Tag Archives: Paris MéTro

Thibault Brunet: First Person Shooter

(c) Thibault Brunet

Exhibition on view:
April 19 – May 19, 2012

4RT Contemporary
Chaussée de Waterloo, 1038
1180 Brussels

French photographer Thibault Brunet takes a photojournalist’s approach to his seemingly studio-lit portraits of soldiers, following troops through their daily missions passing through war zones and rubble waiting for those moments when “something seems to go wrong and a state of disorder sets in.” These photographs from the series First Person Shooter, along with some work from his latest series Paris: In the Aftermath of War, will be on view as part of his solo show at 4RT Contemporary in Brussels (through May 19, 2012).

“An undefined gaze or the glassy eye of a soldier; the disorientation at a Paris Métro station,” the gallery writes in their press release, “clearly familiar to us but now emptied of its usual crowds and devastated by an unknown conflict: these visuals challenge the spectator and require another look, a second reading.”

His work was profiled by Time‘s LightBox last year, which also explored his use of video game screenshots in the series, accompanied by a gallery of images from the show now in Brussels.

Brunet was also selected as runner up for Aperture’s 2011 Portfolio Prize for his work in First Person Shooter. More information on the 2012 Portfolio Prize call for entries will be available soon, but only Aperture magazine subscribers are qualified for entry, so have a look at some of work of the past recipients and runners up, and sign up today.

Tom M. Johnson

I recently received this e-mail from my friend Tom M. Johnson:

If you happen to find yourself in Paris next month I invite you to My Private Art Room in the Marais for a glass of champagne. I am having a solo show where I will be exhibiting work from both “Lakewood: Portraits of a Sacred American Suburb” and “Au Bout de la Ligne (At the End of the Line).” As written on the invitation, it is truly a photographic journey into contemporary suburban life. Besides, Paris is beautiful in October.

All I can say is, “Wow, I wish I could”. Tom is no stranger to Paris, having worked in the city of lights in his earlier incarnation as a model, but he already had a camera in hand and created a terrific project on what he found at the end of the Paris metro lines…all 29 of them. When he returned to the states, and to his hometown of Lakewood, CA, he began to see small town life in a new way, and has captured it brilliantly through portraiture and place. It was recently featured on the NY Times Lens blog.

His exhibit of these two bodies of work opens at My Private Art Room in Paris on October 13th and runs through October 30th.

Au bout de la ligne
It was living in Paris in the eighties that inspired me to become a photographer, however, it wasn’t until I returned twenty years later that I was roused to photograph the city that had taught me so much about life and art. Yet, I wanted to avoid taking just another of the tens of thousands of photographs that had already been taken of Paris. I mulled over this for weeks, trying to conceptualize a new technique or method of approach to the project, until one early morning, after a long dinner party sitting on a train in the direction of La Defense, the northwest terminus of line number 1, the inspiration emerged. I had ridden the metro throughout Paris, yet I had always traveled in the direction of, but never to, Au Bout de la Ligne. I asked myself–What type of Paris exists at the end of each line? Do the lines end in the suburbs (banlieue)? Are the people who live in the banlieue dissimilar to those who live in the center of Paris? I took the metro to all 29 ends of the 14 metro lines in search of provocative moments, visuals, portraits, and answers to my questions.

Bobigny Terminus Picasso

Châtillon Un Couple

Créteil Un Batiment

La Defense Des Voitures et Grand Batiments

Mairie de Lilas Un Joint

Mairie des Lilas Un Mur

Mairied Ivry Des Couleurs et Feuilles

Nation La Manège

Pont de Levallois Un Biere

Porte de la Chapelle Un Champ

Lakewood: A Photographic Journal of a Sacred American Suburb: I search for provocative portraits and relics of Lakewood’s middle class. I come upon kids riding their bikes whose parents are watchful of strangers but not threatened by them, women tending their yards, and men tinkering inside their garages. I interact with these folks, many whom I share similar concerns and interests. They question why I am taking pictures or if I work for a newspaper. When I tell them my pursuit is only artistic many shake their heads. But for every one who is uncomfortable with my presence, there are those who welcome me to photograph them and their front yards.

