Tag Archives: Paolo Pellegrin

Features and Essays | November 2012

Photojournalism_Links

Second month in a row that Paolo Pellegrin has work in the National Geographic magazine…and what a timing for the subject, since the series was probably shot months and months ago and  based on an editor’s note the issue was just going to press when the most recent Gaza conflict escalated.

Amazing work. The below photo might not represent the story as well as some of the other photos in the NatGeo edit, it’s not directly related to the tunnels for one,  but I think it looks incredible and symbolises well Gaza as the world’s largest outdoor prison, which it in many ways is.

Photo © Paolo Pellegrin

Photo © Paolo Pellegrin

Paolo Pellegrin: The Tunnels of Gaza (NGM) ‘They are a lifeline of the underground economy but also a death trap. For many Palestinians, they have come to symbolize ingenuity and the dream of mobility.’

Frédéric Sautereau: Gaza (Paris Match)

David Degner: Scenes from Gaza’s Violence (Newsweek)

Terrific series in December’s NatGeo magazine by Carolyn Drake.

Photo © Carolyn Drake

Photo © Carolyn Drake

Carolyn Drake: Shamans: Masters of Ecstasy (NGM) ‘They are shamans—called by spirits to heal bodies, minds, and souls—and their numbers are growing.’

Great photos from Cuba on the New York Times website… Photographer’s name withheld… My guess is these might be Tomas Munita photos… but you are welcome to prove me wrong, if you have solid information.

Credit: The New York Times

Credit: The New York Times

[anonymous]: Changes in Cuba Create Support for Easing Embargo (NYT)

Julien Goldstein: Cuba (Photographer’s website)

Eros Hoagland: A Reckoning at the Frontier (NYT Lens) ‘Photographs of the Mexican Drug War Along the Border’

Michael Robinson Chavez: Rio de Favela (LA Times) [multimedia] | ‘Rio de Janeiro’s favelas border the city’s toniest areas and beaches. Rio is attempting to pacify the slums with a massive police presence. Still, drug gangs litter the city within sight of the stadium scheduled to host the Olympic Games in 2016.’

Two different edits of Robin Hammond’s Zimbabwe work which won the Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award…

Photo © Robin Hammond

Photo © Robin Hammond

Robin Hammond: Your Wounds Will Be Named Silence (Paris Match) Zimbabwe

Robin Hammond:  Zimbabwe (Lightbox)

“The challenge today is to make stories that transcend the millions of pictures that are shot but don’t actually say anything, to make sure that you’re giving a message through powerful photography and giving a voice to the people who are in your images.”  – Tom Stoddart

Audio slideshow of Tom Stoddart’s South Sudan work on the ICRC website, narrated by the photographer himself.

Photo © Tom Stoddart

Photo © Tom Stoddart

Tom Stoddart: Into The Earth (ICRC) South Sudan

John Stanmeyer: Battle-worn South Sudan copes with refugee health crisis (CNN Photos)

Congo crisis.

Well edited gallery on Time website with strong photos by Jerome Delay, Phil Moore, Tony Karumba et al.

Photo © Jerome Delay / AP

Photo © Jerome Delay / AP

(various photographers): Congo’s Crisis: Rebels Launch Offensive in Country’s East (TIME)

(various photographers): Rebel Attacks in Eastern Congo  (The Atlantic – In Focus)

Photo © Dominic Nahr

Photo © Dominic Nahr

Dominic Nahr: Rebels Gain Ground in the DRC (Magnum)

Jerome Delay: Battle in Eastern Congo (Washington Post)

Photo © Phil Moore / AFP

Photo © Phil Moore / AFP

Phil Moore: La Chite De Goma (Paris Match)

Phil Moore:  Congolese people flee town of Sake as fighting breaks out (Guardian) ‘As rebels and government-allied militia fight for the town of Sake, the Congolese inhabitants fled to the safety of the camps in the east’

Phil Moore: M23 fighters capture Goma in the DR Congo (Al Jazeera)

Jehad Nga: Deep Wounds of Past Produce New Violence in Congo (NYT)

Great portraits series on South Africa’s AIDS orphans by Jonathan Torgovnik

Photo © Jonathan Torgovnik

Photo © Jonathan Torgovnik

Jonathan Torgovnik: Generation of Orphans: South Africa’s Children of AIDS (Lightbox)

Greg Marinovich: South African Miners Strike at Fear (NYT Lens)

Per-Anders Pettersson: A Microcosm of the New South Africa (NYT Lens)

Pascal Maitre: An African Journey (NYT Lens)

Fernando Moleres: Sierra Leone Prisons (Lightbox)

Benedicte Kurzen: In Mozambique, a New Prosperity for Some (NYT)

Joe Penney: Guinea-Bissau (Guardian) ‘Reuters photographer Joe Penney depicts life in Guinea-Bissau and explores the legacy of years of conflict on this tiny West African country, from the fading symbols of its former Portuguese rulers, to the plight of those who fought for independence, and the impact that years of war have had on the current generation’

Moises Saman photographing the most recent turmoil in Cairo for TIME…brilliant photos..

