Tag Archives: Ongoing Project

‘Barbarella’ at 45: David Hurn’s Iconic Images of Jane Fonda

A member of Magnum since 1965, David Hurn had been photographing behind the scenes on films for years in the 1960sincluding the Beatles’A Hard Day’s Nightand the first four James Bond filmswhen he was asked to take pictures for the 1968 sci-fi cult classic Barbarella.

Forty-five years after snapping the enduring images of the film’s daring star, Jane Fonda, the photos continue to send their legendary photographer checks in the mail and thus fund his ongoing project documenting the changing lives and landscapes of his home country of Wales.

During production in 1967 in Rome, however, Fonda had become a challenge for photographers, rejecting so many frames that few were left to promote the film in magazines, Hurn said.Once he got on set, he discovered the famously beautiful Fonda was insecure about her looks.”She actually said to me, ‘I feel like a squirrel with one cheek full of nuts, … Anyway I managed to get her to laugh a lot and we then became very good friends,” he said.

Hurn exposed about 500 rolls of film over the course of a month.His most published images from the assignment were a fashion-inspired series of Fonda in her costumes against a white background. A dedicated and agile athlete long before her fame as a workout guru, Fonda was a natural at the kicks, squats and stretches Hurn captured.

At about 6 o’clock in the morning there’d she be cavorting around with a foot behind her neck sort of thing. So it was comparatively easy to do shots of her in the various costumes with very exaggerated poses and things which was exactly right for what was after all a comic strip, Hurn said.

The photographer enjoyed his time on Barbarella and felt well-treated by the director, Fonda’s husband, Roger Vadim, but the project was not without its annoyances and hiccups. For one,Hurn grew tired of Vadim and his entourage talking about free love.”It seems to me if you want to get your pants off, get your pants off, but not try to justify it by some theory, you know,” Hurn said.And then, a week into the gig Hurn’s cameras, including Leicas, were stolen. They reappeared two days later, however, replaced in a secret act of generosity by Fonda.

Hurn remained friends with Fonda after Barbarella, photographing her at her country house, her and Vadim’s next film Spirits of the Dead and later director Joseph Losey’s A Doll’s House in 1972.

Today Hurn, who is also a renown educator, is at work on several projects including a third book about Wales, where he’s been living and photographing since leaving behind the expensive glamor of London in 1970. He’s planning a project detailing life in his 400-person village for his final five years. But he’s not rushing into it.

I have had a blissful life, he said. I always puzzle when people sort of grumble about their lives. article writing submission . I really, really enjoyed my life and I’m clinging on desperately. They’re going to have to really drag me! I think life’s so pleasant and can be so funny, so, so funny.

Nude in New York: Photo Self-Portraits by Erica Simone

Web Design Worcester .

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Deli on Varick Erica Simone, from the series Nue York: Self-Portraits of a Bare Urban Citizen

It is not uncommon for people to have nightmares in which they dream they are stark naked out on a crowded city street. Photographer Erica Simone decided to create a series of nude self-portraits at locations throughout New York City to discover for herself, “What would the world feel like, naked?” She seems to have enjoyed the experience, and it has become an ongoing project.

Read and see more (including a high-resolution slide show) here in Lens Culture.

Dan Shepherd

I’m always happy when good things happen to good people and Dan Shepherd is at the top of that list.  Dan recently opened a solo exhibition, Blinded by Science, at the DNJ Gallery in Santa Monica, running through July 21st. His large, beautiful and layered prints are at once painterly and rich with photographic textures and concepts. Dan is a vital force in the Los Angeles photography community, extending his good will and good sense to pursuits such as The Open Show series which brings the Los Angeles photography community together to share work on a regular basis and is a founding member of the f/9 Photography Collective.
Raised in the Pacific Northwest, Dan spent a number of creative years in New York City and now lives and works in Los
Angeles. He navigates between the visual arts and
working for conservation organizations. Dan has a Masters in
Environmental Science from Columbia University and an International
Diploma in Plant Conservation from the Royal Botanic Garden, Kew in
England, as well as a BA in Japanese from the University of Oregon. He has been well published and exhibited.

BLINDED BY SCIENCE: Some say ignorance is bliss. As a former botanical professional, a walk through a garden can be a challenge to just enjoy the colors, shapes and textures when your brain is clouded with lots of scientific plant details. With the ongoing project Blinded by Science, I am using the power of abstraction to create images of plants and trees from some of my favorite locations which helps me filter out the science details and lets me focus on the pure beauty of nature. 

 Our interaction with the natural world has been an ongoing thread to my life. This theme continues to weave in and out of both my professional and artistic endeavors. My path to photography comes from a love of drawing & painting combined with a conceptual approach to science and nature.

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong

Mom Applying Make-Up,
Clinton, Connecticut, 2011
From the Two Roofs series
Website – TonyLuong.com

Tony Luong was born in Connecticut in 1987. His family moved to the United States two years before he was born to escape the Vietnam war. He graduated with a BFA in photography from the New England Institute of Art in 2010. His work mainly revolves around his family's background and what it means to be a first generation citizen. His work has been exhibited throughout Boston and through several online publications. His editorial work has appeared in publications such as Hemispheres Magazine, Financial Times, London and Vibe Magazine, among others. He recently published a small book of photographs from his ongoing project Two Roofs. Tony lives in Cambridge, MA where he is a freelance editorial and fine art photographer.

