Tag Archives: New York Times

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren

Running 005824,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

The Story Behind the Iconic Photograph from Sandy Hook

At 9:59 last Friday morning, Shannon Hicks pulled her 2006 Jeep Wrangler off the road just outside Sandy Hook Elementary school. As associate editor and photographer for Newtown, Connecticuts local paper, The Newtown Bee, she was responding to a radio dispatch heard over a local police scanner.

I thought it was going to be a false alarm, Hicks tells TIME, remembering the call last week. Gunshots fired inside an elementary school? No. seo marketing . Excellent SEO service . Not here, she thought.

But as she pulled up to the school, what she saw and heard removed all doubt.

The New York Times/Newseum

Parents just started yelling their childrens names, remembers Hicks, careful to grab her camera off the passenger seat as she climbed out of her vehicle and into the chaos of the scene.

The screams echoed loudly as Hicks tried to stay focused, composing each image though the eyepiece of her camera. She remembers watching a state trooper drive past her, get out of his vehicle, don his flak jacket, and announce to the panicked crowd that the scene was not secure.

She snapped frames of police and emergency personnel rushing to the school as well as of anxious parents already on scene pressed against police barriers, straining to see if their children had emerged from the building. Among armed police officers and weeping parents, she kept watch, diligently clicking the shutter.

At 10:09 am, 10 minutes after she climbed out of her vehicle, she snapped the shutter on an elementary school class being led out of the school by two Connecticut State Police officers.

I knew that, coming out of the building as terrified as they were those children were safe, Hicks said, of the photograph soon to grace the front pages of newspapers, magazines, and nearly every breaking news website around the world. I just felt that it was an important moment.

The picture wasnt sensational or disturbing, said Hicks, but it captured a feeling at least for the subjects and their families of relative safety amidst a maelstrom of fear and the harrowing unknown.

Los Angeles Times/Newseum

For the children freed from the school, parents rushed to their side, sweeping them up in firm embraces as they walked the 1100 feet to the nearby fire station. Hicks, camera in hand, followed them every step.

Ive heard from a few adults who anonymously called us [at The Newton Bee], and said it was very, very wrong to publish that one photograph. Hicks said, But Ive also had people come up to me mothers in particular whove said that the photograph was important because it showed that those children were safe.

By 11:30 that morning, Hicks, who is also a volunteer firefighter in Newtown, had passed the baton to another reporter from the paper, and had returned to the Bees office to coordinate the coverage.

There, for the next week, the small editorial staff would pull near-24 hour shifts, updating the website the paper is published weekly with news, community response and the obituaries of the 27 victims left in Fridays wake.

As a journalist, Hicks is proud to have documented the event, but issues caution to many media outlets now trolling the grounds in Newtown.

There are different levels of journalism out there, and ours [at The Bee] is not to follow people when they go to the funeral home, or the cemetery. We dont go knocking on the doors of victims of anything, said Hicks. Its very hard for us to watch other journalists do this to our neighbors.

Regarding her photographs popularity for lack of a better term Hicks said it came as a surprise and brings little personal relief. It is the cache of photographs buried on her cameras memory card, she said, that are hardest to look at and impossible to forget.

Im sure I will look through them someday, Hicks said, cognizant that the photographs she took that morning are now part of history.I just kind of wish that there were some that I could erase from my memory.”

Behind the Obama Cover: Person of the Year 2012

Last week, President Barack Obama, TIME’s Person of the Year for 2012, granted us a rare sitting with the legendary photographer Nadav Kander. We chose Kander because of his remarkable ability to capture the mood of a moment. He has photographed some of the most iconic people of our time — from Sir Paul McCartney and Brad Pitt to Mohamed Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically-elected president, who is also featured in this issue. The two Obama portraits appearing in the issue are the first formal portraits of the President since his re-election.

(See more: Barack Obama, 2012 Person of the Year )

As managing editor Rick Stengel writes in his editor’s letter, “We are in the midst of historic cultural and demographic changes, and Obama is both the symbol and in some ways the architect of this new America.” To capture that magnitude, TIME commissioned Kander, whose signature style is defined by his exquisite lighting and almost painterly touch, to make a historic cover. The last time he photographed the President was in 2009 for The New York Times Magazine.

