Tag Archives: New York Times

Jesse Chehak, Untitled

Jesse Chehak, Untitled

Jesse Chehak

Untitled,
Hartford, Connecticut, 2012
Website – JesseChehak.com

Born in Tarzana, California, Jesse Chehak studied photography and Art History at Sarah Lawrence College and is currently pursuing a MFA at the University of Arizona. Chehak has exhibited his large format prints in galleries and project spaces including Bruce Silverstein (New York), Danese (New York) and the Durham Art Guild (Durham, North Carolina.) He is currently seeking funding to publish his first monograph, Fool's Gold, and a gallery to exhibit and distribute the completed print edition. In 2005, Chehak joined M.A.P. and began executing commercial campaigns and editorial features for clients, including The New York Times, Wallpaper*, Newsweek, GQ, Ogilvy & Mather, Saatchi & Saatchi, Digitas, and others. Chehak has received notable attention for his work, including PDN30 in 2005, The Magenta Foundation's Flash Forward in 2007, a Baum Nomination in 2008, and AP25. He lives in Tucson and Los Angeles.

Eric Breitenbach

Today, and leading up to and after November 6th, LENSCRATCH will be featuring work that looks at our election process. 

We start today with work by Eric Breitenbach, who has created a series, Election 2012.

Eric  has been a still photographer for over thirty years and a filmmaker for more than fifteen.

His still photographs have appeared in such publications as The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, Details, Doubletake, Information Week, Labor’s Heritage, Essence, and Orlando magazines. He has exhibited widely. In 2012 he had solo exhibitions of his photography at The Third Eye Gallery in Varanasi, India, and at Florida School of The Arts in Palatka, Florida. Eric Breitenbach is also a Senior Professor at The Southeast Center For Photographic Studies at Daytona State College, teaching courses in photography, film, and video.

ELECTION 2012 
 For as long as I’ve been a photographer I’ve been compelled to make pictures of people. My goal is to discover something universal about a person—something viewers can recognize and even identify with. The trick is to then depict that successfully in a photograph. In early 2011, as events surrounding the 2012 presidential election began to unfold, like many Americans I was astonished at the heat of the political rhetoric. It seemed as if angry extremists were running the show.

Dismayed but still curious, I began to attend and photograph campaign rallies, political conventions, memorial services, group meetings, demonstrations, festivals, and other politically relevant events. There were thousands at the largest of these, sometimes less than a dozen at the smallest.

My goal wasn’t to document or explain anything; that, I think, is best left to the journalists. 

I set out with my usual strategy in mind—to attend, observe and make photographs. The role may be considered to be like that of an explorer, a finder and provider of artifacts that might one day be useful in comprehending, in this case, the cultural, social, and political mindset of 2012 America.

Witness, a film on HBO tomorrow night

I happened to be in a hotel room in Colorado, watching The Bang Bang Club when I received an e-mail about a 4-part movie presented on HBO tomorrow night. Links backlinks blog comments .  


Witness: Juarez, a four-part documentary series from award-winning filmmaker Michael Mann debuts this Monday, November 5th at 9:00p.m.ET/PT. The film follows combat photographer Eros Hoagland as he explores Juarez, Mexico, the “murder capital of the world” where drug violence has left over 10,000 dead.

Presented in four parts  JuarezLibyaSouth Sudan and Rio  Witness focuses on three determined photojournalists: Eros Hoagland, who explores the gang- and drug-related violence in both Juarez, Mexico and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Michael Christopher Brown, who chronicles escalating ethnic tensions in the wake of Muammar Gaddafis ouster last year in Libya; and Vronique de Viguerie, who follows the Arrow Boys and their struggle against General Kony in South Sudan. Between these three, their photos have appeared in TimeNewsweekThe New York TimesThe AtlanticParis MatchThe Guardian and many other publications.

