unfolded and recording everything I saw. There were no plans, no preconceived notions.

Herb Ritts Retrospective: Naomi Campbell Remembers the Iconic Photographer

The long and legendary supermodel era of the ’90s can be summed up in one gorgeous and distinct photograph: Herb Ritts’ now-iconic shot of Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, Tatjana Patitz and Stephanie Seymour huddled together in the nude.

But the 1989 sitting almost didn’t happen.

As Campbell recalls, Turlington was on a Calvin Klein contract and reportedly wasn’t allowed to participate. “We said, ‘How can you not be in this picture?’” Campbell says. “And she jumped in, and that was it!”

That black-and-white image is just one of nearly 80 photographs on display at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles as part of a new exhibition and book on the photographer. Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, on view through Aug. 12, focuses on the portraits and nudes from Ritts, who documented models, musicians, actresses and other celebrities for magazines such as Interview, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair throughout his career.

“He always had a vision about how he wanted every picture,” Campbell says. “He liked strength in his pictures, and he got you to do things that you never thought you could do. He was very encouraging and would talk to you about a picture first, and slowly get you there to where he wanted. And you’d be amazed that you even could do that. It was always a pleasure working with him. He was a complete gentleman, and I loved every picture he took of me.”

Herb Ritts—© Herb Ritts Foundation

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Campbell first met Ritts in the late ’80s when she was introduced by fellow model Tatitz. She would often stay with him when she visited Los Angeles, and the two later traveled together to South Africa, where Ritts captured the first photograph of the supermodel with former South African president Nelson Mandela. “He was just a really special human being, and someone that I know is dearly missed in fashion—you never see that kind of picture anymore,” Campbell says.

And while many people revere the image of the five supermodels as one of the most famous sittings in fashion photography, Campbell says they had no idea it would become so iconic. “It was just nice for us to be together,” she says. “We rarely get to do pictures together—even to this day—so it was like a catch-up time for us. We got there in the morning, had lunch and then he told us what we were going to do. It was easy—it was always easy with Herb.”

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the book by Paul Martineau is available here.