Callie Shell for TIME

President Barack Obama with TIME’s Director of Photography, Kira Pollack, during the photo shoot in the Diplomatic Room of the White House on Dec. 12, 2012.

“When photographing such a high profile individual, it’s a huge challenge to not let their high profile take over the process,” Kander says. “I wanted to make a meaningful photograph that reflected pause in a person’s life and reflect his humanity.”

Kira Pollack, Director of Photography

(Related: 48 Hours with President Obama by Callie Shell )

TIME Picks the Top Photographic Magazine Covers of 2012

The best photographs don’t always make the best covers. It takes a smart concept, a meticulously executed image, smoothly integrated typography and the combination of all those factors to create an immediate and lasting impact. Our top ten photographic covers of 2012 show exquisite use of photography.

The most notable is New York Magazine’s magnificent cover by photographer Iwan Baan of a half blacked-out Manhattan during Hurricane Sandy. It’s instantly iconic and will become one of the greatest covers of all time. In the mix is also W‘s stunning fashion cover image of Marion Cotillard, ESPN‘s high-concept “Fantasy Football” cover, depicting an NFL player in a magical forest with a unicorn, and a photojournalistic cover, the Economist’s powerful image documenting the personal toll of the conflict in Gaza.

We also decided to include two covers in the mix that were striking photo-based illustrations. An aged Obama on the cover of Bloomberg Businessweek as well as a thoughtful commission by the New York Times Magazine for the visual artist Idris Kahn to reinterpret an iconic landmark on their London-themed cover.

A great cover is always a collaborative effort. To caption each of our selected covers, we spoke to a mix of editors, photo directors, art directors and photographers who took part during different stages of the creative process. In our selection, we refrained from choosing any TIME covers, though if we were to choose one, it would be Martin Schoeller’s arresting image of a mother breast-feeding her 4-year-old son, “Are You Mom Enough?”

Kira Pollack, Director of Photography

Frederic Weber, Ab Ovo

Frederic Weber, Ab Ovo

Frederic Weber

Ab Ovo,
, 2012
From the Gravitas series
Website – FredericWeber.net

Frederic Weber lives and works in Nyack, New York. His photographs have been reproduced in publications including Art + Auction, Aperture, Flash Art, The New Yorker, The New York Times and more recently, The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection (Aperture, 2011). Weber’s artworks are represented in several museum collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the George Eastman House, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, as well as many private collections such as Manfried Heiting, Bill Hunt and Fred Bidwell.

Features and Essays | November 2012

Photojournalism_Links

Second month in a row that Paolo Pellegrin has work in the National Geographic magazine…and what a timing for the subject, since the series was probably shot months and months ago and  based on an editor’s note the issue was just going to press when the most recent Gaza conflict escalated.

Amazing work. The below photo might not represent the story as well as some of the other photos in the NatGeo edit, it’s not directly related to the tunnels for one,  but I think it looks incredible and symbolises well Gaza as the world’s largest outdoor prison, which it in many ways is.

Photo © Paolo Pellegrin

Photo © Paolo Pellegrin

Paolo Pellegrin: The Tunnels of Gaza (NGM) ‘They are a lifeline of the underground economy but also a death trap. For many Palestinians, they have come to symbolize ingenuity and the dream of mobility.’

Frédéric Sautereau: Gaza (Paris Match)

David Degner: Scenes from Gaza’s Violence (Newsweek)

Terrific series in December’s NatGeo magazine by Carolyn Drake.

Photo © Carolyn Drake

Photo © Carolyn Drake

Carolyn Drake: Shamans: Masters of Ecstasy (NGM) ‘They are shamans—called by spirits to heal bodies, minds, and souls—and their numbers are growing.’

Great photos from Cuba on the New York Times website… Photographer’s name withheld… My guess is these might be Tomas Munita photos… but you are welcome to prove me wrong, if you have solid information.