Guillaume Grasset: California Dreamin’

Imagine arriving in Los Angeles at the age of 20, fresh off the plane from a childhood in Paris and looking to break into the photo world, packing a suitcase full of visual references that come from the created realities of Hollywood.  Guillaume Grasset did just that, and turned his camera onto a state capturing a smorgasbord of images that are far from those on the flickering screen. Guillaume has just opened California Dreamin’ at the Carte Blanche Gallery in San Francisco, an exhibition that will run through November 28th.
Guillaume cut his photographic teeth working with Herb Ritts, LaChapelle, Lindbergh, Steven Klein, Craig Mc Dean, Sante
d’Orazio, Michel Addi on fashion stories for Vogue, and François-Marie
Banier on portraits for New York Times. In 2000, he returned to Paris to start his own practice and now works in all areas of the photo arena.  The one thing that stays consistent is his focus on all things California.
Images From California Dreamin’

 


Latin America Week: Adriana Zehbrauskas

This week, Argentinian photographer Eleonora Ronconi is taking over as guest curator, featuring work created by Latin American photographers…

Esta es la cuarta edición de la semana, y me da mucho placer presentarles a Adriana Zehbrauskas, fotógrafa brasileña que reside en el DF hace varios años.

Adriana is a photojournalist with an amazing eye. Her work caught my attention while I was looking for images on Faith, and these images had everything I had in mind: great compositions, grittiness and a lot of heart.  I am sharing her series Faith in Brazil and Mexico. 

Adriana was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil. She received a degree in Journalism and moved to Paris where she studied Linguistics and Phonetics at the Sorbonne Nouvelle. She worked as a staff photographer for  Folha de Sao Paulo for 11 years and is currently based in Mexico City, where she contributes regularly with the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Le Figaro and The Guardian, among others.

The series Faith in Brazil and Mexico was awarded an Art & Worship World Prize by the Niavaran Artistic Creation Foundation and a book is currently under production to be published by Bei Editores in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Image from Faith in Brazil and Mexico
What does your Latin heritage bring to your work?

I
think that in my specific case (not even sure if it is due to my
Latin heritage) it is an obsession with organizing the chaos in my
frame. I was born and raised in São Paulo and have lived the past
eight years in Mexico City, two huge metropolis where the visual
stimulation was always too much, there was always too much going on
at the same time ( São Paulo has now banned all outdoors including
even those hideous gigantic Mac Donald’s Ms). I felt this need to
clean my view, to calculate exactly what I wanted in my frame.

On
another level, Latin America is very religious and that permeates
every level of society in an everyday basis. The reference for the
sacred is constant and really difficult not to notice. I was always
very curious about this subject and I think I always find a way to
portray this angle into my stories.

Do you see a difference between work created in Latin America and
work created in the States?

It
is not a general rule, and I cannot speak for the whole Latin
America, but I see more long-term documentary projects coming out of
the US ( or US photographers) than out of Brazil, for instance.

What is the state of
photography in your country–is it well supported, are galleries
selling, do photographers have an outlet to show their work? 

I
don’t think it’s well supported, either in Brazil or Mexico.
It’s the effort of a handful of people who actually make it
happen. Outlets for showing work are dwindling by the day, newspapers
and magazines have less and less money /space so we have to get
creative now. The internet is a vast space, but we have to still
figure out the best way to use it. It’s just not a matter of
showing the work. Photographers are like any other people in the
world, we have to make money to survive!



Images from Faith in Brazil and Mexico 
 This
project was born from my inquisitiveness and deep curiosity about
religion. Living in Brazil, a country of immense cultural and
socioeconomic diversity and an extreme fertile ground for a plethora
of popular and religious manifestations, it was impossible to grow up
ignoring their intensity and strength.
Have
faith and you will go far”, “faith moves mountains”, and “one
must have faith” are expressions that permeate the day-to-day lives
of people from all social classes and religious beliefs.
With
their millenary experience, the major religions constitute powerful
intellectual structures capable of providing each individual with a
philosophy of life. They attend to the spiritual aspirations of the
human being and to the need to believe in noble values. They provide
answers to the individual’s anxieties when confronted with fear,
suffering and death. They assert that which is true, good and just,
helping each person interpret the world.
The
spiritual search is natural to every human being. It represents the
search for the meaning of life, humanity and coexistence. Religion is
unique to humankind. The cornerstone of any religion is faith. 
This
is a sample of a large photographic essay on  faith in Brazil
and Mexico, focusing on the similarities and differences of that
which is perhaps the only common denominator of all religion.

Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren

Running 004907,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

Articles | October 2012

We haven’t had an Articles post on the site for a long time, so some of the links are as old as from the past summer, but hopefully still relevant to those who haven’t yet read them… This first one’s recent though…interesting article in this week’s Newsweek by Sarah A. Topol on young rookie freelance journalists working in war zones….The main photo seen on the spread below is by Ben Lowy by the way (who is seen with Nicole Tung in the photo on the right), although he obviously isn’t one of the people discussed in the article…

Sarah A. Topol: Rookie Freelancers Risking Their Lives To Cover The Arab Spring (Newsweek)

Somewhat related perhaps… Action packed trailer to 4 part HBO documentary series on conflict photographers: Witness. Surprisingly, I could find very little info on the series online… It doesn’t even appear to have a website… I recognised three photographers in the trailer… Michael Christopher Brown, Eros Hoagland, and Veronique de Viguerie…There are four episodes though:  Libya, South Sudan, Juarez, and Rio… so perhaps there’s a fourth photographer featured, but I don’t know..

Witness : HBO documentary series on conflict photographers (YouTube)

New York Times correspondent Simon Romero on Tomas Munita in Lens blog…

Photo © Tomas Munita

Simon Romero: Losing Fear and Learning to See : on Tomas Munita (NYT Lens)

Magnum Photos CEO on the agency’s new strategy.

Magnum Photos’ new focus: online, online and online (BJP) ‘Magnum Photos’ activities used to be divided into two categories – new work and licensing – respectively dubbed M1 and M2. Now the agency’s CEO, Giorgio Psacharopulo, is pushing Magnum’s online activities as part of a new strategy.’

Photography writer Mary Panzer on the contemporary role of professional photojournalists using Magnum Photos as an example.

Mary Panzer: Magnum Irrelevant? (WSJ) ‘What does photojournalism mean now when everybody with a cellphone can upload pictures for the world to see, or when surveillance cameras provide the most reliable way to document a crime?’

Photo © William Klein

The month in photography (Observer) ‘The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Lise Sarfati, William Klein, Luc Delahaye and Lucas Foglia.’

Looking at the Land From the Comfort of Home (Lightbox)

Photo © Michael Nichols

Anatomy of an iPad App: A Photo Archive That’s Also an App (PDN) National Geographic photographer Michael Nichols launched an iPad app of his work that can be downloaded for $3.99.

6Mois: Biannual French magazine offers different approach to photography (BJP)

Hipstamatic angst, Instagram anxiety: time to move the conversation forward (David Campbell blog)

Laurence Butet-Roch: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: How photographers can benefit from social networks (BJP)

Introducing the six masters and 12 participants of the 2012 Joop Swart Masterclass (World Press Photo)

Couple of new photo blogs from the Middle East…

Photo blog by The National (Abu Dhabi)

Panorama by Egypt Independent newspaper

Al-Akhbar photo blog by Al-Akhbar newspaper in Lebanon

What sounds like an amazing exhibition on war photography coming up at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston…

Photo © Todd Heisler

Total War: A New Look at Conflict Photography (New Yorker) ‘In November, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, will unveil an exhibition on war photography unprecedented in scale and ambition. The origins of “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath” can be traced back to the museum’s acquisition—ten years ago—of the first known print of Joe Rosenthal’s famous photograph of the raising of the American flag at Iwo Jima.’

Amazing five-volume Gordon Parks collection from Steidl… which I’m sure I can’t afford… I’ve been a big Gordon Parks fan ever since I read his autobiography.

