Tag Archives: New York Art

Art for Sandy Relief: Iconic, Collectible Photographs to Benefit Hurricane Sandy Relief

20×200, in collaboration with TIME’s photography editors, has launched Art for Sandy Relief, a curated collection of Hurricane Sandy benefit editions. The photographs showcase both milestones and the mundane, characterizing the ever-changing and now ever-changed landscape of the authentic New York. Art for Sandy Relief comprises one of the largest art-fundraising efforts for Sandy to date. Twelve photographs in all, these museum-quality prints of New York and New Jersey are available until Dec. 16th.

“It’s an incredible honor to collaborate with TIME’s photography editors who have handled Sandy coverage with such grace and impact,” says Jen Bekman, 20×200’s founder and New York native. “We’re also thrilled to work with so many legendary photographers in service to a cause so close to us. This initiative is particularly significant to the 20×200 team since we are a New York City-based business and so eager to contribute to the rebuilding of the region. Partnering with artists to support institutions and causes that we believe in has been an important aspect of our program since its inception in 2007. This project is an extension of that practice, amplified considerably with the incredible resources and support from TIME.”

The images are works by notable artists; each reference the storms’ impact indirectly and are affecting works suitable for hanging in the home or as an addition to an existing collection. From a dramatic black-and-white ‘30s Manhattan cityscape by Alfred Eisenstaedt via the LIFE Picture Collection to a ‘70s Staten Island sunbather by Christine Osinski, these photographs are instantly iconic, reminders of all that seeks revitalization in the regions hit hardest by Hurricane Sandy.

These 12 archival prints are priced from $60 for an 11″x14″ print to $10,000 for a 60″x80″ print. To maximize the amount donated, all net proceeds from these special benefit editions will go to six local charities: Architecture for Humanity New York and New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund, Project Hospitality with the Staten Island Advance, Donors Choose Fund to Help Schools Impacted by Hurricane Sandy, Safe Space, and Red Hook Initiative Hurricane Relief Fund. These specialized organizations are dedicated to repairing infrastructure, helping schools and businesses get back up and running, and rebuilding family homes in the communities directly affected by the hurricane.

TIME has deployed reporters and photographers throughout the tri-state area since Sandy hit. Also, TIME’s parent company, Time Warner, has contributed $1 million to relief and recovery charities already. Richard Stengel, TIME’s managing editor, announced Art for Sandy Relief in his editor’s letter in the magazine that hits newsstands Monday, November 19th, saying, “In addition to documenting the devastation, we are determined to help those affected by it.”

Visit 20×200.com/time for more information on the photographs being offered. All images are available only until Dec. 16th.

Through the Glass Ceiling, Into the White Cube: 31 Women in Art Photography

Curators Natalia Sacasa and Jon Feinstein make no generalizations. Their show, “31 Women in Art Photography,” is a varied and diverse state-of-the-union of art photography encompassing all genres. The fact that each of the 31 photographs in the show was made by a female artist had no bearing on its curation. Feinstein first came up with the idea for the show as a response to increasing awareness of the male domination of the New York art world. He is quick to cite an article written in 2006 by Jerry Saltz of The Village Voice that begins, When it comes to being artists, women can be as bad as men, and goes on to scold every major gallery and museum in New York City for not allowing bad art by women to be shown at the same rate as men. A feminist collective called Brainstormers has presented research of the same ilk since 2005 detailing the grossly disproportionate representation of work by male over female artists in bluechip galleries and major institutions. Feinstein and the nonprofit arts organization he co-founded in 2005 called Humble Arts Foundation saw an opportunity. The show they made offers women artists real estate in gallery shows without bias. The whole reason we created Humble was to have it be a really democratic process and to find ways of showing really established photographers in the same context as recent graduates who we felt were making engaging or promising work, says Feinstein.

