Tag Archives: New Photography

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber

Record Player,
Boston, 2003
From the Countrypolitan series
Website – MatthewGamber.com

Matthew Gamber (b. 1977) holds a BFA from Bowling Green State University, and an MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts / Tufts University. Recent exhibitions include: Second Nature: Abstract Photography Then and Now, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012 The 2012 deCordova Biennial, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012; Flash Forward 2011 Exhibition, Magenta Foundation, Toronto, CA, 2011; The Sum of All Colors, Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York, 2011. Awards include: Traveling Fellowship, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2011; Humble Art Foundation, New Photography Grant, 2011; Grant Recipient, LEF Foundation, New England (awarded for Big RED & Shiny), 2007 & 2005.

Mónika Sziládi, Untitled (Blonde)

Mónika Sziládi, Untitled (Blonde)

Mónika Sziládi

Untitled (Blonde),
, 2011
From the WIDE RECEIVERS series
Website – Msziladi.com

Mónika Sziládi was born and raised in Budapest, Hungary and lives in New York. She holds an MFA in Photography from Yale (2010) and a Maitrise in Art History and Archaeology from Sorbonne, Paris (1997). In 2008 she received the Gesso Foundation Fellowship to attend Skowhegan and she is a 2012 resident at Smack Mellon. She is a winner of The Philadelphia Museum of Art Photography Competition (2010), a recipient of the Alice Kimball English Traveling Fellowship (2010), a Juror’s Pick by Julie Saul and Alec Soth, Work-in-Progress Prize, Daylight/CDS Photo Awards (2010) and the recipient of Humble Arts' Fall 2012 New Photography Grant. Selected exhibitions include Point of Purchase, DUMBO Arts Center, NYC (2006); Lost and Found, Staatliche Kunsthalle, Baden-Baden, Germany (2007); Designations, NT Gallery, Bologna, Italy (2008); Market Forces, Carriage Trade Gallery, NYC and Galerie Erna Hecey, Brussels (2009); US Featured Exhibition, Flash Forward Festival, Toronto (2010); 31 Women in Art Photography, Hasted Kraeutler, NYC. (2012).
 

MoMA’s New Photography 2012

Since it was established in 1985, the annual New Photography exhibition at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art has sought to showcase emerging photographers who are experimenting with techniques, subject matter and presentation that challenge the very definition of the medium itself. That goal has only gotten more difficult each year, as advances in technology and social media sites such as Facebook and Instagram have bombarded viewers with a proliferation of images; the New York Times predicts that more than 380 billion photographs were taken in 2011 alone. That saturated environment serves as the backdrop of this year’s show, which opens Oct. 3 and runs through Feb. 4. And while it’s a reoccurring theme among this year’s five featured photographers (Michele Abeles, Shirana Shahbazi, Zoe Crosher, Anne Collier and the collective Birdhead, composed of Shanghai natives Ji Weiyu and Song Tao), the artists’ different approach to image saturation nods to the wide breath of work that New Photography hopes to survey each year.

“We often think about variety and diversity, so that each artistwhatever ideas they’re exploringwill stand apart from one another,” says associate curator Eva Respini. “It’s in the mix of the artists that you can get a sense of the diversity of what’s happening in contemporary photography today.” Among this year’s mix: Abeles (American, b. 1977), whose collage-like work juxtaposes male nudes against common objects like wine bottles; Shahbazi (German, b. Iran 1974), who disseminates her images in various creative ways, such as a photo rug with help from weavers in her native Tehran; Crosher (American, b. 1975), who re-purposes and re-photographs Michelle Dubois’s existing archive of self portraits; Collier (American, b. 1970), who combines found objects in her reflection of mass media and pop culture; and Birdhead, (Ji Weiyu, Chinese, b. 1980, and Song Tao, Chinese, b. directory submission . 1979), whose black-and-white snapshots of daily Shanghai life are installed in grid format, without ever identifying the author of an individual image. “The fact that they don’t really distinguish who takes what pictures speaks to what their work is about,” says Respini. “It’s a reflection of a Facebook generationa generation that’s used to thinking about multiple images and an accumulation of images instead of discrete images that are elevated to a fine art status.” Four of the five artists are women, a trend Respini says would be “great to continue.”

Even the installation of the show itself reflects photography’s changing nature. Visitors will see traditional modes of presentationsuch as framed photographs on a wallbut also more sculptural elements, such as lithographic wallpaper fromShahbazi and a site-specific configuration from Birdhead. This, combined with the diverse output from the photographers themselves, willas MoMa surely hopes, anywayelevate New Photography 2012 from the mass of photography exhibitions.

