Tag Archives: Norway

Finding Beauty: Fractal Patterns on Earth as Seen from Space

In a world made small and accessible by technology, it is easy to forget the magnitude of nature’s infinite complexity. But sometimes technology reminds us, such as when trawling planet Earth on Google’s Satellite View, zooming across landscapes partitioned by natural and unnatural boundaries.

While searching Google Earth, Paul Bourke, a research associate professor at the University of Western Australia, discovered an amazing sightthe patterns of the Earth seemed to form a delicate geometric pattern when viewed from the sky. Not only delicate, but almost perfect. Bourke was captivated by the geographylacy tracks of rivers and mountain ranges stretching across the Earth in unison as if digitally cloned.

Fractals are recognized as patterns of self-similarity over varying degrees of scale. seo marketing . There are both mathematical fractals as well as natural fractalsthe former are idealized and found across a range of scales, while the latter generally only exist across a smaller scale range.

Bourke explains that fractals are found in all parts of life, from the brain sciences and astrophysics to geographic formations and riverbeds. “Fractal and chaotic processes are the norm, not the exception.”

“I always knew these amazing natural patterns would be there,” he said. “They are literally everywhereit’s just a matter of finding them.”

And find them he did. Bourke, an authority on fractals and visualizations, showcases more than 40 different fractals he’s uncovered while zooming through the satellite views of 25 countries. Through his website, he encourages users to submit examples they’ve found in their own browsing, and provides KMZ coordinate files for each image, allowing users to visit the exact views of the fractal features. Bourke’s collection realizes the power enabled by the open-ended tools of modern technology and applies them to a practical and popular aesthetic end.

To see more natural fractal patterns, visit Bourke’s website.

Tearsheet of The Day | 26 June 2012

Newsweek posted Andrea Gjestvang’s portraits of survivors of the 2011 Norway attacks yesterday on their website. The series is printed in the latest Newsweek Int’l (2-8 July 2012 issue) which I received through the door this morning.

It’s interesting to note that all the text is by photographer Gjestvang herself. I’ve noticed Newsweek print  photo essays quite regularly just with the photographer’s, usually rather short, text and no other reporting (What text you see in the tearsheet below, is more than average I’d say). I don’t remember seeing any photo features for instance in Time magazine that wouldn’t have text by a reporter. That being said, it would appear all of these features in Newsweek have been bought rather than assigned. In any case, I think it’s terrific Newsweek print these stories. I love good reporting and great photography combined, which especially Time do so well,  but it’s nice if there are outlets for photo-led pieces also in these major current affairs publications. And if there’s little text to such photo heavy pieces, it’s actually great to get the first hand account to the images by the photographer him/herself.

In a recent interview with B&H’s Insights blog, Gjestvang briefly mentioned this project and said it was the first time she was working in 5×4. The photos seen here are part of a larger project to be published as a book later this year.

Newsweek (Int’l ed) 2-8 July 2012 issue. Pages 30-31. Photos © Andrea Gjestvang

Newsweek (Int’l ed) 2-8 July 2012 issue. Pages 32-33. Photos © Andrea Gjestvang

Newsweek (Int’l ed) 2-8 July 2012 issue. Pages 34-35. Photos © Andrea Gjestvang

Andrea Gjestvang (b. 1981, Norway) is a Norwegian photographer based between Oslo and Berlin. In 2010, she took part in the Joop Swart Masterclass. In 2012, Gjestvang was chosen in the PDN30. She is represented by Moment Agency.

Pictures of the Week: June 15 – 22

From Aung San Suu Kyi’s Nobel lecture in Norway and the death of Rodney King in California to violent mining strikes in Spain and a New Democracy in Greece, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

Photographer #450: Sølve Sundsbø

Sølve Sundsbø, 1970, Norway, is a fashion photographer and director based in London since 1995 where he studied at the London College of Printing. While studying he assisted world renowned photographer Nick Knight, who became an important mentor to him. Today Sølve is one of the leading photographers in his genre. Among his clients are big names as Yves Saint Laurent, Louis Vuitton, Cartier and Gucci. He created editorials for the Italian Vogue, i-D and Interview. His series 14 Actors Acting, made for The New York Times, received an Emmy Award in 2011 for New Approaches to News & Documentary Programming: Arts, Lifestyle and Culture. Solve has an experimental approach to his photography, using a vast amount of techniques and styles, creating larger-than-life, sophisticated and innovative images. He is not afraid to tread uncommon paths. For an YSL fragrance campaign he convinced them to create and use an image of a full-frontal male nude, causing some controversy. The following images come from Interview Magazine: Scarlett Johansson, Vogue Japan: The Virgin Spring and W Magazine: The Everchanging Face of Beauty.

Website: www.artandcommerce.com/ss & www.solvesundsbo.info

Andrew Meredith, Vardo, Norway

Andrew Meredith, Vardo, Norway

Andrew Meredith

Vardo, Norway,
, 2011
Website – MeredithPhoto.com

Andrew Meredith graduated from Falmouth College of Arts and has, for the past decade, been shooting commercial, editorial and personal projects. In 2008 his personal work was awarded as a category winner in the Creative Review Photography Annual and following up in 2009 receiving the Best In Book award for his Slaughtermen series, depicting the brutal and gory world of the abattoir worker. In the same year Andrew was awarded category winner for his Model Village series. His first solo exhibition, Excursions, images of south american wanderings, was shown in London in 2010 at Riverside Studios and then during the Photomonth festival at Truman Brewery Gallery. In 2011 Andrew was commissioned by Icon magazine to document the Steilneset Witch Memorial by Peter Zumthor in the most northerly town in mainland Eurpoe, Vardo, Norway, deep into the arctic circle. His work has been published worldwide. He lives and works in London.
 

TIME Picks the Most Surprising Photos of 2011

The year 2011 brought us dramatic and unexpected images from some of the world’s major news events, including the devastating earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan, the violent end of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi’s rule and the humiliating tweet that ruined New York Representative Anthony Weiner’s career. But beyond the widely seen and iconic images that accompanied the year’s biggest events, like the death of Osama bin Laden and the shooting of Arizona Representative Gabrielle Giffords, were unusual, equally astonishing and startling images that rested at the periphery of the news. A cat with two faces, rail tracks buckled by the shifting earth after a quake in New Zealand, the police rescue of a girl held hostage by her father, a suicidal bride and beautiful, abstract images taken from space by an astronaut photographer — these are just a few of the compelling and surprising images to have emerged beyond the main news cycle this year. Here, LightBox looks back at a small selection of the underreported, improbable and astounding images that caught the attention of TIME’s photo editors.

Norway’s Northern Lights

A riot of color in the night sky above the Arctic Circle gave local photographers a spectacular light show this September. Sometimes called the aurora borealis, the northern lights are caused by streams of particle-charged solar winds that hit the Earth’s magnetic field, causing hues of green and pink to shimmer against the backdrop of the stars. This year, professional and amateur photographers were able to capture the lights in more southerly latitudes than usual. Herewith, a small sampling of what they saw.