Credit: The New York Times

Credit: The New York Times

[anonymous]: Changes in Cuba Create Support for Easing Embargo (NYT)

Julien Goldstein: Cuba (Photographer’s website)

Eros Hoagland: A Reckoning at the Frontier (NYT Lens) ‘Photographs of the Mexican Drug War Along the Border’

Michael Robinson Chavez: Rio de Favela (LA Times) [multimedia] | ‘Rio de Janeiro’s favelas border the city’s toniest areas and beaches. Rio is attempting to pacify the slums with a massive police presence. Still, drug gangs litter the city within sight of the stadium scheduled to host the Olympic Games in 2016.’

Two different edits of Robin Hammond’s Zimbabwe work which won the Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award…

Photo © Robin Hammond

Photo © Robin Hammond

Robin Hammond: Your Wounds Will Be Named Silence (Paris Match) Zimbabwe

Robin Hammond:  Zimbabwe (Lightbox)

“The challenge today is to make stories that transcend the millions of pictures that are shot but don’t actually say anything, to make sure that you’re giving a message through powerful photography and giving a voice to the people who are in your images.”  – Tom Stoddart

Audio slideshow of Tom Stoddart’s South Sudan work on the ICRC website, narrated by the photographer himself.

Photo © Tom Stoddart

Photo © Tom Stoddart

Tom Stoddart: Into The Earth (ICRC) South Sudan

John Stanmeyer: Battle-worn South Sudan copes with refugee health crisis (CNN Photos)

Congo crisis.

Well edited gallery on Time website with strong photos by Jerome Delay, Phil Moore, Tony Karumba et al.

Photo © Jerome Delay / AP

Photo © Jerome Delay / AP

(various photographers): Congo’s Crisis: Rebels Launch Offensive in Country’s East (TIME)

(various photographers): Rebel Attacks in Eastern Congo  (The Atlantic – In Focus)

Photo © Dominic Nahr

Photo © Dominic Nahr

Dominic Nahr: Rebels Gain Ground in the DRC (Magnum)

Jerome Delay: Battle in Eastern Congo (Washington Post)

Photo © Phil Moore / AFP

Photo © Phil Moore / AFP

Phil Moore: La Chite De Goma (Paris Match)

Phil Moore:  Congolese people flee town of Sake as fighting breaks out (Guardian) ‘As rebels and government-allied militia fight for the town of Sake, the Congolese inhabitants fled to the safety of the camps in the east’

Phil Moore: M23 fighters capture Goma in the DR Congo (Al Jazeera)

Jehad Nga: Deep Wounds of Past Produce New Violence in Congo (NYT)

Great portraits series on South Africa’s AIDS orphans by Jonathan Torgovnik

Photo © Jonathan Torgovnik

Photo © Jonathan Torgovnik

Jonathan Torgovnik: Generation of Orphans: South Africa’s Children of AIDS (Lightbox)

Greg Marinovich: South African Miners Strike at Fear (NYT Lens)

Per-Anders Pettersson: A Microcosm of the New South Africa (NYT Lens)

Pascal Maitre: An African Journey (NYT Lens)

Fernando Moleres: Sierra Leone Prisons (Lightbox)

Benedicte Kurzen: In Mozambique, a New Prosperity for Some (NYT)

Joe Penney: Guinea-Bissau (Guardian) ‘Reuters photographer Joe Penney depicts life in Guinea-Bissau and explores the legacy of years of conflict on this tiny West African country, from the fading symbols of its former Portuguese rulers, to the plight of those who fought for independence, and the impact that years of war have had on the current generation’

Moises Saman photographing the most recent turmoil in Cairo for TIME…brilliant photos..

Photo © Moises Saman

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman: Egypt: Thousands Protest President Morsy’s Decree (Time) NB last 6 photos in the slideshow by other photographers

Rena Effendi: Egypt Dispatch: Coptic Christians Grapple With Fear and Faith (Mother Jones)

Jerome Sessini: Battleground Aleppo (Magnum)

Matilde Gattoni: The Swallows of Syria (Lightbox)

Tom Pilston: The Battles for Syria (Panos)

(various photographers): Syria in Ruins (The Atlantic)

Niclas Hammarstrom: Syria’s Killing Fields (zReportage)

Adam Ferguson: Irak (Paris Match)

Andrew McConnell’s portrait series of urban refugees in different parts of the world…Fantastic..

