Tag Archives: Paris Photo

Photo News – Hotshoe magazine for contemporary photography Dec/Jan out now in print and as app

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Featuring: Leigh Ledare testing the boundaries of relationships, sex and love in Double Bind; Alinka Echeverria’s documentary on the birth of South Sudan; Diana Scherer‘s Nurture Studies; Asger Carlsen‘s Hester; and Fleur van Dodewaard in Crude Metaphors. Plus reviews of Alec Soth‘s Looking for Love, 1996, Klein + Moriyama at Tate Modern, and the Nikon D800. As well as, A.D. Coleman’s Letter from New York, a round up of the latest books, exhibition listings, news and more.

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EXCLUSIVE APP CONTENT:
Alan Spearman’s film of the streets of South Memphis ‘As I Am’, Viviane Sassen’s ode to her muse Roxane and a review of this year’s Paris Photo. Plus enriched portfolios, clickable exhibition listings and much, much more.

SPECIAL OFFER:
If you subscribe to Hotshoe International’s print edition during December, we’ll send you a free copy of our Oct-Nov issue as an early Christmas present.

Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers Tagged: Alec Soth, Alinka Echeverria, Asger Carlsen, Diana Scherer, Hotshoe App, Hotshoe App Edition, HotShoe magazine, Leigh Ledare

Archive of Modern Conflict @ Paris Photo 2012

A Cyanotype plant study. The world record parachute jump from 1932. Rooftops in St. Petersberg, Scott’s Terra Nova expedition. A West African king. Cumulus humiliis. An abstract composition. A Kominka dancer. An observatory. Another plant study. These are just a handful of the prints that were showcased in ‘Collected Shadows’ – a stunning exhibition from the Archive of Modern Conflict at this year’s Paris Photo.

Deftly assembled by curator Timothy Prus, the show was a gloriously eclectic jamboree that displayed all manner of photography’s styles, periods and ends. Spanning works from 1850 to the present day by both anonymous and name photographers including Gustave Le Gray, Robert Frank, Bertha Jaques, Josef Sudek and Willi Ruge, and arranged in sections according to themes of earth, fire, air, water and ether, ‘Collected Shadows’ was richly satisfying and undoubtedly the most talked about booth at the fair.

Below is a video interview (produced by The Art Newspaper), the first half of which features Prus discussing how the archive has grown and the ideas behind the installation. It’s a revealing, albeit brief, insight into the quirky mind of the collector known for his penchant for photographic oddities of the past. He is clearly as fascinated by the magic of photography as he is by the mysteries of life. After all, the collecting style is freighted with an acute awareness of the tendency for people to crow over the misery of others and the role images play within that.
The jewel in the crown of the exhibition was the new Bruce Gilden portraits, odd-looking sitters shot mostly on Brick Lane in London, that were hung on the outer wall of the booth. Each photograph was ingeniously paired alongside a historical work such as a wax-paper negative from 1858 showing the garden of a private house in Tehran, for example. Both images on their own were extraordinary, but their combination proved an intoxicating mix.

For those wishing to discover more, the Archive of Modern Conflict has an online shop for its books where you can browse titles from the likes of Stephen Gill and Larry Towell as well as their own fabulous journals. The latest, issue 4, comprises photographs from ‘Collected Shadows’. Check out the slideshow of sample images here.

Grids and cluster presentations of photography at Paris Photo

Amidst the endless sea of photographs hanging on partitioned walls at the Paris Photo fair this week, presentations of clusters and grids of photos seemed to multiply the attraction to some works of art.

Stopping people in their tracks, this approach forces one’s gaze to bounce around the grids, and then to hone in on one image then another, eyes concentrating with intensity, then moving on again and back. squido lense . carrera de fotografia .

Three such grids include a series of self-portraits by Lee Friedlander; jam-packed Japanese commuters in Michael Wolf’s series Tokyo Compression; and a collection of anonymous cheesecake photos selected by Alec Soth and framed in wooden boxes that echo the feeling of the cheap wood paneling one would find in the motel bedrooms where many of these images seem to have been made during furtive affairs.