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong

Mom Applying Make-Up,
Clinton, Connecticut, 2011
From the Two Roofs series
Website – TonyLuong.com

Tony Luong was born in Connecticut in 1987. His family moved to the United States two years before he was born to escape the Vietnam war. He graduated with a BFA in photography from the New England Institute of Art in 2010. His work mainly revolves around his family's background and what it means to be a first generation citizen. His work has been exhibited throughout Boston and through several online publications. His editorial work has appeared in publications such as Hemispheres Magazine, Financial Times, London and Vibe Magazine, among others. He recently published a small book of photographs from his ongoing project Two Roofs. Tony lives in Cambridge, MA where he is a freelance editorial and fine art photographer.

Photographer #449: Miti Ruangkritya

Miti Ruangkritya, 1981, Thailand, studied Photojournalism at the University of Westminster. His work is mainly documentary based yet he tries not to restrict himself in any way. He is currently working on an ongoing project that consists of a polaroid installation placed on the beach of Nongkhai in Thailand. A dining table displays the polaroids without placeholders, inviting the viewers to pick up the images and be involved. By adding mattresses and swimming rings he wants to create a relaxed atmosphere for the audience to enjoy the work outside of a typical gallery exhibition. In his series On the Edge he took a closer look at Siem Reap, a city he had visited in 1991 when there was only one hotel and one bar. Today the city has massively exploded in size consisting of 5 star hotels, restaurants and bars. Miti viewed the city from a distance “from the vantage point of someone approaching (or perhaps momentarily escaping) the city.” His work has been exhibited in London, Paris and Thailand and his portfolio will be featured in the May 2012 edition of the British Journal of Photography. The following images come from the series Imagining Flood, Northern Route and On the Edge.


Website: www.mi-ti.com

Misha Friedman

After I discovered Misha Friedman’s photographs on The Forward Thinking Museum’s website, I began to see his name everywhere. Misha is the FTM’s winner of their first quarter 2011 photography contest, as the JGS Annual Artist and recipient of a $15,000 award. His series, Donbass Romanticism, was singled out for its unflinching look at coal mines and abandoned factories and their effects on the health of the residents of Donetsk Oblast, a heavily industrialized region in eastern Ukraine.

Misha’s series, Tuberculosis in the former Soviet Union, appeared on the NY Times Lens blog last week. Some of his awards and grants include Picture of the Year Int’l (POYi), PDN 30, Photolucida Critical Mass Top 50, and Magenta Flash Forward. Born in Moldova, Misha now lives in New York City, but continues to make work in Eastern Europe.

Donbass Romanticism: In the second half of the 18th century romantics revolted against the Industrial revolution in Europe – against rationalization of nature, against social and political norms. In art, a viewer once again was allowed to use his emotions and imagination. Inspired by German and French Romanticism, this ongoing project from Ukraine is my attempt to show how Nature and Man have learned to live within the industrial complex.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, much of Eastern Ukraine ended up ruined – many mines and massive factories are lying abandoned, people are unemployed or earn just enough to survive – abandoned by the government – and nature is taking over in full force. For decades this land was a symbol of Soviet Rationalism and victory over Nature, but it did not take long for all of that to crumble, leaving behind ruined lives.

Celebrate Japan’s White Day with Joseph Maida

Joseph Maida, an American photographer who has been working on a Japan-based project since 2007, was in a department store in Kyoto when he first saw the little plastic miniatures of Western consumer goods. The toys sparked nostalgia but were clearly not the product of his own culture. “On the surface they seem completely Western,” he says, “but at their core they’re actually based on something Japanese.”

That collision formed the basis for his ongoing project, selections from which are featured in the gallery above. The series, Dream Factory, is his take on how Western culture is filtered through Japanese culture. The simplest example of the phenomenon, he says, is in the country’s food, where a dish can look like hamburgers or spaghetti but cater to the taste buds of a Japanese palate. Other instances, such as the scene of a woman playing a keyboard in what looks like a glass bubble (shown above), are subtler, as they require the viewer to think about a Japanese instrument based on a European instrument, played during a Japanese winter festival that uses Western ideas of what a “winter wonderland” should look like.

Joseph Maida

Locked Heart (Osaka)

And another example will be on view tomorrow, March 14, when, all across Japan, men will present women with gifts: chocolates, candies, lingerie. That’s because tomorrow is White Day, a Japanese holiday that exists to counterbalance Valentine’s Day, celebrated a month earlier. First women give, then men give. First red, then white. First one gift and then another. Both Valentine’s Day and White Day are widely observed in relationships of both romance and respect, with distinction made between gifts of love and gifts of obligation. It’s a particularly Japanese twist on the common February holiday that was imported from the West, a way to make America’s Hallmark holiday fit in with the Japanese concept of Okaeshi, the social rule that requires one who receives to subsequently give.

“I’m interested in this tension between what has been traditionally understood as Japanese and is still taught to young people,” Maida says, “but then how you make sense of that in a culture that has been oversaturated with Western material culture.”

Maida says that he isn’t trying to understand Japanese attitudes toward Japanese life, but that the backdrop of Japan has proved to be a rich source of introspection about his own Western culture. At the same time, he says that much of the research he did about Japan was out-of-date or full of misconceptions, and that the pervasive nature of Western culture may be to blame. But a day like White Day can put the juxtaposition into focus.

“Visual confusion is easily misread,” he says. “What’s really fascinating is the way that Japan is able to bring in so many outside influences and take what’s maybe the best parts of them or the most beautiful parts of them or the most useful parts of them and celebrate those aspects, while not being bombarded by the aspects that they’re a little less interested in.”

Joseph Maida is a photographer based in New York City. See more of his work here.