Photo © Moises Saman

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman: Egypt: Thousands Protest President Morsy’s Decree (Time) NB last 6 photos in the slideshow by other photographers

Rena Effendi: Egypt Dispatch: Coptic Christians Grapple With Fear and Faith (Mother Jones)

Jerome Sessini: Battleground Aleppo (Magnum)

Matilde Gattoni: The Swallows of Syria (Lightbox)

Tom Pilston: The Battles for Syria (Panos)

(various photographers): Syria in Ruins (The Atlantic)

Niclas Hammarstrom: Syria’s Killing Fields (zReportage)

Adam Ferguson: Irak (Paris Match)

Andrew McConnell’s portrait series of urban refugees in different parts of the world…Fantastic..

Photo © Andrew McConnell

Photo © Andrew McConnell

Andrew McConnell: Hidden Lives (Panos) The untold story of urban refugees.

Stephanie Sinclair: The Secret World Of Child Brides (VII Magazine)

Sanjit Das: Amarnath Yatra (Panos) ‘Every year, hundreds of thousands of pilgrims make their way up to the Amarnath cave, 3,888 metres above sea level in the Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir, to visit one of the holiest sites in Hinduism.’

Sanjit Das: Burning Issue (FT Weekend) ‘India is suffering an unprecedented energy crisis. So why are fires being left to rage in Jharia, home to its richest coalfields?’

Sanjit Das: Malnutrition in an Indian Village (Businessweek)

Gaël Turine: The Fence of Shame (Agence Vu)

Raghu Rai: Desperate battle to save India’s children (BBC)

Brent Lewin: Sightseeing at India’s Camel Fair (WSJ)

Q. Sakamaki in the latest Newsweek Int’l…

Photo © Q. Sakamaki

Photo © Q. Sakamaki

Q. Sakamaki: China’s Outer Lands (Newsweek)

Bruno Barbey: Shanghai (Magnum)

Zhang Kechun: China’s Yellow River (Lightbox)

Sim Chi Yin: In China, a New Beginning (NYT)

Sim Chi Yin: Les révoltés de Wukan (Le Monde)

Sim Chi Yin: A Changsha, on n’arrête plus le progrès (Le Monde)

Joachim Ladefoged: +852 Hong Kong (VII)

Shiho Fukada’s series on young Japanese women working as hostesses.

Photo © Shiho Fukada

Photo © Shiho Fukada

Shiho Fukada: Cinderellas of the Night (Panos) ‘Job opportunities for women in Japan are scarce. A mere 65 % of women who graduate from university find permanent employment. Working as a hostess, or kyabajo, has become a viable, and well paid, alternative for many educated young women.~~In Japan, a hostess is a young woman who entertains men at bars or clubs. Customers pay considerable sums of money for the pleasure of their company – for flirting but no sex.’

Shiho Fukada: No Country for Old Men (Panos)

Shiho Fukada: Internet Cafe Refugees (Panos)

Michael Wolf: Tokyo’s Commuters (Slate)

Gary Knight: How China Wields ‘Soft Power’ in the Golden Triangle (Pulitzer Center) Burma |  ‘This place has always served as a watery junction where human and physical geographies collide. Burma, Laos and Thailand all meet here, as do the great Mekong and its smaller tributary, the Ruak, which tumbles down out of the Shan Hills.’

Gilles Sabrie: Towards a New Myanmar (Photographer’s website)

Ian The: Burma Spring (Agence Vu)

Kuni Takahashi: In Western Myanmar, a History of Hatred Emerges (NYT)

Alexander F. Yuan: The Waiting House: Caring for Burma’s HIV Patients (TIME)

Jes Aznar: A Baby Boom in the Philippines (IHT)

John Vink: Cambodia: The Off-ASEAN (Photographer’s website)

Taslima Akhter: Fighting Hopelessness Amid Ashes (NYT Lens) Aftermatch of garment factory fire on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul Movie Houses Take a Break From Insurgents and Chaos (Wired)

Bryan Denton: Herat, an Unusually Modern Afghan City (NYT)

Daniel Berehulak: Afghan War Amputees And Civilians Treated At ICRC Orthopedic Center (Getty Images archive)

Lorexon Tugnoli: Kabul’s Sex Workers Get Organized (WSJ) ‘Prostitutes Teach Colleagues About Condoms and Testing in Afghanistan’s Highly Conservative Society’

Robert Knoth and Antoinette de Jong: Poppy – Trails of Afghan Heroin (Foto8)

Brian Cassey: The Aak Puul Ngantam Stockman (Fotostrada)

Ulet Ifansasti: Death metal: tin mining in Indonesia (Guardian)

Hurricane Sandy.

Great to see Eugene Richards shoot  the Sandy aftermath for TIME…The edit could have been kept a little tighter, but there’s a sense of empathy in many of the photos and Richards’ captions, which really hit home and make you realise the huge magnitude of the devastation caused by Sandy not just on infrastructural, but on human level…

Photo © Eugene Richards

Photo © Eugene Richards

Eugene Richards: Devastation in Staten Island (Lightbox)

Stephen Wilkes: Aerial Photographs of Superstorm Sandy’s Aftermath (Lightbox)

Finlay Mackay: In Sandy’s Shadow: How the Redfern Houses’ True Ordeal Began After the Storm (Lightbox)

Susannah Ray: Recalling the ‘Right Coast,’ Before the Storm (NYT)

Plenty of empathy here too…

Photo © Todd Heisler

Photo © Todd Heisler

Todd Heisler: One Neighborhood, Unimaginable Loss (NYT)

NYT photographers: Glimmers of Light in a Darkened City (NYT Lens)

New Yorker photographers: After Sandy: Manhattan and the Rockaways (Photo Booth)

Massimo Berruti: Hurricane Sandy Aftermath in New York (Agence Vu)

Mario Tama: Superstorm Sandy, the aftermath (Guardian)

U.S. Politics.

