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Ewa Zebrowski: Finding Wyeth

Ewa Zebrowski‘s new book project takes a look at the quiet world of a master painter, revealing a sense of place, light, and New England sensibilities. Ewa’s wonderful limited edition artist’s book titled, Finding Wyeth, captures images of the Olson House located on the Cushing Peninsula in Maine, where for 30 years Andrew Wyeth created over 300 paintings, including his famous painting, Christina’s World.  The book comes in an edition of 20 and is available through Ewa: [email protected]


 I walked in, went upstairs, and suddenly I was startled.
There was another figure standing there.
It was me in a dusty mirror…
The reason I did it was that I wanted a portrait
of the dryness of the place,
that special sort of dryness of dead flies
that are left in a room that’s been closed for years.
                                                      Andrew Wyeth
                                           on painting The Revenant, 1949
The Olson House
 Andrew Wyeth spent a lot of
time 
some three  decades (1939-1968), at the Olson House (which belongs to the Farnsworth Art Museum)on the Cushing Peninsula in Maine, talking, sketching, painting, finding inspiration.


Alvaro and Christina Olson, the bother and sister who lived there, became his friends.  He used an upstairs room as his studio, where he painted over 300 paintings.  It was the view from a third story window that inspired his well known/iconic painting, Christina’s World.


I visited the empty house during the summer of 2010, a house filled with tangible emotion and light.  A house pregnant with stories and secrets.

       A bouquet of tangled wildflowers,
       tiny seashells in a bird’s
nest,
       empty glass canning jars,
peeling wallpaper
and silence,
the residue of so much emotion
in this old weathered wooden house
on a hill,
filled with light
and vanished dreams,
the black horse wandering lost,
the apples ripe on the ground.
                                                        
EMZ

Part 3 of Hometown Exhibition



Amy FichterRoller Skating, Shenandoah, IA





Trisha BarryEarly Morning Light, Nichols and Stone, Gardner, MA





                Mary Anne MitchellPiedmont Park Festival, Atlanta, GA


Hans BrooymansNever a dull moment on the way to the dentists’ office, Almere (The Netherlands)


John LawrenceGuam Cir., Cypress, CA


Stan Banos, Battery Park, NYC


Garry LoughlinColumb’s Barracks, Mullingar, Ireland










Keith DannemillerSan Judas Rides the Metro, México, DF, México 

April Rocha, Station 26, Santa Monica, CA
Sarah BilottaErin’s Cornfield, Hollis, NH

Diane CockerillWindshield Tourist. Los Angeles, CA 


Kimberly EdwardsSecond Line Season, New Orleans, LA


Darrell LecorreMy Neighbors, Mission, British Columbia, Canada






Harvey HanigFree TV 107 Dee  Road, North Aurora, IL




Andi SchreiberSummer’s Idyll, Scarsdale, NY 
Mitchell HartmanOn the Platform, Queens, NY
Jim Marz, My New Home Town, Crestline, CA
Gary HaighParked Car,  Adelaide, South Australia    
Bill WardGlasgow Rain, Glasgow, Scotland 
Michael BarathArt Walk, Canton, OH
Sarah PollmanGardening from the series Instagram Poetry, Boston, MA 


Joel Butler, City Center, Las Vegas, NV
Emma PowellMy First House, Middlebury, VT


Frauke Langguth,  Berlin Reichstag playground, Berlin, Germany
This is well known spot in Berlin, the Reichstag building, now the seat of the German parliament Bundestag. I like the atmosphere in the picture and in reality – although the building is the centre of German politics, you can still  play soccer on the grass in front of it.  In the background you can spot two building cranes, which is also very typical for Berlin for the last two decades.



Karen Bakerhometown1, hometown2, Venice, CA

Bea FresnoRTM, Rotterdam, The Netherlands


Bruce MortonMy Home Town, Bowen, IL


Jason NeelyMiddletown, Middletown, CT 

Kathy LeistnerBanks of the Abash, Lafayette, IN
I took this photograph when I came back to my hometown to help my Mom after she had heart surgery.  I grew up a few blocks from the Wabash River and in college I rowed on it with crew team at Purdue.  Flooding from the river every spring is part of life in West Lafayette/Lafayette.  Every day the river is different and always worth the time to look at it. The Battle of Tippecanoe took place about 7 miles outside of West Lafayette and it was an important waterway for the Native Americans in this area.
Shawna Gibbs, Laurel St., Claremont, NH 
Eric BreitenbachThe Family Of Trayvon Martin, Sanford, FL    
Jane GottliebSanta Barbara Mission Fire (2010), Santa Barbara, CA

Bill ChapmanDream, Cambridge, MA  


Marco BucchieriFog # 9, Pieve di Cento (Bologna, Italy)

Christa Blackwood, Austin, TX

Karen CarsonBob’s Drive-In, Toluca Lake (Burbank) CA  


Panos Lambrou, Samos Town, Samos, Greece
Here is a photo of my home town Samos Town, Samos, Greece. The house I lived in as a child is the two story house at the bottom left by the sea. I took my very first photograph on the second floor balcony of that house when I was 10 years old with a Agfa box camera.
Kevin McCollister, March 22, 2012, Los Angeles, CA
Barrry Steven GreffLone Tree at Sunset, Weston, FL 
Robert SchlaugSpalt, Germany
Alicia Goodwin, Cinema Five, Portsmouth, New Hampshire
I kissed my first boy in that theater!
Marisa SciabarrasiEntrance, Portsmouth, NH 
Ryan SegediThe world in your mailbox, Savannah, GA
Tom PaivaSewer to the Sea, Los Angeles, CA (Playa del Rey) 
Lauren Grabelle, Gunther in the Grass, Bigfork, MT
Russ Rowland, Brooklyn Blue, New York City
Adam NeeseMap of Memories, Grapevine, TX


Laura Glabman, Untitled, Far Rockaway, NY

CONTINUE TO PART 4 by clicking “Older Post” below





2012 LENSCRATCH Hometown Exhibition

The 2012 LENSCRATCH HOMETOWN EXHIBITION

  
My Home is in my Head by Susan Barnett

Thank you for your wonderful submissions that show us where you came from or where you live now…these insights and interpretations connect us in a meaningful way and truly reflect our international community.  Enjoy the last days of summer and thank you so much for reading LENSCRATCH.