New Photography opens October 3, and runs through February 4, 2013. Learn more about the show here.

In Amsterdam, a Photo Festival ‘Unseen’

This fall, Amsterdam—known for its innovative photo community— will welcome a new photography festival to its Dutch district. Called Unseen, the festival hopes to be a festival that, well, viewers have never seen before, with a focus on new and emerging talent as well as an aim to showcase never-before-seen work from established favorites including Richard Avedon, Steven Klein, Helmut Newton and Edward Steichen, among others.

Taking place from Sept. 19-23 at Amsterdam’s Westergasfabriek, the fair comprises more than 50 galleries hailing from around the world. With photography from places as diverse as Japan and New York, Dubai and Finland, the scope of the work will range from documentary to conceptual to experimental. Highlights include Miles Aldridge’s Immaculee #3 (Red Madonna), 2012, which reaffirms the long standing relationship between photography and iconographic painting, but pushes the boundary of what we expect as a viewer by asking the virgin figure to maintain eye contact and acknowledge the image maker. Also of interest is Zanzibar, 2010, by Chloe Sells. The American photographer explores the idea of land and nostalgia through her experimental darkroom C-prints. Colorful and graphic with bold colors and strong shapes, yet abstract and ambiguous, her images inspire thoughts of place and placelessness.

While there are many photography fairs around the world, Unseen works to offer a few additions to the typical fair. There will be a collection of affordable photographs, all priced under 1,000 euro (approximately $1280), to both help young photographers reach a new audience, as well as allow the young collector, or photography appreciator to invest in affordable work. And for the book connoisseur, Offprint Amsterdam will be at the fair, curating a new collection of self published and limited edition books.

You can learn more about the galleries featured and the day-to-day events here. Unseen is a project initiated by Foam, Platform A and Vandejong.

Christopher Colville, Impact

Christopher Colville, Impact

Christopher Colville

Impact,
Yuma County Arizona, 2010
From the Instar series
Website – ChristopherColville.com

Christopher Colville was born in 1974 in Tucson Arizona. After receiving his BFA in Anthropology and Photography from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and MFA in Photography from the University of New Mexico, he returned home to the Sonoran Desert and is currently living in Phoenix, where he is a visiting Assistant Professor at Arizona State University. Christopher’s work has been included in both national and international publications as well as recent solo and group exhibitions at the Griffin Museum of Photography, Rayko Photo Center, The center for Photography at Woodstock and the 2012 Noorderlicht Photo festival. Recent awards include the Humble Art Foundations 2009 New Photography Grant, an Arizona Commission on the Arts Artist Project Grant, a Public Art Commission from the Phoenix Commission on the Arts as well as an artist fellowship through the American Scandinavian Foundation.

Christopher Colville, Impact

Christopher Colville, Impact

Christopher Colville

Impact,
Yuma County Arizona, 2010
From the Instar series
Website – ChristopherColville.com

Christopher Colville was born in 1974 in Tucson Arizona. After receiving his BFA in Anthropology and Photography from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and MFA in Photography from the University of New Mexico, he returned home to the Sonoran Desert and is currently living in Phoenix, where he is a visiting Assistant Professor at Arizona State University. Christopher’s work has been included in both national and international publications as well as recent solo and group exhibitions at the Griffin Museum of Photography, Rayko Photo Center, The center for Photography at Woodstock and the 2012 Noorderlicht Photo festival. Recent awards include the Humble Art Foundations 2009 New Photography Grant, an Arizona Commission on the Arts Artist Project Grant, a Public Art Commission from the Phoenix Commission on the Arts as well as an artist fellowship through the American Scandinavian Foundation.

Scott B. Davis: Success Stories and the Medium Festival of Photography

When you think about busy people, Scott B. Davis is surely at the top of that list.  Scott recently opened an exhibition, Black Sun, at Hous Projects in New York (running through September 1st), works full time at the Museum of Photographic Arts in San Diego as the Director of Exhibitions and Design, has created a brand spanking new photography festival, the Medium Festival of Photography that launches September 6-8th, and just closed on a new home.  And those are just the big things.

Born in Maryland, Scott received his BFA in Photography from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.  The son of a private pilot, Scott developed ideas about landscape at an early age.  He began using a view camera in 1994 and photographing the desert at night in 1997.  These aesthetic approaches to making work allow him to define space in a contemplative way where he is diminishing the traditional landscape in favor of highlighting human presence within the landscape. He believes that no single truth exists about landscape, and the most honest photographs equally consider light, dark, human and natural elements.

In 2002, Scott built a 16×20″ view camera, used it exclusively for 5 years and created large platinum prints. He recently has returned to an 8×10 view camera and continues to work in platinum.  Scott has exhibited internationally, is widely published, and his work is held in many significant collections.