Terrific portraits by Marco Grob…

Photo © Marco Grob

Photo © Marco Grob

Marco Grob: Class of 2016: The Political Leaders to Watch (Lighbox)

Grant Cornett: A History of the Campaign in 100 Objects (Lightbox)

TIME photographers: The 2012 Presidential Election Year in Pictures (Lightbox)

Christopher Morris: On the Road with Mitt Romney (Lightbox)

Christopher Morris: Romney Republicans (Photographer’s website)

Brooks Kraft: Last Days on the Road with Obama (Lightbox)

Michael Mergen: The Halls of Democracy: Places of Civic Responsibility (Lightbox)

Daniel Borris: Ohio’s Faith in Democracy (NYT)

Ashley Gilbertson and Ed Kashi: The Undecided (Photo Booth) video

Ashley Gilbertson: Ohio Voters: Before and After (Photo Booth)

New Yorker photographers: Election Morning: Florida and Virginia (Photo Booth

New Yorker photographers:  Election Day (Photo Booth)

New Yorker photographers: Scenes from Election Night (Photo Booth)

New Yorker photographers: Election Day: Swing States and Beyond (Photo Booth)

Jon Lowenstein: Election Night on Chicago’s South Side, in Polaroids (Photo Booth)

In awe of Hiroyuki Ito’s work in Lens…. (Last frame gave me a flashback of a Christopher Anderson’s Capitolio pic  #random)

Photo © Hiroyuki Ito

Photo © Hiroyuki Ito

Hiroyuki Ito: NYC (NYT Lens)

Pieter Hugo: Empire of the In-Between (NYT Magazine) video |  NB only the stills seen in the video by Hugo

Alec Soth: Foam Party (NYT Magazine)

Henry Leutwyler: Behind the Curtain at the New York City Ballet (New York Magazine)

Emine Ziyatdinova: In Brighton Beach, a Bittersweet Peace (NYT Lens)

Doug Ricard: Street View (Photo Booth)

Larry Racioppo: Hoops Spring Eternal (NYT Lens)

Brendan Hoffman: Gorgeous Photos From the Front Lines of Outsourcing (Wired)

Briony Campbell and Duncan Nicol Robertson: A New World – Hope and Fear on an American Roadtrip (Foto8)

Will Seberger: Homeland (zReportage)

Strong set on Portugal’s economic crisis by Mauricio Lima and equally so, one on Spain’s financial woes by Samuel Aranda… Both shot on assignment for The New York Times…

Photo © Mauricio Lima

Photo © Mauricio Lima

Mauricio Lima: Portugal Passes Another Austere Budget (NYT)

Samuel Aranda: Evictions on the Rise in Spain (NYT)

Samuel Aranda: Spanish Crisis (Photographer’s website)

Alvaro Deprit: Once Upon a Time in Tabernas (NYT Lens)

Guy Martin: Deadly Dust of Taranto (Panos) Italy

Murray Ballard: Cryonics (Wired)

Sophie Gerrard: The Dunes (Foto8)

Kayte Brimacombe: Homelessness: Mario’s story (Guardian)

Kenneth O’Halloran: Muddy Business (NYT Magazine) NB not the first photo in the slideshow | Irish jockeys

New Yorker Photo Booth showcased work from Magnum’s new book ‘Magnum: Revolution: 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom’

Magnum photographers: Revolutions (New Yorker Photo Booth) Related in Telegraph

Joop Swart Masterclass essays.

The future is bright for lot of these guys I’m sure…

Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 15.57.52

Joop Swart Masterclass 2012 essays (World Press Photo)

Martin Parr: Life’s a Beach (Paris Match)

Ami Vitale: Bathtime (Panos) Hungary

Mugur Varzariu : Roma (NYT Lens)

Michal Solarski: Hungarian Sea (Burn)

Amanda Rivkin: Bachelor parties in Prague (CNN Photos)

Mathias Depardon: Tracing the past along the Black Sea’s coast (CNN Photos)

Andrew Testa: ‘He also collected books’ (Panos) Penis museum in Iceland

Thomas Peschak: The Shark Trade of the Arabian Sea (Lightbox)

Tearsheet of The Day | Paolo Pellegrin from Cuba for the National Geographic

I already shared a link with a photo to Paolo Pellegrin’s National Geographic feature, Cuba’s New Now, in the last Features and Essays post,but I also want to show how good the opening spread looks in the actual magazine. blog comment . Stunning.

pp. 28-29 National Geographic magazine. November 2012 issue. Caption: A window reflects an image of Fidel Castro in a working-class Havana neighborhood few tourists see. Photo Paolo Pellegrin

Paolo Pellegrin (b.1964. Italy) is a Magnum photographer who lives in Rome and New York City.