“31 Women in Art Photography” is now in its third incarnation. It has moved from its roots in a modest Brooklyn space where the first show was held in 2008 to a swanky white cube in Chelsea. Feinstein, who has curated the show each year with a different female co-curator, is this time working with Natalie Sacasa, senior director of another Chelsea gallery, Luhring Augustine. Despite Sacasa’s background in commercial galleries, she was able to be totally free in making her decisions for the show. I didnt take any commercial concerns into consideration when I was making selections,” she says. “For me it was definitely a taste perspective I wanted to present. Guillain-Barr syndrome . These are the people I think are the foremost practitioners in this medium.”

Amid the thousands of submissions received this year, a theme emerged: both men and women are making more pictures in studio, creating the object of their vision rather than going out in to the world to seek it. Theres a real consciousness of a non documentarian aesthetic,” says Sacasa. “People are not going out in the world so much to search out images that are meaningful to them, they are more creating them themselves. Whatever the difference between photographs made by men to those made by women, the array of pictures in this years show is stunning.

One photograph in particular, made by Lourdes Jeanette, stands out from the rest. Its an image of men acting very traditionally masculine, half naked and fighting. The exhibitions curators see this work as representative of a current trend. Sacasa proclaims exuberantly, The reason why I like it so much is because while its flash photography, documenting something thats going on, its almost as straight a photo as you can get, it has this incredible sculptural quality. The bodies at a certain point cease to be bodies and become volumes and forms. Its representative of a new direction.

This show is exciting because a platform has been created for the exclusive purpose of women having a voice in New York art institutions. From humble beginnings this show hangs in one of the most respectable galleries showing photography today, and that is a historical triumph for women and photography both.

“31 Women in Art Photography” will be on view at theHasted KraeutlerGallery in New York from July 26 to Aug. 17, 2012.

Sophie T. Lvoff, Carrollton Avenue

Sophie T. Lvoff, Carrollton Avenue

Sophie T. Lvoff

Carrollton Avenue ,
New Orleans, 2011
From the Hell’s Bells / Sulfur / Honey series
Website – SophieLvoff.com

Sophie T. Lvoff was born in 1986 in New York and received her BFA in photography and imaging, and philosophy from New York University. Exhibitions of her photographs have been shown in galleries and museums in the United States and Europe, including Institut d'Art Contemporain in Villeurbanne, France; Musée de l'Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland; The Contemporary Art Center in New Orleans; Grand Central Terminal in New York; the Aperture Foundation in New York; Art Miami; and Arthur Roger Gallery in New Orleans. Lvoff has also curated a number of group exhibitions in New York and New Orleans. She is a member of Good Children Gallery, a collective gallery in New Orleans that is currently participating in St. Claude Satellites, a satellite exhibition program during Prospect.2. She is an MFA candidate in Studio Arts at Tulane University.

Sophie T. Lvoff, Constance and Delachaise

Sophie T. Lvoff, Constance and Delachaise

Sophie T. Lvoff

Constance and Delachaise,
New Orleans, 2011
From the Hell’s Bells / Sulfur / Honey series
Website – SophieLvoff.com

Sophie T. Lvoff was born in 1986 in New York and received her BFA in photography and imaging, and philosophy from New York University. Exhibitions of her photographs have been shown in galleries and museums in the United States and Europe, including Institut d'Art Contemporain in Villeurbanne, France; Musée de l'Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland; The Contemporary Art Center in New Orleans; Grand Central Terminal in New York; the Aperture Foundation in New York; Art Miami; and Arthur Roger Gallery in New Orleans. Lvoff has also curated a number of group exhibitions in New York and New Orleans. She is a member of Good Children Gallery, a collective gallery in New Orleans that is currently participating in St. Claude Satellites, a satellite exhibition program during Prospect.2. She is an MFA candidate in Studio Arts at Tulane University.