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Photo News – Mute: The Silence of Dogs by Martin Usborne book signing

How could I resist posting more photos from Martin Usborne’s marvellous book of doggie portraits, Mute: The Silence of Dogs? Especially as the book signing took place this afternoon at at the Kerher Verlag Publishing stand at Paris Photo. Book price: Euros 39.90

All photos © Martin Usborne, The Silence of Dogs

And for four more, read more…


All photos © Martin Usborne, The Silence of Dogs

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Books Tagged: Kerher Verlag Publishing, Martin Usborne, Mute: The Silence of Dogs, Paris Photo, photobook

The Bechers on Display at Paris Photo

The work of the photographic duo Bernd and Hilla Becher is indisputably some of the most important in modern photography. This week, a two-part exhibit at Paris Photo highlights the historical significance of the Bechers, most well known for their “typologies”—uniform, photographic studies of industrial structures such as water towers and blast furnaces.

The first part of the show, Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012, features an extensive collection of rare ephemera related to the Bechers’ work. These objects, including posters, invitations and museum catalogues, were amassed by curator and book dealer Antoine de Beaupré for more than ten years.

“You get an historical overview,” said Beaupré. “and also an evolution of how their work developed over the years, especially in the beginning.”

One highlight of the collection is the magazine Anonyme Skulpturen which was printed in 1969 to accompany an exhibition of the Bechers’ work in Düsseldorf. This work would become a monograph of the same name, published in 1970, which is also featured in the Paris show.

The printed objects collected by Beupré represent the Bechers’ work from 1964 to 1977, while a presentation of their monographs, mounted under plexiglass and affixed to the gallery walls, span from 1970 to the present day.

The second section of the Paris show features a selection of 117 photographs chosen by Hilla Becher (Bernd Becher passed away in 2007) from the 1977 book Zeche Zollern II – Photographs of Bernd & Hilla Becher. Together, these prints, objects and publications are a comprehensive tribute to the Bechers’ long and prolific photographic career.


Antoine de Beaupré is a curator and the founder of the Librairie 213 in Paris.

Bernd and Hilla Becher—Printed materials 1964-2012 is on display at Paris Photo from Nov. 15 to 18.

Slideluck Potshow London: Two highlights – Japan, I wish I knew your name by Pierfrancesco Celada and Mute: The Silence of Dogs by Martin Usborne

Slideluck Potshow London, organized by Mariateresa Salvati and invited to Brighton by the Miniclicks Photo Talks crew, held its first event in Brighton on Sunday to screen a selection of photos from past editions. 24 works were chosen by New Statesman photo editor, Rebecca McClelland, and artistic director and curator of QUAD and coFounder and director of FORMAT Festival, Louise Clements. As with Pecha Kucha, there is a particular formula for the events which take place in cities around the world. The event is free and is organised on a voluntary basis.

What is Slideshow Potluck?
“It is a NYC-based arts non-profit, operating in many cities globally, that aims to bring people together around food and art, and to give people an interesting, engaging, and fun platform for sharing art with their community.” From the website.

PIERFRANCESCO CELADA – JAPAN, I WISH I KNEW YOUR NAME

Japan, I wish I knew your name from pierfrancesco celada on Vimeo.

Pierfrancesco Celada is one to watch and his multimedia piece, Japan, I wish I knew your name, with its artful interplay of still photography, moving image and sound, was, for me, one of the highlights of the Slideshow. Why? Because the whole concept works really well as a multimedia work; it is well-conceived, wonderfully executed and is elevated by its aesthetic considerations, sequencing, use of camera shots and the ambient soundscapes. I was utterly transported for all 3mins 51 secs.

The work was produced at Magnum in Motion, New York, courtesy of Ideastap Photographic Award and received an Honourable Mention, Lensculture International Exposure Awards, 2011.

Celada writes: “During a brief visit to Japan in 2009 I was soon fascinated by the isolation and loneliness I was feeling in the streets. It started as a personal journey, a foreigner traveling in an alien environment. Language and cultural differences were only augmenting this distance between the locals and me. However, while observing people, it was clear that even indigenous were not able to interact successfully. I have then decided to come back in 2010 and better visualize these concepts.