Features and Essays | October 2012

Love this Cuba feature by Paolo Pellegrin for the National Geographic Magazine. Published in the November issue.

Photo © Paolo Pellegrin

Paolo Pellegrin: Cuba’s New Now (NGM) After half a century under Castro, Cubans feel a wary sense of possibility. But this time, don’t expect a revolution.

Also in the latest National Geographic Magazine issue…Eugene Richards from Arkansas Delta… his feature mixes current work with photos from the early 70s.

Photo © Eugene Richards

Eugene Richards: Return to the Arkansas Delta (NGM) The delta west of the Mississippi River was once a place where sharecroppers lived in segregation and poverty yet forged a vibrant community. Industrial farming has erased their culture, leaving behind endless sky and few people. Eugene Richards documented their world four decades ago. Now he returns to where his pictures began.

Dominic Nahr’s recent Somalia work shot for Time, now on his agency’s website.

Photo © Dominic Nahr

Dominic Nahr: Scarred Somalia’s War on al-Qaeda (Magnum)

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The Ladies of Guera (Panos) Chad

Kate Holt: Inside Somalia: Violence Against Women and Girls (Guardian) multimedia

New work by Stephanie Sinclair on her child brides project.

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair: Trading Childhood for Marriage (CNN)

Jessica Dimmock short film on the same young woman…

Jessica Dimmock: Too Young to Wed: Destaye (Vimeo)

Some of Sinclair’s Child Brides in Politiken…

Stephanie Sinclair: Child Brides (Politiken)

Jerome Delay: Niger’s Hunger Brides (Guardian)

Mads Nissen: A Silent Libya After Gadhafi (CNN)

Louis Quail: Libya: Life After Gaddafi (Guardian)

Ben Lowy: iLibya: Growing Pains (Reportage by Getty Images)

Ben Lowy: iLibya (Mother Jones)

Ilvy Njiokiktjien: Afrikaner Blood (Politiken) multimedia

Nicola Lo Calzo: Slavery’s Ghosts (Newsweek)

James Oatway: A Tale of Two Angolas (Panos)

Kieran Doherty: Daily Life in Liberia (Guardian)

Pierre Crocquet: Confronting Childhood Sexual Abuse (NYT Lens)

Magnum nominee Jerome Sessini has been documenting violence in Culiacan, Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez in Mexico for years… He has a book titled The Wrong Side coming out in spring 2013… Some of the work in CNN photo blog..

Photo © Jerome Sessini

Jerome Sessini: The wrong side’ of the Mexican border (CNN)

David Rochkind: Mexico’s drug war ‘impossible to ignore’ (CNN)

Matt Black: After the Fall (NYT Lens) Mexico

Matt King: Being Strong – Growing up with Violence in Mexico (Foto8)

Miguel Alvarez Bravo: retrospective (Lightbox)

Oscar B. Castillo had a terrific slideshow on Lightbox just before the recent Venezuelan presidential elections…

Photo © Oscar B. Castillo

Oscar B. Castillo: The Street Gangs of Caracas (Lightbox)

Meridith Kohut: Portraits of Chavez Supporters (NYT)

Tomas Munita: Chile’s Challenge on Easter Island (NYT)

Stephen Ferry: Violentology: Colombian Conflict (Lightbox)

Yuri Kozyrev: The Occupation of the Belo Monte Dam (NOOR) Brazil

Miquel Dewever-Plana (photographer) Isabelle Fougere (writer): Alma: A Tale of Guatemala’s Violence (Lightbox)

Jorge Dan Lopez: Thieves face lynch mob (Reuters) Guatemala City | related: photographer’s blog post

Time Lightbox recently shared a 100+ image edit of chief White House photographer Pete Souza’s work on the Obama presidency… I guess I should probably take these images with a grain of salt in the journalistic sense considering he is employed by the administration he is documenting, but I do find the work fascinating…It’s a great historical record…with loads of really terrific frames…

Photo © Pete Souza/White House

Pete Souza: Portrait of a Presidency (Lightbox)

Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath photos in New Yorker Photo Booth by various photographers…

New Yorker: Hurricane Sandy in Photos (Photo Booth)  Sandy’s Aftermath, NYC (Photo Booth) After Sandy in Manhattan And The Rockaways (Photo Booth)

Time sent five photographers to document the hurricane…

Time (photographers Michael Christopher Brown, Benjamin Lowy, Ed Kashi, Andrew Quilty and Stephen Wilkes): In the Eye of the Storm: Capturing Sandy’s Wrath (Lightbox)

Shaul Schwarz shot Sandy for NBC News.