An interview with Scott follows…

Balboa Park, San Diego
2011 Platinum/Palladium Print

INTERVIEW
Congratulations on the exhibition at Hous Projects in New York City.  I love the idea of making imagery that you almost have to squint to understand completely.  What compels you to shoot in the dark?

making photographs
at night came out of a desire to discover new landscapes and engage
fully in the act of looking. i frequently travel in remote parts of the
desert, and revel in the simply joy of seeing new spaces. but like most
of us, i spend the majority of my hours at home. it’s in this realm that
i keep my eyes engaged by shooting what i know, and what we all live
with day in and day out. shooting in the dark is a kind of compulsion…
something that boils down to a simple desire to discover new
landscapes.
Intersection, San Diego
2010 Platinum/Palladium Print
I understand that you built a 16×20 view camera in 2002–is that what you use exclusively to make work?
i
used the 16×20 camera exclusively from 2002 until about 2007. as film
prices started to climb and i wanted to keep exploring new visual
territory it made sense to retire the beast and move back to smaller
film. beginning in 2007 i’ve used my 8×10 for everything i shoot. i’ve
enjoyed the liberty of exposing more film, and now scanning those
negatives to make large platinum prints.
Canyon, Los Angeles
2009 Platinum/Palladium Print
Talk about the slowed down nature of making work through this process and, in particular, at night.
making
work at night is a meditation, as is platinum printing. in terms of
making night photographs, it is an act of paying attention to spaces we
pass every day, and looking for beauty where others see nothing. i begin
to see more as i look for those magic spaces ‘in between’, and in
return the landscape beings to teach me. i discover places i would have
never thought important, compelling, or beautiful, and i learn more
about the neighborhoods and places that are equally a part of the urban
spaces we call home. our eyes are subjective consumers, and in the daily
ritual of looking we tend to see everything as a photograph. or a
potential photograph. but as photographers we know most of these don’t
work out. it’s our intentions and “vision” that makes an image worth
printing, or even shooting in the first place. when i’m actively
photographing at night i do everything from consider the exposure to
thinking about how i want to show detail in the final print, or how i
might need to compensate for detail in development and printing. it’s
all very ansel adams! [laughs] from there i’ll set up the camera and
tripod, then begin the nuts and bolts of picture making. exposures are
the quickest part, ranging from a minute to maybe an hour depending on
where i am and what i’m trying to achieve. printing is an entirely
separate process, but an equally important one, best left to itself.
VW Bus, San Diego
2010 Platinum/Palladium Print
You are well ensconced in the San Diego photographic community, and your day job is at the Museum of Photographic Arts as the Director of Exhibitions and Design.  What is a typical day at the museum, and how does being surrounded by so much great photography influence your own work?
my typical day at mopa
is a diverse range of management, design, and long range planning. that
can take the form of anything from meeting project deliverables to
branding and laying out individual exhibitions. i spend a lot of time on
the minutia of exhibition planning, which is to say the administrative
tasks nobody (viewers) should be thinking about when looking at a
finished exhibition. i believe that if my work appears invisible then
i’ve done my job well. it’s a nice metaphor for my own work outside the
museum too. but one of the great rewards at mopa is working with a team
of talented people and being exposed to art on a daily basis, be it
historic work by known photographers, unknown photographs that are
simply wonderful, or contemporary artists who are pushing new
boundaries. it is enriching, and i’m certainly very lucky.
Palm Tree, near Washington and Venice, Los Angeles
2012 Platinum/Palladium Print
I am so excited about the new Medium Festival of Photography that is coming up in San Diego in September.  How did it come about and can you share a little about the festival?
medium
came about as a way to engage with photographers on a deeper level.
being a working artist myself i meet more talented photographers than
anyone has wall space to exhibit. wanting to give a platform to this
abundant creativity was where it began, and finding a way to share that
with a larger audience is where it started to gel. the festival is a
celebration of creative photography spread over three days. it kicks off
with a keynote lecture by alec soth and is followed by a diverse range
of speakers covering topics from wet plate to a live sunburn
demonstration by chris mccaw, and much more! we have a portfolio review
event on saturday that offers photographers the chance to engage with
curators, editors, and gallery owners. it’s going to be a fantastic
addition to the photo community in southern california!
Covered Sedan, San Diego
2011 Platinum/Palladium Print
You wear so many hats in the photo world — successful photographer, Museum Director, Festival Director, friend and supporter of all things photography — how do you balance it all?
managing
a busy schedule is a lot of work, though i find the act of it both
encourages and defines each new step. i believe we should all live our
purpose—what the hindu religion calls dharma—but this is
something we’re largely disenfranchised from in the west. inspiring
others through photography is my life path, and from the outside it
appears to be a lot of work. and it is. but loving what you do and
“working” are two separate ideas to me. i strive to insure my actions
provide an enriching return, not just to me, but to others.  this is the
secret to maintaining a balance. work and give back to others. it comes
full cycle.
Silver Lake, Los Angeles
2010 Platinum/Palladium Print
When you were emerging as a photographer, what took your work to the next level, and what suggestions do you have for photographers trying to establish themselves?
my work evolved
through the passionate study of good photographs, which meant reading a
lot of books and attending as many lectures as i could. the greatest
influences on me were workshops offered by master photographers. these
short, 3 to 5 day experiences taught me more than anything i learned in
formal study at a prestigious university. they helped define my dharma.
Ben’s Auto, Los Angeles
2009 Platinum/Palladium Print
An finally, what would be your perfect day?