Photo © Andrew McConnell

Photo © Andrew McConnell

Andrew McConnell: Hidden Lives (Panos) The untold story of urban refugees.

Stephanie Sinclair: The Secret World Of Child Brides (VII Magazine)

Sanjit Das: Amarnath Yatra (Panos) ‘Every year, hundreds of thousands of pilgrims make their way up to the Amarnath cave, 3,888 metres above sea level in the Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir, to visit one of the holiest sites in Hinduism.’

Sanjit Das: Burning Issue (FT Weekend) ‘India is suffering an unprecedented energy crisis. So why are fires being left to rage in Jharia, home to its richest coalfields?’

Sanjit Das: Malnutrition in an Indian Village (Businessweek)

Gaël Turine: The Fence of Shame (Agence Vu)

Raghu Rai: Desperate battle to save India’s children (BBC)

Brent Lewin: Sightseeing at India’s Camel Fair (WSJ)

Q. Sakamaki in the latest Newsweek Int’l…

Photo © Q. Sakamaki

Photo © Q. Sakamaki

Q. Sakamaki: China’s Outer Lands (Newsweek)

Bruno Barbey: Shanghai (Magnum)

Zhang Kechun: China’s Yellow River (Lightbox)

Sim Chi Yin: In China, a New Beginning (NYT)

Sim Chi Yin: Les révoltés de Wukan (Le Monde)

Sim Chi Yin: A Changsha, on n’arrête plus le progrès (Le Monde)

Joachim Ladefoged: +852 Hong Kong (VII)

Shiho Fukada’s series on young Japanese women working as hostesses.

Photo © Shiho Fukada

Photo © Shiho Fukada

Shiho Fukada: Cinderellas of the Night (Panos) ‘Job opportunities for women in Japan are scarce. A mere 65 % of women who graduate from university find permanent employment. Working as a hostess, or kyabajo, has become a viable, and well paid, alternative for many educated young women.~~In Japan, a hostess is a young woman who entertains men at bars or clubs. Customers pay considerable sums of money for the pleasure of their company – for flirting but no sex.’

Shiho Fukada: No Country for Old Men (Panos)

Shiho Fukada: Internet Cafe Refugees (Panos)

Michael Wolf: Tokyo’s Commuters (Slate)

Gary Knight: How China Wields ‘Soft Power’ in the Golden Triangle (Pulitzer Center) Burma |  ‘This place has always served as a watery junction where human and physical geographies collide. Burma, Laos and Thailand all meet here, as do the great Mekong and its smaller tributary, the Ruak, which tumbles down out of the Shan Hills.’

Gilles Sabrie: Towards a New Myanmar (Photographer’s website)

Ian The: Burma Spring (Agence Vu)

Kuni Takahashi: In Western Myanmar, a History of Hatred Emerges (NYT)

Alexander F. Yuan: The Waiting House: Caring for Burma’s HIV Patients (TIME)

Jes Aznar: A Baby Boom in the Philippines (IHT)

John Vink: Cambodia: The Off-ASEAN (Photographer’s website)

Taslima Akhter: Fighting Hopelessness Amid Ashes (NYT Lens) Aftermatch of garment factory fire on the outskirts of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul Movie Houses Take a Break From Insurgents and Chaos (Wired)

Bryan Denton: Herat, an Unusually Modern Afghan City (NYT)

Daniel Berehulak: Afghan War Amputees And Civilians Treated At ICRC Orthopedic Center (Getty Images archive)

Lorexon Tugnoli: Kabul’s Sex Workers Get Organized (WSJ) ‘Prostitutes Teach Colleagues About Condoms and Testing in Afghanistan’s Highly Conservative Society’

Robert Knoth and Antoinette de Jong: Poppy – Trails of Afghan Heroin (Foto8)

Brian Cassey: The Aak Puul Ngantam Stockman (Fotostrada)

Ulet Ifansasti: Death metal: tin mining in Indonesia (Guardian)

Hurricane Sandy.