Shaul Schwarz: Sandy’s path of destruction leaves mark on Brooklyn (NBC News)

Photo © Joe Amon

Joe Amon: Heroin in Denver : The Story of Alice and Iris (Denver Post)

Andrew Hetherington: Inside the Pot Industrial Complex (Newsweek)

Ashley Gilbertson: Incarceration’s Stigma – Mercedes Smith (VII)

Ron Haviv: Incarceration’s Stigma – Ronald Day (VII)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: Sharing Life and Liquor on a Changing Bushwick Street (NYT Lens)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: In Drug-Riddled Bushwick, Revisiting a Steadfast Friend (NYT Lens)

21st century FSA…

Photo © Andrew Lichtenstein

Andrew Lichtenstein: An American Place (Facing Change)

Gary Knight: Inmigracion Topografia (VII)

Marc Asnin: Embracing Uncle Charlie (CNN)

Brendan Hoffman: Middle-class America searches for new identity (CNN)

Bryan Schutmaat: Beauty, sorrow of American West (CNN)

NYT (various photographers): Fracking (NYT Lens)

Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South (CNN)

Don Doll: Native Americans (NYT Lens)

Really like the below shot by Christopher Anderson of VP Biden… Shame there’s only half a dozen photos in the series on Magnum website…

Photo © Christopher Anderson

Christopher Anderson: Joe Biden (Magnum)

Christopher Anderson: A Political Portfolio (New York magazine)

Charles Ommanney: Romney in Florida (Newsweek)

Peter Bohler: From the Campaign Trail with Paul Ryan (Lightbox)

Christopher Morris: Republican Faces (VII)

Brendan Hoffman: Photos of What It Looks Like To Be a Democrat (PhotoShelter)

Greta Pratt: Looking Presidential (NYT Lens)

Robert Leslie: A Photographic Road Trip Through a Familiar Superpower (NYT Lens)

Benedict Evans: Behind the Scenes of Platon’s “Adversaries” (New Yorker)

Alec Soth: Looking for Love (Lightbox)

Lauren Fleishman: Wheelchair Bodybuilders (Lightbox)

Brian Frank: Mixed Martial Arts (NYT Lens)

Mark Lyon: Staring at the Wall, Encountering Nature (NYT Lens)

Stephen Morton: Geechees Fragile Culture (zReportage)

Rick Sforza: Shrinking Sea (zReportage)

Pat Vasquez-Cunningham: Sacred Mountain Threatened (zReportage)

Photo © Cedric Gerbehaye

Cedric Gerbehaye: Belgium: A Country in Flux (Lightbox)

Charles Ommanney: Made in France (Newsweek)

Andrea Frazzetta: The Enchanted Island of Centenarians (NYT Magazine)

Adam Ferguson shot Greece’s continuing economic crisis for the New York Times…

Photo © Adam Ferguson

Adam Ferguson: Lean Times in Greece as Government Cuts More Spending (NYT) entire edit in VII archive here. Also on offer in colour, which I actually personally slightly prefer.

Zalmai: In Restive Greece, Afghans Greeted by Xenophobia (NYT Lens)

Tom Jamieson: On Europe’s Border (Emaj Magazine) Greece

Andrea Gjestvang: One Day in History (Moment agency archive) Portraits of young people who survived the massacre at the summer camp of Norwegian Labour Youths (AUF), on the island of Utøya outside Oslo on July 22nd 2011

Peter Marlow: Morning glory: England’s cathedrals (FT)

Arnhel de Serra: Rural Britannia (New Yorker)

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff After Dark (Guardian)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Mr. English Beauty (CNN)

Tom Wood: Men and Women (Guardian) UK

Birte Kaufmann: Ireland’s Biggest Minority Group (CNN)

Kuba Kaminski: The Whisperers (NYT Lens) Poland

Piotr Malecki: Commuters (Panos) Poland

I found Alex Majoli’s Paris Fashion Week series to be a proper visual treat… and not talking about the models here…Stylish edgy frames…

Photo © Alex Majoli

Alex Majoli: 2012 Paris Fashion Week (Magnum) different edit on New York Magazine

Artur Conka: The Roma of Lunik IX (Foto8) Slovakia

Lukasz Trzcinski: New Europe. Atlas (NYT Lens)

Landon Nordeman: Euro Dog 2012 (New Yorker) Romania

Joanna Nottebrock and Insa Cathérine Hagemann: Meet the Undertakers (CNN)

Photo © Michael Chelbin

Michael Chelbin: Sailboats and Swans: The Prisons of Russia and Ukraine (Lightbox)

Platon: A Russia for All Russians (Newsweek)

Yanina Shevchenko: Crossing Over – A Trans-Siberian Railway Journey (Foto8)

Misha Friedman: Tuberculosis in the Former Soviet Union (burn)

Colin Delfosse: Les cadets de Mourmansk (Picture Tank)

Spanish photographer Maysun is a new name to me… Seen plenty of strong Syria work from her recently.

Photo © Maysun

Maysun: Syria’s Civil Conflict (Guardian)

Jerome Sessini: Syria (Le Monde)

Photo © Daniel Etter

Daniel Etter: Daily Life in Syria (Newsweek)

Zac Baillie: Syria (Paris Match)

Manu Brabo: The fragility of life in Syria’s borderlands (NBC News)

Bryan Denton: Syria’s War Edges Closer to Turkey (NYT)

Giulio Piscitelli: Aleppo (Photographer’s website)

Uriel Sinai: A Tattoo To Remember (NYT) Israel

Adam Ferguson: In Postwar Iraq, Neither War Nor Peace (NYT Lens)

Jenna Krajeski: A Long Border: Refugees in Iraq Kurdistan (Pulitzer Center)

Photo © Mathias Depardon

Mathias Depardon: Black Sea Postcards (Foto8)

Davide Monteleone: Red Thistle (Lightbox) Caucasus

Toufic Beyhum: Mecca Pilgrimage: Ka’aba, Crowds and Construction (Wired) Saudi Arabia

Carolyn Drake: A Bird in the Hand (Panos) Cyprus

Laura El-Tantawy: The Veil (VII Magazine)

Pyhäjärvi, Finland (Horse and Barn), 1981 © Pentti Sammallahti

Pentti Sammallahti: Here, Far Away – retrospective (Guardian)

George Steinmetz: Sailing the Dunes (NGM) Photographer George Steinmetz has flown over every extreme desert, guided by the shifting sand.

