Tag Archives: New York University

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren

Running 005824,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

Lydia Panas, Maria + Corinne

Lydia Panas, Maria + Corinne

Lydia Panas

Maria + Corinne,
Kutztown, Pennsylvania, 2012
Website – LydiaPanas.com

Lydia Panas is an award-winning photographer whose work has been exhibited widely throughout the United States and abroad, and has won numerous awards. She was one of nine International Discoveries, Houston Fotofest in 2007. Her work is included in numerous collections, including Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Brooklyn Museum, and Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago. Lydia has degrees from Boston College, the School of Visual Arts, New York University/International Center of Photography, as well as an Independent Study Fellowship from the Whitney Museum of American Art. Lydia has taught photography at a number of institutions, including The Museum of Modern Art, Lafayette, Muhlenberg and Moravian Colleges, Kutztown University, The Maine Media Workshops, The Vermont College MFA program, and the Baum School of Art/Lehigh Carbon Community College.

Recording Modernism: The Work of Ezra Stoller

If modernism sought to give us Le Corbusiers machine for living in, photographer Ezra Stoller, who died in 2004, used the camera as a machine for living through. His work was not only so comprehensive that it documented modernisms rise, but was a part of the modernist movement itself. Now, a new book Ezra Stoller, Photographer aims to showcase both the images that made him famous, and those that tend to get less exposure. Co-authored by his daughter Erica Stoller, who manages Esto, the photographic agency he founded in 1966, and architectural writer Nina Rappaport, the tome presents Stoller’s iconic images alongside lesser known industrial photography that has a strikingly different focus from his shots of buildings alone.

Ezra Stoller Esto. Photo: Peter Aaron

Portrait of Ezra Stoller with slide glasses, circa 1975.

Like the spaces he captured, his work is clean, simple and elegant. In one frame Stoller could distill the essence of a structure, as if he knew how to perfect the architects dream. His shots of Eero Saarinens TWA terminal at John F. Kennedy Airport, for example, seem both fluid and solid at oncea feeling often hard to experience in the building itself. squido lense . Stoller was known for being meticulous, pedantic even. With large format cameras, a Deardorff in the 1930s and 1940s and a Sinar in the 1950s and 1960s, as we learn from the book, he would reportedly stay in spaces for days before he photographed, and would often turn up to shoot just after a building was finished. Among architects, his name was used as a verb; to have a design Stollerized was seen as a great honor. Indeed, his client list reads like a whos who of mid 20th Century architecture: Frank Lloyd Wright, Philip Johnson and Louis Kahn, to name but a few.

It may come as a surprise, then, to learn that Stoller didnt consider himself an artist. Trained as an industrial designer at New York University, Stoller came into the workforce during the Great Depression, a factor that saw him eschew a design career for one behind the camera, a discipline he had no education in. A move perhaps stemming from his token perfectionism: he didnt have too many industry-related connections and hated the idea of working for another architect. He saw photography as a practical way to excel.

Ezra Stoller Esto

Fortune Magazine Cover, Jan. 1947.

He decided that this was going to be the medium that he could best speak about architecture, Erica Stoller says. By moving to the side he felt that he could contribute more. He got to be involved with architects making decisions, she adds.

Sometimes projects for magazines such as Fortune, other times commissions for companies such as IBM, Stoller’s lesser-known images are part social realism, part modernist idealism. In these posed shots we see the working man as hero, the working woman as heroine, and both at the center of the industrialist dream. They are optimistic, sharp, beautiful, and they show us the true breadth of his work: he was not just an architectural photographer but an industrial and portrait photographer too. They are images of industry in America, and he is really focused on the worker in motion, Rappaport says. This was all post-war. It was a time of prosperity, and he really captures this.

Ezra Stoller, Photographer will be published by Yale University Press on Nov. 19.

Robert Herman: The New Yorkers

Brooklyn born photographer, Robert Herman began working as an usher at a movie theater owned
by his parents. The exposure to a wide range of films during his formative
years provided him with a unique vision: “Working for my father allowed me to
view the same movie repeatedly,” he recalls, “until the story line began to
recede and the images became independent of the narrative.” 