Photo © Gordon Parks

Five-Volume Collection of Gordon Parks’s Work by Steidl (NYT Lens)

James Estrin: In an Age of Likes, Commonplace Images Prevail (NYT Lens)

Are Photography Contests Worthwhile or Worthless? (PhotoShelter)

Photo © Maciej Dakowicz

Sean O’Hagan: Cardiff After Dark by Maciej Dakowicz (Guardian) ‘The Polish-born photographer’s epic study of Cardiff nightlife is a hymn to camaraderie and pleasure-seeking’

Reviewed: The Latin American Photobook (BJP)

Behind the Cover: Bill Clinton Photographed by Mark Seliger (Lightbox)

Dan Winters in a Thousand Words: An Ode to a Friend by Nick Offerman (Lightbox)

Photo © Robert Flora/Corbis

Malcolm X as Visual Strategist (NYT Lens)

Peter Dench: In Conversation With Homer Sykes (Photographer’s blog)

The New Economics of Photojournalism: Online Photography Workshops (BJP)

Colvin’s last passport was issued on December 20, 2005, four years after she lost her left eye to shrapnel in Sri Lanka. Here Colvin wears her signature eye patch.

The Passport to Prove It: A Stamped History of Marie Colvin’s Career (Vanity Fair) ‘Through the blurred ink of immigration stamps and festooned Middle Eastern visas, Marie Colvin’s passport reads like an illustrated time line for her coverage of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election, the rise of the Taliban, the Arab Spring, Muammar Qaddafi’s capture and death, and the conflict in Syria. After becoming a foreign-affairs correspondent for London’s Sunday Times in 1985, Colvin entered nearly every war zone on the planet right up to her death, in Homs, Syria, in February.’

Charlize Theron in talks to play war reporter Marie Colvin (Guardian) ‘Oscar-winning actor has signed on as co-producer for biopic of late Sunday Times war correspondent’

Photo © Henri Cartier-Bresson

Martine Franck obituary (Guardian) Martine Franck Legacy (Lightbox)  Martine Franck, Documentary Photographer, Dies at 74 (NYT)

Dan White ~ 1965-2012 (Panos)

Photographer holds festival of hope amid Aleppo fighting (CNN)

Swedes Schibbye and Persson ‘pardoned’ by Ethiopia (BBC)

Girl from Sebastião Salgado photograph found (DVA Foto)

Two-year probation for Shepard Fairey in image infringement case (BJP)

Kodak to sell off film division (BJP)

MediaStorm Spring 2013 Internship (MediaStorm)

The Guardian relaunches its Eyewitness photography app (BJP)

Carlyle Group to Buy Getty Images for $3.3 Billion (NYT)

Bad news for Reuters (The Independent)

Hollywood celebs and their Leicas…

Leica Cameras, Favored by Celebrities (NYT)

Who Can Improve on Nature? Magazine Editors and Photographers on Retouching Photos (NYT)

Hot off the press: The newsprint as a medium for photographers (BJP)

I AM The Boss, 1982 correspondence between Annie Leibovitz and Rolling Stone co-founder Jann Wenner (Letters of Note)

The most-viewed photo of all time?

Photo © Charles O’Rear

Is This the Most-Viewed Photo of All Time? (Mashable)

7 Lighting Tips for Shooting Video with Digital SLRs (PDN)

Advertising Standards Authority bans two Channel 4 ‘gypsy’ ads (BJP) ‘The ASA has banned two Channel 4 ads used to promote its hit show, My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding. BJP speaks to the author of the photographs featured in the ads’

Greg Funnell: Assignment: A look at the thought process behind a shoot (Photographer’s blog)

Dos and Don’ts: Writing a Photographer Bio (PetaPixel)

To finish off… 52 Worst Photoshop Mistakes In Magazines

Mike Sinclair, Bandstand

Mike Sinclair, Bandstand

Mike Sinclair

Bandstand,
Ames, Iowa, 2012
Website – MikeSinclair.com

Mike Sinclair is an architectural and fine art photographer living in Kansas City, Missouri. His photographs are frequently published in the Architectural Press and elsewhere, including the New York Times, Metropolis, Architectural Record and Interior Design. His work is in several public and private collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City; and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, also in Kansas City. He is represented by Jen Bekman Gallery.