Julian Germain: Classroom Portraits (Lightbox)

Mark Henley: A Sign of Our Times (Panos)

Photo © Pieter ten Hoopen

Pieter ten Hoopen: Wandering in Japan’s ‘Suicide Forest’ (NYT Lens)

Jason Florio: Fighters of the longest war (CNN) The Karen people of Myanmar have been embattled in a civil war with the country’s central government since 1949. It is considered the world’s longest ongoing war.

John Vink: Cambodia: King Norodom Sihanouk Funeral (Photographer’s website)

Photo © Poulomi Basu

Poulomi Basu: On India’s Border, a Changing of the Guard (NYT Lens)

Vivek Singh: Aftermath of ethnic riots in India (CNN)

Alex Masi: A Toxic Tragegy in Bhopal (CNN)

Albertina d’Urso: Sculpting gods from clay (CNN) For centuries, artisans have been crafting statues of Hindu deities on the banks of the Hooghly River in Kolkata, India.

Massimo Berruti’s Pakistan work, for which he received a $5,000 W. Eugene Smith Fellowship this year…

Photo © Massimo Berruti

Massimo Berruti: Pakistan: Fade Into Dust (burn)

Mauricio Lima: Afghans Wary in Push for Mineral Riches (NYT)

John D. McHugh: The People of Afghanistan (Reportage)

Mikhail Galustov: Afghan Faces (New Yorker)

Beijing-based British photographer Sean Gallagher continues his commitment to covering environmental issues…

Photo © Sean Gallagher

Sean Gallagher: Climate change on the Tibetan Plateau (CNN)

Sean Gallagher: China’s Three Rivers, Asia’s Threatened Headwaters (Pulitzer Center)

Nadav Kander: Yangtze – The Long River (NYT Lens)

Sim Chi Yin: In the Shadow’s of Shanghai’s Skyscrapers (BusinessWeek)

James Whitlow Delano: Growth (Chinafile.com) China

Lucas Schifres: Made in China (NYT Lens)

Eric Michael Johnson: Pedaling Under Shanghai’s Stars (WSJ)

Kim Hong-Ji: South Korea’s ‘baby boxes’ (Guardian)

Matthew Niederhauser: K-Pop Star (New Yorker) South Korea

Bharat Sikka: Bhutan (Lightbox)

Stephen Dupont: Portraits of Papua New Guinea Gangsters (Lightbox)

Peter van Agtmael Receives the 2012 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography

On Wednesday night, Magnum photographer Peter van Agtmael received the $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, joining a legion of photojournalists that includes James Nachtwey, Paolo Pellegrin and Brenda Ann Kenneally. Established in 1978, the W. Eugene Smith Grant is one of the most esteemed in the industry, named after the legendary photographer whose harrowing pictures of World War II gave an unparalleled and poignant view of the human toll of the conflict. In a fitting tribute, the annual grant aims to recognize a photographerwho has demonstrated an exemplary commitment to documenting the human condition in the spirit of Smiths concerned photography and dedicated compassion.

Van Agtmael has done that with his long-term project, Disco Night September 11, which focuses on the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and their consequences within the United States. But it was his existing work along with his proposalto show the side of the ongoing wars through Iraqi and Afghan perspectivesthat earned him this years honor. An additional $5,000 fellowship was awarded to photographer Massimo Berruti for The Dusty Path, a combination of works examining victims of drone strikes, missing persons and the fight against militancy in Pakistani classrooms.

At 24the same age as many of the soldiers he would go on to documentvan Agtmael began the project during an embed with Americantroops engaged in heavy fighting around Mosul, Iraq.As an American of the generation shouldering these wars, I feel a strong responsibility to document their cost,” says the photographer, whose lens captured everythingfrom violent firefights and days-long foot patrols to the rehabilitation of those maimed by war.”Over the course of my lifetime, I intend to keep returning to [these conflicts] to create a comprehensive document.

To that end, van Agtmael, now 31, plans to use his grant to capture the other side of the conflictto give face to our ‘enemies’ in the fight. “Im ready to shift my focus to the other side of the war,” he says. “The Iraqis and Afghans that have been most affected remain depersonalized and shadowy in our collective consciousness. We live in a self-absorbed cultureone largely unburdened by memory.