Great to see Eugene Richards shoot  the Sandy aftermath for TIME…The edit could have been kept a little tighter, but there’s a sense of empathy in many of the photos and Richards’ captions, which really hit home and make you realise the huge magnitude of the devastation caused by Sandy not just on infrastructural, but on human level…

Photo © Eugene Richards

Photo © Eugene Richards

Eugene Richards: Devastation in Staten Island (Lightbox)

Stephen Wilkes: Aerial Photographs of Superstorm Sandy’s Aftermath (Lightbox)

Finlay Mackay: In Sandy’s Shadow: How the Redfern Houses’ True Ordeal Began After the Storm (Lightbox)

Susannah Ray: Recalling the ‘Right Coast,’ Before the Storm (NYT)

Plenty of empathy here too…

Photo © Todd Heisler

Photo © Todd Heisler

Todd Heisler: One Neighborhood, Unimaginable Loss (NYT)

NYT photographers: Glimmers of Light in a Darkened City (NYT Lens)

New Yorker photographers: After Sandy: Manhattan and the Rockaways (Photo Booth)

Massimo Berruti: Hurricane Sandy Aftermath in New York (Agence Vu)

Mario Tama: Superstorm Sandy, the aftermath (Guardian)

U.S. Politics.

Terrific portraits by Marco Grob…

Photo © Marco Grob

Photo © Marco Grob

Marco Grob: Class of 2016: The Political Leaders to Watch (Lighbox)

Grant Cornett: A History of the Campaign in 100 Objects (Lightbox)

TIME photographers: The 2012 Presidential Election Year in Pictures (Lightbox)

Christopher Morris: On the Road with Mitt Romney (Lightbox)

Christopher Morris: Romney Republicans (Photographer’s website)

Brooks Kraft: Last Days on the Road with Obama (Lightbox)

Michael Mergen: The Halls of Democracy: Places of Civic Responsibility (Lightbox)

Daniel Borris: Ohio’s Faith in Democracy (NYT)

Ashley Gilbertson and Ed Kashi: The Undecided (Photo Booth) video

Ashley Gilbertson: Ohio Voters: Before and After (Photo Booth)

New Yorker photographers: Election Morning: Florida and Virginia (Photo Booth

New Yorker photographers:  Election Day (Photo Booth)

New Yorker photographers: Scenes from Election Night (Photo Booth)

New Yorker photographers: Election Day: Swing States and Beyond (Photo Booth)

Jon Lowenstein: Election Night on Chicago’s South Side, in Polaroids (Photo Booth)

In awe of Hiroyuki Ito’s work in Lens…. (Last frame gave me a flashback of a Christopher Anderson’s Capitolio pic  #random)

Photo © Hiroyuki Ito

Photo © Hiroyuki Ito

Hiroyuki Ito: NYC (NYT Lens)

Pieter Hugo: Empire of the In-Between (NYT Magazine) video |  NB only the stills seen in the video by Hugo

Alec Soth: Foam Party (NYT Magazine)

Henry Leutwyler: Behind the Curtain at the New York City Ballet (New York Magazine)

Emine Ziyatdinova: In Brighton Beach, a Bittersweet Peace (NYT Lens)

Doug Ricard: Street View (Photo Booth)

Larry Racioppo: Hoops Spring Eternal (NYT Lens)

Brendan Hoffman: Gorgeous Photos From the Front Lines of Outsourcing (Wired)

Briony Campbell and Duncan Nicol Robertson: A New World – Hope and Fear on an American Roadtrip (Foto8)

Will Seberger: Homeland (zReportage)

Strong set on Portugal’s economic crisis by Mauricio Lima and equally so, one on Spain’s financial woes by Samuel Aranda… Both shot on assignment for The New York Times…

Photo © Mauricio Lima

Photo © Mauricio Lima

Mauricio Lima: Portugal Passes Another Austere Budget (NYT)

Samuel Aranda: Evictions on the Rise in Spain (NYT)

Samuel Aranda: Spanish Crisis (Photographer’s website)

Alvaro Deprit: Once Upon a Time in Tabernas (NYT Lens)

Guy Martin: Deadly Dust of Taranto (Panos) Italy

Murray Ballard: Cryonics (Wired)

Sophie Gerrard: The Dunes (Foto8)

Kayte Brimacombe: Homelessness: Mario’s story (Guardian)

Kenneth O’Halloran: Muddy Business (NYT Magazine) NB not the first photo in the slideshow | Irish jockeys

New Yorker Photo Booth showcased work from Magnum’s new book ‘Magnum: Revolution: 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom’

Magnum photographers: Revolutions (New Yorker Photo Booth) Related in Telegraph

Joop Swart Masterclass essays.