Images from Lakewood

31 Photographers: Opening Party, Paris, 28 September

EXPOinvite_Paris 2011-550.jpgPlease join us for a glass of wine, and see the award-winning work of 31 great contemporary photographers (all winners from Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2010). The show is on display now at Spos Gallery, 7 rue Jules Valls, 75011 Paris (nearest Metro: Charonne). The party is on Wednesday 28 September, from 5 pm to 9 pm. new homes . Don’t miss it!

More info on our Facebook page. And please tell all of your friends. longboard deck . It’s going to be a very international art crowd, and lots of fun and inspiration.

Playful, seductive nude photo animations in Paris

Présence M, by Floriane de Lassée. 1 min loop, 1x1m80 retro-projection.

French artist Floriane de Lassée — who is well known for her earlier, meditative, large-format architectural photographs with figures — only recently started making short films and videos from stills. We were thrilled to discover her new work when she submitted it to Lens Culture last year. And we are delighted that these captivating video animations will be featured as life-size rear-projections at a Galerie Philippe Chaume in Paris.

Floriane de Lassée says this about the new work, Presences:

Presences plays with the place of the human body in our minds. Our bodies create our boundaries; they carry and constrain the human spirit. What stories do we tell with what we reveal and what we hide? What do we choose to show the world? Can the human body ever truly be “shown” in its entirety?

Subjects in the series appear behind a translucent structure through which they may both reveal and hide themselves. Imprisoned, glimpsed, imagined, transformed, they disappear and emerge all at once. The video is backlit (retro projection) on a semi-transparent surface, similar to the one through which the series’ subjects were photographed. Each full-scale video is a human scale loop. The device and the back of the installation are hidden by a box or a big black cloth so we can think that it is a real person behind a window.

Have our subjects been trapped, held captive behind a wall of light? Or are they surging forward from ether to matter, from imagination to reality?

Présence Julien, by Floriane de Lassée. 1 min loop, 1×1.80m, retro-projected.

These videos and others are showing, life-size, at Galerie Philippe Chaume in Paris, April 8-June 4.

Exposition “Présences” à la galerie Philippe Chaume: 08 Avril au 04 Juin 2011.
Vernissage le mercredi 07 Avril de 18h à 21h.
9 rue de Marseille, 75010 Paris – Métro République

www.galeriephilippechaume.com

Visit the artist’s website to see more.

Paris: Carnet de Recherche by Krass Clement

Seeing the name Paris scream across the cover of Krass Clement’s newest book Paris: Carnet de Recherche I braced myself for disappointment. The “home” of street photography has produced numerous books in the past which find themselves amounting to little beyond “greatest hits” collections of images offering syrupy nostalgia and no surprise. Clement is well aware of those familiar trappings – perhaps that is why the cover image printed right on the book’s cloth shows a romantic Paris metro X-d out by a couple of steel girders. His is an uphill battle which I am delighted to see proves he is an artist who tests our expectations.

As in the best of Clement’s books, Paris: Carnet de Recherche is a personal journey. Starting with a suite of images entering the city by train, we pass by cold landscapes of factories in dense grey light. Upon arrival, the city itself and its citizens appear weighed down and sluggish. Light seems to fight to illuminate the architecture and streets. It is hardly a warm arrival – our first destination – an empty cafe.

Photographed in both 35mm and square formats, Clement weaves through the city lingering for moments on small sequences of images – a woman improvises a dance in a bar that briefly lightens the mood; a protest in the streets led by youth. Interspersed are a few intimate images of women in hotel rooms, perhaps we are not traveling alone but our wanderings in the streets seem perceived through the eyes of someone longing for connection. Less for connection to place but for people.