“The Tokyo-Nagoya-Osaka Megalopolis, also called Taiheiyō Belt is a unique example of urban agglomeration with an estimated population of over 80 million people. Despite this incredibly high number of chances to interact, it seems that society is moving in the opposite direction. The purpose of this investigation is to create awareness and highlight the problems that modernization and the rapid changes in the environment create in our lives. Is it still important to be, or feel, part of a group? Do we feel part of the environment? Are we alone in the crowd?” From the website.

MARTIN USBORNE – MUTE – THE SILENCE OF DOGS IN CARS


© Martin Osborne, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, 2012
I love Martin’s body of work, The Silence of Dogs in Cars, which was featured in Hotshoe magazine. So it was fantastic to see the collection of images as a slideshow and the immersion in the backroom of the Green Door in Brighton seemed to echo that of the dogs in the cars, especially as photographers were dotted round the room taking photos as we watched the show. (Note to organizers: I find that it disturbs my concentration when I’m watching a slideshow or film and I know that people are taking photos. What about after the show, rather than during?)

I really feel for these dogs and Martin does too. In fact, he cares so much that he’s set up A year to help blog where you can follow his progress as he attempts “to save all animals everywhere” in a year. I should put him in touch with my mum, who wants some of her ashes scattered in the Coliseum or Torre Argentina where the Gatti di Roma (Cats of Rome) have special status.

I love the text on his website too: “Martin lives in East London where he has his photographic studio. He is interested in the ever-curious and often disturbing relationship between humans and other animals.” However, if he reads this, there is the letter n missing from the first ‘and’ in the text on his site, I’ve added it here. Call me pedantic, but I’d rather mention it so that it can be rectified, than ignore it.

If you’re going to Paris Photo, Martin will be doing a book signing of Mute – The Silence of Dogs in Cars tomorrow at 4pm at the Kehrer Publishing stand, EE3. And if you miss this, you can catch the show in London next year from 19 March  – 27 April 2013 when it will be exhibited at The Little Black Gallery.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photographers blogs, Photography Shows, short films Tagged: brighton, HotShoe, Japan I wish I knew your name, Kehrer Publishing, Louise Clements, Mariateresa Salvati, Paris Photo, Pierfrancesco Celada, Rebecca McClelland, Slideluck Potshow Brighton, The Little Black Gallery, The Silence of Dogs

Oliver Dignal, Azure Clouds #1

Oliver Dignal, Azure Clouds #1

Oliver Dignal

Azure Clouds #1,
Las Vegas, 2011
From the Azure Clouds series
Website – OliverDignal.de

Oliver Dignal was born in Frankfurt a.M., Germany in 1985. Studying art history at J.W.Goethe Universität, Frankfurt a.M., (2005-2006) he has been part of Klasse Martin Liebscher at Hochschule für Gestaltung, Offenbach am Main since 2008. Currently finishing his studies, he is also one of the founders of Album, Magazin für Fotografie (since 2010), which has released its third issue this year and held appearance at Paris Photo and further events in Hamburg, Vevey, Budapest etc. In 2010 also he won the Deutsche Börse Fotoförderpreis. His latest work is shown in the recent issue of waterfall magazine London/Taiwan. He lives and works in Berlin. 

Paris Month of Photography 2012: Hi-Resolution Slideshow

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For people who love photography, Paris is THE place to be in November.

There are literally more exhibitions, events, conferences, lectures, and booksignings than anyone can possible see in one month during the citywide celebration of the photographic image. Here we show a preview of the biennial Month of Photography. We also preview the upcoming exhibitions of the fringe festival, Mois de la Photo OFF, as well as a comprehensive overview of the photography art market and fair Paris Photo.

Lens Culture is pleased to host the 3rd annual Lens Culture FotoFest Paris international portfolio review November 12-14, including a Meet the Artist evening that features emerging photographers from 35 countries — an amazing evening that is free and open to the public, November 13.