Van Agtmael plans to return to Iraq and Afghanistan to follow these stories, but will also travel to the Middle East and Europe in hopes of documenting their diaspora. He’s timed the conclusion of his project to the American withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014another reminder of the human sacrifice and cost of the war. Heplans to use photographs, video, audio and text to share the entire range of what hes witnessed over the last seven years; still, van Agtmael maintains it’s a small shred of the whole. “Most stories will remain forever anonymous, and I’m very grateful to the W. Eugene Smith Grant for the opportunity to document the stories that would otherwise go unseen,” he says. Ive seen a nasty and primal side of mankind, but its been balanced by enough displays of extraordinary humanity to give me hope.”

The $30,000W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography is given once per year along with an additional$5000fellowship to a second recipient. blog comment . LightBox previously featured the work of 2011 Smith Grant Award winner Krisanne Johnson.

Almost Dawn in Libya: Exclusive Interactive Panorama

Almost Dawn in Libya, a collaborative project for which eight photographers raised money for four simultaneous Libyan exhibitions of photographs from the country’s conflict—as described here on LightBox—reached its fundraising goal of $40,000 and will be completed in the next few weeks. Photographer André Liohn, one of the guiding forces behind the initiative, spoke to LightBox from Misrata, Libya, where he was preparing for the installation in that city.

“That we finally have the pictures in our hands,” says Liohn, “is very exciting.”

Liohn estimates that they are about 80 percent done with printing the photographs for the shows, but the progress is dodged by remnants of the conflict that the exhibitions are intended to address. On the day before Liohn spoke to LightBox, militiamen seized control of the Tripoli airport. Elections are also on the horizon. It’s still unclear whether the other photographers who are part of the Almost Dawn project—Lynsey Addario, Eric Bouvet, Bryan Denton, Christopher Morris, Jehad Nga, Finbarr O’Reilly and Paolo Pellegrin—will have difficulty getting to Libya for the openings.

But, after everything endured by the photojournalists who captured the Libyan conflict on film, these obstacles are not overly daunting. Liohn says he’s ready to get the shows up and running, particularly because the people he meets in Libya are ready too. Despite—or perhaps because of—the trauma of war, they seem, to him, eager to help with the vision of healing through photography.

“We feel that the project is pretty much as much theirs as it’s ours,” says Liohn, citing the people who have donated both living space and expensive printing services. “To me, it’s very courageous that they are taking so much responsibility for making this happen.”

The Almost Dawn in Libya team has also provided LightBox with the panoramic view shown here, as designed by Paolo Pellegrin and curator Annalisa d’Angelo, which replicates the gallery set-up that will be seen in Libya. The lack of captions was part of the original vision for the project, meant to allow viewers to see past any divisions between Libyan regions and peoples. Although work remains to be done—unsurprisingly, considering the task of mounting four identical exhibitions across a still-scarred nation—the shows are expected to open in early July in four Libyan cities, Tripoli, Misurata, Benghazi and Zintan, with the goal of providing fodder for debate and discussion about the country’s future among those who come to see the photographs.

“They fear that Libya will not become a good country,” says Liohn. “Still they are not letting the fear keep them from making Libya into what they want.”

Learn more about Almost Dawn in Libya—and the photographers involved at their emphas.is fundraising page here.

Almost Dawn in Libya will be shown on the following schedule:

July 1 – Misurata – Goz-elteek-Hotel
July 4 – Benghazi – Benghazi Museum
July 10 – Tripoli – Dar Al Funnun  – Tripoli Art House
July 12 – Zintan – Zintan Media Center

You can also follow the exhibition’s progress at ADIL‘s Facebook page, here.

Winner: European Publishers Award for Photography 2012

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From The Garden Alessandro Imbriaco. Image courtesy of Dewi Lewis Publishing.

Italian photographer Alessandro Imbriaco is the winner of The European Publishers Award for Photography 2012. The Award was established in 1994 and celebrated its 19th year in 2012. Previous winners have included Bruce Gilden, Simon Norfolk, Jeff Mermelstein, Paolo Pellegrin, Jacob Aue Sobol, Ambroise Tzenas, Klavdij Sluban and Davide Monteleone.

The competition requires the submission of a substantial, completed and unpublished photographic book project. The winning project is then published in book form simultaneously by five European publishers and thus in five languages. Comcast Cable California . For several past winners the Award book has been their first publication and has proved to be of significant benefit in the development of their careers. Additionally, in recent years the winning photographer has had their work exhibited during the following Rencontres dArles.

The other shortlisted photographers for the 2012 Award were:

Luca Desienna My dearest Javanese concubine
Zoltn Jkay Mrs Raab wants to go home
Fernando Moleres Behind Bars. Juveniles in Sierra Leone Prisons
Kosuke Okahara Ibasyo
Guillaume Simoneau Love And War
Kurt Tong The Queen, the Chairman and I

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From The Garden Alessandro Imbriaco. Image courtesy Dewi Lewis Publishing.

Over the last five years Alessandro Imbriaco has been photographing issues around the housing problems in Rome. This led him to explore the peripheral and hidden spaces of the city.

The Garden is one of those places. XFINITY From Home . It is a small swamp under a flyover on the ring road circling the eastern outskirts of Rome a failed nature reserve that ended up protecting other living creatures: Angela, a six-year-old child, was born here and grew up here with her parents Piero, from Sicily, and Luba, from Russia.