The future is bright for lot of these guys I’m sure…

Screen Shot 2012-11-30 at 15.57.52

Joop Swart Masterclass 2012 essays (World Press Photo)

Martin Parr: Life’s a Beach (Paris Match)

Ami Vitale: Bathtime (Panos) Hungary

Mugur Varzariu : Roma (NYT Lens)

Michal Solarski: Hungarian Sea (Burn)

Amanda Rivkin: Bachelor parties in Prague (CNN Photos)

Mathias Depardon: Tracing the past along the Black Sea’s coast (CNN Photos)

Andrew Testa: ‘He also collected books’ (Panos) Penis museum in Iceland

Thomas Peschak: The Shark Trade of the Arabian Sea (Lightbox)

Mary Beth Meehan, Suzanne & Eli

Mary Beth Meehan, Suzanne & Eli

Mary Beth Meehan

Suzanne & Eli,
Brockton, Massachusetts, 2010
From the City of Champions: A Portrait of Brockton, Massachusetts series
Website – MaryBethMeehan.com

Mary Beth Meehan is a Providence-based photographer whose work explores issues of identity, culture, and community. Her current series, City of Champions, looks at the changing post-industrial U.S. through the eyes of her hometown of Brockton, Massachusetts. The series is featured in the current issue of 6Mois Magazine and will be exhibited at the Griffin Museum of Photography in January, 2013. With support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, twelve photographs from the project were printed as 14-foot banners and mounted on buildings in Brockton’s distressed downtown core, sparking community-wide conversations about evolving urban identities, community dislocation, and the possibilities for social change. Her work has been published in 6Mois, LeMonde, DoubleTake, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Boston Sunday Globe. Meehan teaches at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

David Ellingsen

I have been a fan of David Ellingsen’s work since I picked up a postcard of his images at Photolucida some years back.  He has a new project, Obsolete Delete that  takes a look, in a very creative way, at technological obsolescence.  I am also featuring his project Skylife that follows the visual tread of his wider environmental work, “contributing to awareness and helping fuel the great call to action that, at this late hour, is imperative we clearly hear.” But he is also opening an exhibition, Sea/Life at the Djavid Mowafaghian Atrium, Beaty Biodiversity Museum in Vancouver that will run through February 3rd.

David was raised on Cortes Island, a remote community of 1000 residents in Canada’s Pacific Northwest, on a small family farm surrounded by forest and ocean. As an adult, David became a well-regarded commercial photographer gleaning advertising and editorial assignments from The New York Times Magazine, People, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, among many others. But David also has been able to create a parallel photo life, with a fine art resume reflecting dozens of exhibitions worldwide with numerous international awards and honors. It is his fine art work that brings him back to his childhood roots, to a focus that is steeped in the natural world.

Obsolete Delete 

This series looks at the ever increasing speed of technological obsolescence, the environment, and the collision of the two. When it comes to the state of the environment, our society’s cognitive dissonance, and more importantly the manifestations of this discomfort, has become a recurring motivator for my work and is certainly crucial to the meaning of this body of photographs. The distinct yet wildly divergent modern ideals that we are bombarded with – to consume and yet to conserve – provide a clear path to a source of our discomfort and again illuminate the seemingly willful ignorance of the urgency of the declining biosphere.

 SkyLife 
As the second part in a series, SkyLife continues the narrative from the SeaLife collection, investigating and documenting the organisms within the declining ecosystems of the planet. SkyLife focuses on creatures of the air – birds and winged insects – their beginnings, endings and the physical forms between the two. Like its predecessor, SkyLife is intended to be a part of the wider environmental discussion, contributing to awareness and helping fuel the great call to action that, at this late hour, is imperative we clearly hear.