my perfect day would involve opening someone’s eyes to photography. this
could mean sharing the magic of a camera with someone or teaching them
something new about the medium. it could also mean my learning something
new, which is a borderline addiction. i recently discovered a book of
desert writings that i hadn’t picked up in several years. the process of
sitting down with this book and re-reading it page by page has turned
into a series of perfect days, one after the other. the writing has
little to do with photography but has given me a half dozen new ideas to
think about… a half dozen new reasons to follow my camera into new
territory. the perfect day is about eye opening experiences, plain and
simple. who’s eyes those are is less important than the act of
inspiration itself.
Tract Home, La Jolla
2011 Platinum/Palladium Print

Sedan, Rice California
2009 Platinum/Palladium Print


Photo News – Art Fund supports a major collection of Middle Eastern photography and show for V&A and British Museum

“In the past few years contemporary photographic practice from and about the Middle East has been some of the most exciting, innovative and varied art anywhere in the world…” Marta Weiss, curator

From the series Upekkha, 2011, Nermine Hammam, 2011. Archival inkjet print, 60 x 90 cm, Copyright V&A. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum, Light from the Middle East: New Photograph

A major collection of contemporary photography, focusing on the Middle East, has been set up for the public by the British Museum and the V&A with funds from the Art Fund. The collection has been in development since 2009 and is funded by over £150,000 of support from the Art Fund.

Most of the collection will be showcased at the V&A (Porter Gallery) in an exhibition Light from the Middle East: New Photography opening on 13 November 2012 and running until 7 April 2013. The show will be the first major museum exhibition of contemporary photography from and about the Middle East and will tour nationally in 2013.

The show is divided into three sections around key themes: Recording, Reframing and Resisting. Expect works that “respond to the social challenges and political upheavals of the Middle East over the last 30 years” or “the last 20 years”, depending on which of the two press releases one reads.

Included are internationally established practitioners such as Abbas (Iran), Youssef Nabil (Egypt) and Walid Raad (Lebanon) as well as emerging photographers including Taysir Batniji (Palestine), Atiq Rahimi (Afghanistan), Shadi Ghadirian (Iran), Mehraneh Atashi (Iran), Nermine Hammam (Egypt), Manal al-Dowayan (Saudi Arabia) and Abdulnasser Gharem (Saudi Arabia), who also happens to be a lieutenant colonel in the Saudi army.

‘Bodiless I’ from the series ‘Zourkhaneh Project (House of Strength)’, Mehraneh Atashi, 2004. Digital c-print, 76.5 x 112.5 cm. Copyright British Museum. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum. Light from the Middle East: New Photography

There are over 80 works (90 in one press release) in the collection produced by 22 (28 in one press release) emerging and established artists “living in the region or in diaspora”. The works are diverse in terms of technique and subject matter and straddle genres including photojournalism, staged and manipulated imagery.

The collection of Middle Eastern photography has been “built in response to a surge of interest in the visual arts in the region, beginning to remedy the under-representation of Middle Eastern photography in the UK”.

From the series ‘Mothers of Martyrs’, Newsha Tavakolian, 2006. Digital c-print, 50 x 76 cm, Copyright V&A. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum

To see the collection go to Art Fund Middle Eastern.

From the series ‘Qajar’, Shadi Ghadirian, 1998. Gelatin silver bromide print, 30 x 24 cm. Copyright V&A. Art Fund Collection of Middle Eastern Photography at the V&A and the British Museum. Special terms: Light from the Middle East: New Photography

Filed under: Photographers, Photography News, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Art Fund, Atiq Rahimi, British Museum, contemporary photography, Light from the Middle East: New Photography, Marta Weiss, Mehraneh Atashi, Shadi Ghadirian, V&A