Robert received a BFA in film making from the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and received his Masters in Digital Photography from the School of Visual Arts in NYC.  Later as a production still photographer on
independent feature films, Herman discovered the life at the periphery of film
locations was more compelling than the film sets. His book of his NYC color street photographs, The New Yorkers, to be self-published in the fall of 2013 with help from a successful Kickstarter campaign. His is currently also working with Fractured Atlas to defray additional costs and accepting additional tax deductible donations.
His work is part of the permanent collections of the George
Eastman House and the Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA. His photographs are also
in many private collections and has exhibited across the United States including
the Museum of Modern Art, the galleries of the Savannah College of Art &
Design, The Los Angeles Center for Digital Art and The Henry Gregg Gallery in
DUMBO. This spring, photographs from The
New Yorkers
were included in a traveling exhibition that originated at the
Istanbul Photography Museum, and then moved to Ankara, Turkey with more venues
to be announced in the coming months.

The New Yorkers

New
York City is like a diamond mine. The pressure will turn one into coal dust or
a multi-faceted jewel. To survive with some sort of evolving grace, it is
absolutely essential to cultivate a Zen-like awareness. Consciously choosing to
be in a state of openness is also useful for making photographs. To paraphrase
the art critic John Berger: A photograph that surprises the photographer when
he makes it, in turn surprises the viewer. No matter how hardened and cynical
one becomes, the act of taking a picture, forces one to try to return to an
innocent wonder. Every time I go out to make photographs, I ask myself this
question: Can I see the world with vulnerability and clarity?

The
New Yorkers is a body of work that I began when I was still a student at NYU,
when I was learning to be a photographer. I was living in Little Italy at the
time and everyone around me seemed to be a subject: the man who changed tires,
the superintendent of the building next door.  I discovered Harry Callahan’s magnificent book: Color and
Robert Frank’s The Americans. These images opened my mind to what a strong
photograph could be. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then this
was my starting point. Both of these photographers re-made the mundane, the
ordinary and the everyday and transformed them into small and transcendent
jewels.

Over
the years, I lived in several different apartments and I continued making pictures
in whatever neighborhood I happened to be living in. Becoming comfortable in my
new surroundings would ease the way for me to make the authentic photographs I
was seeking. Key to this body of work was letting the subject matter determine
the outcome. I would make myself available, allowing my intuition to be my guide
and let the content rise to the surface. The true epiphany was not to embellish
or to judge: with the removal of the internal impediment strong subject matter
would speak for itself. Like a man searching for water in the desert with a
dousing rod, I became a vessel and allowed the images to pass through me onto
the film.

As an illustration of this, “Eldorado” was made
on a day when I was sitting around my loft with my girl friend at the time when
suddenly I said, “ I’ll be right back, I have to go out and take some
pictures.” Ann nodded her ascent and with my Nikon F in hand, I walked around
the corner onto Mulberry Street. 
In the bright afternoon sun two luxury cars were parked angling in from
the street towards a large green garage door. I chose my framing just as two
boys walked into the shot and I made my picture.  I was back at home five minutes later and knew I had captured
something truly special. I was at a loss to explain what had just happened. It
was truly a mystery. I realized that if I were wiling to relinquish some
control, I would occasionally be rewarded with strong photographs.
I went out to search for water
in order to survive, and I was led to something shining down from the sky
and bubbling
up from the ground.

There
is synchronicity and coincidence present everywhere. Photographs are a way of
revealing hidden relationships that are only present for a moment in space and
time, seen from a unique vantage point. The New Yorkers is the record of my
self-discovery as a photographer, inside and out, manifested on the streets of
New York City.

Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren

Running 004907,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

Sara Macel, Plane Over Baton Rouge

Sara Macel, Plane Over Baton Rouge

Sara Macel

Plane Over Baton Rouge,
Baton Rogue, Louisiana, 2011
From the May the Road Rise to Meet You series
Website – SaraMacel.com

Sara Macel received her B.F.A. in Photography and Imaging from New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts in 2003, and her MFA. in Photography, Video, & Related Media from the School of Visual Arts in 2011. Her work has been widely exhibited, including at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York; Center for Photography at Woodstock, New York; Jen Bekman Gallery, New York; and Kris Graves Projects, New York. She has received numerous awards, including winner in the 2011 Magenta Foundation Flash Forward competition, Top 50 Photographer in Photolucida’s Critical Mass Award, finalist in FotoVisura Spotlight Awards, best in show at Photobook 2012! at Davis Orton Gallery in Hudson, NY and was recently named a winner in the New York Photo Festival Invitational for her self-published monograph May the Road Rise to Meet You. The book will also be on display in fall 2012 exhibitions at the Cleveland Museum of Art and Gallery Carte Blanche in San Francisco. Her work is in various private collections, including the Harry Ransom Center and the Center of Photography at Woodstock. Sara currently teaches photography at Rockland Community College.