Sophie T. Lvoff, Constance and Delachaise

Sophie T. Lvoff, Constance and Delachaise

Sophie T. Lvoff

Constance and Delachaise,
New Orleans, 2011
From the Hell’s Bells / Sulfur / Honey series
Website – SophieLvoff.com

Sophie T. Lvoff was born in 1986 in New York and received her BFA in photography and imaging, and philosophy from New York University. Exhibitions of her photographs have been shown in galleries and museums in the United States and Europe, including Institut d'Art Contemporain in Villeurbanne, France; Musée de l'Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland; The Contemporary Art Center in New Orleans; Grand Central Terminal in New York; the Aperture Foundation in New York; Art Miami; and Arthur Roger Gallery in New Orleans. Lvoff has also curated a number of group exhibitions in New York and New Orleans. She is a member of Good Children Gallery, a collective gallery in New Orleans that is currently participating in St. Claude Satellites, a satellite exhibition program during Prospect.2. She is an MFA candidate in Studio Arts at Tulane University.

Armory Arts Week New York

Clockwise from the top: Hank Willis Thomas’ “After Identity, What?, 2011,” Richard Mosse’s “Débris, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, 2011,” and Lars Tunbjork’s “42nd Street and Eighth Avenue, from the Times Square portfolio published May 18, 1997.”

Armory Week is almost here. Join us on Saturday, March 10 for our annual all-day Armory Collectors Brunch to mix and mingle with friends and colleagues in the heart of Chelsea’s art district. The event will include a special walk through of the current exhibition Shared Vision, with Marcelle Polednik, Director MOCA Jacksonville and collectors Sondra Gilman and Celso Gonzalez-Falla at 11:00 am, followed by book signings with Aperture artists including Bruce Davidson, Richard Mosse, Brian Ulrich, Penelope Umbrico, collector Bill Hunt.

Saturday, March 10, 10:00 am–1:00 pm
FREE

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor
New York, New York
(212) 505-5555

During Armory Arts Week, you can also visit Aperture at the eleventh annual SCOPE New York Art Fair. You can see some of our newest limited-edition prints from artists Hank Willis Thomas’ “After Identity, What?, 2011,” Lars Tunbjork’s “42nd Street and Eighth Avenue, from the Times Square portfolio published May 18, 1997” and Richard Mosse’s “Débris, North Kivu, Eastern Congo, 2011.”

This year, SCOPE’s VIP first view will take place on Wednesday, March 7 at an exciting, high profile location across from The Armory Show. The 35,000 square foot pavilion and its dramatic glass box entrance on 57th Street and 12th Ave will host 50 international galleries and museum-quality programming highlighting groundbreaking, emerging work in contemporary art and beyond.

First View:
Wednesday, March 7, 2012
3:00 pm–9:00 pm

Fair Continues:
Thursday, March 8, 2012-Sunday, March 11, 2012

Admission required.

SCOPE Pavilion
57th St & 12th Avenue
New York, NY 10019
212-268-1522

The New York Art Book Fair 2011

Join Aperture this weekend at the New York Art Book Fair, Printed Matter‘s annual fair of contemporary art books, catalogs, artists’ books, periodicals, and ‘zines offered for sale by over 200 international publishers, booksellers, antiquarian dealers, and independent artist/publishers representing the best in contemporary art publications. Philip Aarons, Chair of the Board for Printed Matter, Inc., says: “The NY Art Book Fair remains the premier venue to find what’s new in art publishing. This year’s focus on artists’ photography books, and the addition of more than 60 zinesters in an outdoor tent, will make this year’s edition of the Fair the best so far.”

Visit our booth featuring books such as Penelope Umbrico (photographs)Handbook by Gary Schneider, and The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois by Zoe Crosher and also now available is our new Aperture Tote!

Preview: Thursday, September 29, 2011
6:00 – 9:00 p.m.

Friday, September 30, 2011–Sunday, October 2, 2011
11:00 am–7:00 pm

This event is free and open to the public.