Alessandro Imbriaco was born in Salerno, Italy, in 1980. He currently lives in Rome and works on both editorial and personal photographic projects. He has already won several awards the 2008 Canon Award for Young Photographers, World Press Photo 2010 Conteporary Issues 2nd prize stories, Premio Biennale Giovani Monza and Premio Pesaresi 2011. In 2011 he was selected for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass.

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From The Garden Alessandro Imbriaco. squido lense . Image courtesy Dewi Lewis Publishing.

The book will be published in Autumn 2012 by the five publishers

Actes Sud (France)
Blume (Spain)
Dewi Lewis Publishing (UK)
Kehrer Verlag (Germany)
Peliti Associati (Italy)

Delpire & Co., Opening Tonight



 

Delpire season is upon us.

Tonight Aperture Gallery launches the New York City run of Delpire & Co., opening their W27th street space to the public, showcasing a rich, multimedia exhibition celebrating the revered curator, editor, publisher, and overall champion of photography, Robert Delpire.
In the next several weeks, a comprehensive retrospective of Delpire’s career will be exhibited across four venues in New York City: Aperture Gallery, The Gallery at Hermès, Cultural Services of the French Embassy, and La Maison Française. Concurrent with Delpire & Co., Pace/MacGill and Howard Greenberg will have exhibitions on view in celebration of Robert Delpire’s life and work.

Here’s what you can expect to see throughout New York City:

 

Aperture Gallery


On view: May 9 through July 19

Highlights: Classical and seminal publications by now-iconic photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, William Klein, Robert Frank (see: “The Americans”), Josef Koudelka, and Sarah Moon. Delpire’s work with magazines will also be featured, including the very first issue of Neuf (founded by Robert Delpire at the ripe age of 23), and Nouvel Observateur Spécial Photo, as well as advertising projects for diverse clients from Cacharel, Citroën, L’Oréal, and the French Ministry of Culture.

 

Cultural Services of the French Embassy


On view: May 11 through June 6

Highlights: The embassy will be exhibiting the original French editions of beloved illustrator Maurice Sendak’s Where the Wild Things Are and Crocodile Tears.


The Gallery at Hermès/Fondation d’entreprise Hermès


On view: May 11 through July 19

Highlights: Robert Delpire’s famed Photo Poche series is on view, as well as prints from contemporary photographers such as Harry Gruyaert, Jehsong Baak, Michel Vanden Eeckhout, Michael Ackerman, Francesco Zizola, Raymond Depardon, Robert Doisneau, Paolo Pellegrin, Marc Riboud.

 

La Maison Française of New York University


On view: May 18 through July 19

Highlights: This exhibition focuses on the Poche Illustrateur series, celebrating notable illustrators such as Roman Cieślewicz, Honoré Daumier, Etienne Delessert, Guy Peellaert, and Saul Steinberg.

 

› In addition, two supporting exhibitions will be on view; Sarah Moon at Howard Greenberg Gallery, featuring new work, and Pace/MacGill Gallery will exhibit works by prominent photographers such as Robert Frank, Josef Koudelka, Duane Michals, Paolo Roversi, and Alfred Stieglitz.

Visual Supplement: This week in the magazine The New Yorker ran photographs by Sarah Moon and Lee Freidlander, both of which are part of exhibitions celebrating the work of Delpire. Online, The New Yorker presents a stunning and concise slideshow summary of books and photographs from among the displays at Aperture, Hermès, Pace/MacGill, and Howard Greenberg.

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Delpire & Co. is coproduced by Rencontres d’Arles, la Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Delpire Editeur, and Aperture Foundation.Delpire & Co. has been made possible with the support of the National Endowment for the Arts, Fondation d’entreprise Hermès, Etant donnés: The French-American Fund for Contemporary Art, the E.T. Harmax Foundation, and with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Postcards From America: The Box Set

In May 2011, Magnum photographers Jim Goldberg, Susan Meiselas, Paolo Pellegrin, Alec Soth and Mikhael Subotzky, as well as writer Ginger Strand, set out from Austin, Texas in an RV. Two weeks and 1750 miles later, they arrived in Oakland, Calif.

Together, they documented their experience, the result of which is a new, limited edition book that launches this week. Postcards from America is a collection of objects: a book, five bumper stickers, a newspaper, two fold-outs, three cards, a poster and five zines, all in a signed and numbered box.

“We knew each other through Magnum, obviously, but we’d never actually tried to work together,” says Soth. “We wanted to see what that would be like, to see if we could create a kind of polyphonic sound. Hopefully the box book achieves that. It also gave us an opportunity to push each other creatively and conceptually, which I think has carried over into our individual work.”

The book does not attempt to document the American Southwest in y traditional sense. Instead, it uses the prototypically western experience of a road trip as an entry point into depicting the region. “Some of us are used to working only on immersive, multiyear projects,” says Subotzky. “Obviously this was very different. Doing it collectively brought a great energy and looseness to the work. The box, with all its moving and arrangeable pieces, really reflects that and reflects what we found on the road—a divided and often contradictory society, unsure about its identity and future.”

The Postcards from America box book, in a signed edition of 500, is available exclusively at www.postcards.magnumphotos.com 

The second Postcards from America project is scheduled to begin this April in Rochester, New York.

To read more about the project background on Lightbox click here. To read a dispatch from the project click here.