Joni Sternbach, 07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty

Joni Sternbach, 07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty

Joni Sternbach

07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty,
Montauk, New York, 2007
From the SurfLand series
Website – JoniSternbach.com

Joni Sternbach was born in the Bronx, New York. She graduated from New York University/International Center of Photography (ICP) with an M.A. in Photography in 1987. She was part of the adjunct faculty at NYU for over 20 years, and is currently a faculty member at ICP and CAP workshops teaching wet plate collodion. Sternbach uses early photographic processes to create contemporary landscapes and seascapes. Her photography has taken her to some of the most desolate deserts in the American West to some of the most prized surf beaches in the world. Her solo exhibition, SurfLand, which captures portraits of surfers in tintype, has exhibited at the Peabody Essex Museum and Blue Sky Gallery and will be on view at the Southeast Museum of Photography in 2012. A monograph of the SurfLand images was published by Photolucida in 2009. She is represented by Rick Wester Fine Art in New York City and Edward Cella Art and Architecture in Los Angeles.

Paris: 5-day Photography Masterclass w/ Jeff Cowen & Jim Casper

304882_10151059797002368_1558745395_n.jpg

Anonymous, Berlin, 2007 © Jeff Cowen

SUMMARY

Location: Central Paris, France
Dates: October 18-22, 2012
Fee: 9900 NOK
Limit: 15 photographers
Full details (in Norwegian and English): Bilder Nordic School of Photography

ABOUT THE MASTERCLASS

This masterclass will be a 5 day marathon for photographers interested in making a significant vertical leap in their work. It is geared to fine art photography and reportage as art.

This masterclass is coordinated by Bilder Nordic School of Photography in Oslo, Norway, in partnership with Lens Culture in Paris, France.

– The class will emphasize shooting, editing and the final print. Shooting will take place in central Paris and in the studio. Students will have the opportunity to work with street photography, the nude, still life, and abstraction during the course of the class. There will also be group visits to some photography-based cultural institutions throughout Paris.

– Class members will be expected to bring a body of work in progress to be discussed by the group. Each participant will also receive one-on-one consultations with Jim Casper and Jeff Cowen.

– Mr. Cowen will stress how digital photographers can learn to use new technology while respecting the tradition of analogue-based photography and its position as a medium with respect to art history.

– Career possibilities in photography and the artist’s path will also be topics for discussion. This class offers a unique perspective to create a dialogue with a working artist and an international photography critic, publisher and lecturer.

ABOUT JEFF COWEN

jeff-cowen-portrait-casper.jpg
Jeff Cowen is a New York University honors scholar in Oriental studies. 25 years ago he was the assistant of Ralph Gibson and Larry Clark. His early street photography in New York City and his reportage work of the Romanian Revolution is in numerous collections and has been shown in Museums such as The Filature in Mulhouse and the New York Historical Society Museum.

Mr. Cowen is known for his painterly style. He works with the figure, landscape, abstraction and still life. He is represented by several leading galleries and his work is in over one hundred collections and institutions. His first monograph was published by Paris-Musée, and his galleries have produced books for his many solo shows around the world.

He participates regularly in art fairs such as Art Basel, Art Cologne, Art Bolonga, Arco, Photo Espana, LaArt Fair, Art Paris and others. In the fall 2012, his work will be exhibited at the Grand Palais in Paris in a special museum exhibition by the Huis Marseille Photography Museum during Paris Photo and the Month of Photography.

ABOUT JIM CASPER

Jim Casper is the founder and director of Lens Culture, an international organization dedicated to the celebration and promotion of contemporary photography in all of its forms.

Lens Culture publishes one of the most popular online magazines about global contemporary photography (www.lensculture.com), and organizes the yearly Lens Culture International Exposure Awards (www.lensculture.com/awards), and the annual Lens Culture FotoFest Paris international portfolio reviews (www.fotofest-paris.com) in partnership with Paris Photo and FotoFest International, in the USA.

Casper is a curator, writer, publisher and lecturer. He also serves on juries around the world.

APPLICATION/REQUIREMENTS:

Requirements: This course is open to all serious photographers. Digital printing equipment will be available for all participants. If you choose to work with film, we have arranged for professional lab film processing, contact sheets and digital scanning (you must pay extra for the lab work). We do not have a full darkroom available, so we will focus on digital printing for this purposes of this workshop.

Equipment: Bring your own camera, and a laptop if possible.

Price: NOK 9900,- (Maximum 15 persons. Material costs, travel and stay is not included.)

Conditions: Before signing up, please read the conditions and agreement carefully.

How to register: Sign up here.

THE WORKSHOP WILL BE HELD IN ENGLISH.