MoMA PS1
2225 Jackson Ave
Long Island City, New York

AO Onsite, New York – The Independent art fair Thursday March 3rd to Sunday, March 6th, 2011


Hotel Diaries 2001-2007, John Smith. Tanya Leighton Gallery. All photos courtesy of Art Observed, unless otherwise noted.

The second annual Independent art fair took place on Thursday March 3rd to Sunday 6th on 548 W 22nd street during New York Art Fair Week.  The award winning temporary exhibition forum was created last year as an alternative to the Armory Fair and featured forty five galleries from across the globe.  Participants included New York’s White Columns, Anton Kern, and Feature, INC., London’s Hotel Gallery and Studio Voltaire, as well as China Art Objects from Los Angeles and Rodeo, an Istanbul based gallery.


Installation view of work by Jon Pylypchuk, China Art Objects, Los Angeles.

More text and images after the jump…



Installation view of Feature, Inc.


Installation view of entrance, featuring Rob Pruitt’s 2010 Art Award “Trophy” for Best Alternative Project of 2010.

Independent was developed last year by Elizabeth Dee, founder of X Initiative, and Darren Flood of Hotel, London.  Matthew Higgs of White Columns, NYC was also involved as the creative advisor. However, what makes Independent unique is that the gallery-run art fair and functions more as a collaborative exhibition forum between galleries and curators, rather than a centrally organized event.

Elizabeth Dee, in an interview with The Observer in 2010, stated, “Independent is not supposed to be [an art fair.] Independent is really supposed to be a response to the discourse,” she said, “It’s really coming out of a response to the discourse and this new energy.”

Unlike the gridded off and very segmented method of presentation employed by the larger fairs, the galleries involved in Independent worked together to curate and organize the fair as if it were a collective exhibition. The viewer was able to explore the vast and diverse landscape of contemporary art and view work that would not normally be included in exhibitions dominated by commercial endeavors.


Matthew Monahan at Anton Kern booth, Independent 2011.

“We’re really excited to be here, ” Courtney Truet, a representative of Anton Kern told AO. “It’s a great opportunity to show pieces that are more difficult or more aggressive. We enjoyed being able to focus more on the curatorial aspect of designing the booth as opposed to just on the commercial aspects.”

“Some pieces are new. For example, Anne Collier wanted to show a brand new series that she had completed just before the fair. But the Matthew Monahan is an earlier work from 2007. We had a recent show of his work at the gallery and that did extremely well, but this work is to show where the artist came from. The materiality of his work has changed very drastically and his works have a very different feeling to them.  But this fair is a good opportunity to bring out a work that needs some room to breath.”

“It’s a great group of galleries,” She continued, “The program was handled really beautifully. We really responded to the openness of the space and the layout of the building.”

Other prominent works in the show included a room-size cube that, reminiscent of a drawing or diagram, consisted of a network of attached metal segments and was exhibited by Bortolami Gallery.


Pièce Détachée,
Michel François. 2010. Bortolami Gallery.


Installation view of Andrew Kreps Gallery, featuring Large Dark Windchime, Klaus Weber. 2008.

On the third floor, a massive and ominous looking black windchime hung from the ceiling at Anton Kern, while a pair of opposing red and green felt letters took on architectural, or even figurative qualities at Sutton Lane Gallery.


Blake Rayne, Sutton Lane Gallery.

Also quite striking were a set of eight drawings by emerging Swiss artist Marta Rinker-Radich at Wilfred Lentz Gallerie, Rotterdam.


Marta Riniker-Radich, 2010. Wilfred Lentz, Rotterdam.

It’s no surprise Independent took Rob Pruitt’s Art Award for Best Alternative Project 2010 in its maiden year. The fair consisted of collaboration, collective, and curatorial edge, and, as each exhibition flowed seamlessly into the next, one had the sense of differentiation existing without boundaries.

Related Links:

Independent [Website for Independent]
The Observer
[2010 Interview with Elizabeth Dee]