In many of Clement’s books of the past there is an obvious filmic quality. The repetition of images allows the subtlety of events to play out with surprising result without feeling indulgent. Following the gestures of a man swallowing a drink while two women gossip in the background is resonant in its simplicity. There is less of that “step by step” quality here which I find often so powerful, but I suppose it is due to when these images were made in his life as a photographer. Photographed in the 60s and 70s these would consist of early works of Clement’s perhaps done before he was fully conscious of the methods he would employ in his later work and bookcraft. Here the sequence at times feels like a stream of jump-cuts and can appear sporadic. This might have been a fatal flaw to the book had Clement not been the great photographer he is. Still, he finds the connections between the individual frames to form links that, for the observant, will not disappoint. The end picture of a sequence of nighttime streets protests of youths burning a car is of a small wedding party where the wedding dress and veil reflect the previous conflagration. In another pairing, a woman on a subway hangs on the arm of a lover while on the facing page, a woman supports a dress she is offering for sale at a street market.

Bookwise, Paris: Carnet de Recherche is beautifully done. The publisher Gyldendal which releases many of Clemen’t books has again done a superb job with design and printing. One relief is that there is no introductory text nor afterword – the photographs are allowed to stand on their own as an open-ended journey.

Clement’s Novemberreisse from 2008 was one of my favorite books of the year and I was happy to see Paris: Carnet de Recherche appear as a “best of” suggestion by a couple people in the comments of my 2010 list. It was a steady contender for inclusion on mine as well but it has taken me some extra time to fully appreciate its nuances. Like most of Clement’s best, it is a slow and quiet burn that lingers long after the covers are closed.

Paris: Carnet de Recherche by Krass Clement

Seeing the name Paris scream across the cover of Krass Clement’s newest book Paris: Carnet de Recherche I braced myself for disappointment. The “home” of street photography has produced numerous books in the past which find themselves amounting to little beyond “greatest hits” collections of images offering syrupy nostalgia and no surprise. Clement is well aware of those familiar trappings – perhaps that is why the cover image printed right on the book’s cloth shows a romantic Paris metro X-d out by a couple of steel girders. His is an uphill battle which I am delighted to see proves he is an artist who tests our expectations.

As in the best of Clement’s books, Paris: Carnet de Recherche is a personal journey. Starting with a suite of images entering the city by train, we pass by cold landscapes of factories in dense grey light. Upon arrival, the city itself and its citizens appear weighed down and sluggish. Light seems to fight to illuminate the architecture and streets. It is hardly a warm arrival – our first destination – an empty cafe.

Photographed in both 35mm and square formats, Clement weaves through the city lingering for moments on small sequences of images – a woman improvises a dance in a bar that briefly lightens the mood; a protest in the streets led by youth. Interspersed are a few intimate images of women in hotel rooms, perhaps we are not traveling alone but our wanderings in the streets seem perceived through the eyes of someone longing for connection. Less for connection to place but for people.

In many of Clement’s books of the past there is an obvious filmic quality. The repetition of images allows the subtlety of events to play out with surprising result without feeling indulgent. Following the gestures of a man swallowing a drink while two women gossip in the background is resonant in its simplicity. There is less of that “step by step” quality here which I find often so powerful, but I suppose it is due to when these images were made in his life as a photographer. Photographed in the 60s and 70s these would consist of early works of Clement’s perhaps done before he was fully conscious of the methods he would employ in his later work and bookcraft. Here the sequence at times feels like a stream of jump-cuts and can appear sporadic. This might have been a fatal flaw to the book had Clement not been the great photographer he is. Still, he finds the connections between the individual frames to form links that, for the observant, will not disappoint. The end picture of a sequence of nighttime streets protests of youths burning a car is of a small wedding party where the wedding dress and veil reflect the previous conflagration. In another pairing, a woman on a subway hangs on the arm of a lover while on the facing page, a woman supports a dress she is offering for sale at a street market.

Bookwise, Paris: Carnet de Recherche is beautifully done. The publisher Gyldendal which releases many of Clemen’t books has again done a superb job with design and printing. One relief is that there is no introductory text nor afterword – the photographs are allowed to stand on their own as an open-ended journey.

Clement’s Novemberreisse from 2008 was one of my favorite books of the year and I was happy to see Paris: Carnet de Recherche appear as a “best of” suggestion by a couple people in the comments of my 2010 list. It was a steady contender for inclusion on mine as well but it has taken me some extra time to fully appreciate its nuances. Like most of Clement’s best, it is a slow and quiet burn that lingers long after the covers are closed.