Hollis Call, Foggy Morning, Santa Barbara, CA
Kristy CarpenterMeth Watch, Bronson, MI 

Loretta AyeroffFairfax Ave and Third Street, Dedicated to Raymond Chandler, Los Angeles, CA

Bootsy Holler, Tumbleweeds, Richland, WA 

Renate Aller, Elbe, Hamburg / Germany

Nancy BaronHollywood, #1, Los Angeles, CA

Laura Valenti Jelen, Jonathan, near Crater Lake, OR
I’ve moved around a lot in my life and have never felt that I’ve
had a home town. But, this image was taken near my current home in
Oregon. The wild spaces in this beautiful state are some of the places I
feel most at home.
Garin Horner, 2012.2, Oakwood Cemetary, Adrian, MI



Lori Bell, Fall Vineyard, Santa Maria, CA
Patricia Bender, The House, Somerset, NJ
Robert WelshJimmie and Robbie
Fanuel Public Housing Projects, Boston MA

Julia Dean, Diner, Broken Bow, NE

Sally DeFordGrand Junction Steel, Grand Junction, CO
Jamie House, Stranger, Plymouth, UK




Mariana Bartolomeo, Mam Ethel Tysky, Mission, KS










Kristina Smith, Mt. Carmel Babydoll Dance, Youngstown, OH 






Rusty J. Joerin, Ready to Start, Qualicum Beach, British Columb






Stan RaucherSevenscore Years Later, Pioneer Square, Seattle, WA











                     Laidric StevensonBANG! – Grassy Knoll, Dallas, Tx










Daniel Rozmiarek, Medic, Bel Air, MD









Bruce Martin, Rip Van Winkle watches over Catskill, Catskill, New York







Mark Peterman, Intersections, Lansing, MI  










Diana Zlatanovski, Wicker Park at Night, Chicago, IL 

Mary Economidy, Lonesome Whistle, Wichita Falls, TX
Carol S. Dass, It’s Nice Here!, Aunt Lucy’s Doll House, Columbia, MO
George E. Holroyd III, No. 2 from the series 33 Meters Squared, Paris, France 

Maja PilipovicTransAmerica Building, San Francisco, CA













Yvette Meltzer, The Heart of Chicago, Lake Michigan, Chicago, Illinois 



Born
and raised in Chicago, I returned after 21 years of living in other
locales. In 45 years of living in the city I have always been within an
easy walk of the lakefront.  Lake Michigan and the lakefront parks are
for me the heart of the city.




Deena Feinberg, Lost in Her Own World, Hudson, NY

Kimberly Strom, untitled, Challex, France 
Anna Kress, No Title, Oporto, Portugal
Vicky Stromee, Gabby’s Vigil, Tucson, AZ
Danielle L Goldstein, Sunset Tryst at the Beach,  Westport, CT
Mona Chughtai, Midwestern Sunset, Madison, WI




Tama Hochbaum, Coker Arboretum, Chapel Hill, NC








Tracey N. FreemanTree Performing, Houston, TX 




Mark Kalan, Picnic Table Rockland Lake, Valley Cottage/Rockland Coutnty/NY








Ali DonnellyCoal and Hills, Ashland, Kentucky


Marla
H Bane
, It
Used To Be Bigger, Patterson, NJ
409 E 40 Street,
Paterson, NJ 07504 – http://goo.gl/maps/Swmvy
I was home for a high
school reunion in June, 2011 and drove around Paterson, New Jersey – my
hometown.  I hadn’t been there for many years.  I went to see my
elementary school, high school, the synagogue we went to, the park I hung out
at where I became a pseudo-hippie, Sunshine’s Deli, Ben & Bob’s,
Passaic Falls, Johnny & Hange’s, where Toby’s used to be, the Bonfire,
my grandfather’s store King’s on 21st Avenue, the library on East 33rd Street
where dreams were made and most of all the home I grew up in.  I drove up
and down my street.  I knew the street number but I could not recognize the
house I lived in for over 10 years.  I kept looking at it but refused to
believe this was once my grandparent’s home, where my mother grew up and where
we moved to from Forest Hills, Queens when my grandparents downsized (before
that was a word in our vocabulary).  I stood outside my rental car wanting
to ring the doorbell but couldn’t.  Instead I cried and for a moment
everything stopped and it was as it used to be.  I could see everyone up
and down our block and everything was as it used to be so many years ago.  I
left when I went away to college in Washington, DC and a few months later my
father died and my mother sold the house and moved.  It used to be white
with black trim and it used to be bigger.
 







Susan Barnett, Under Contract, North Jersey, 2012












Gerhard Clausing, Laguna Spirits, Laguna Beach, CA 









Gary Wirstad, Philadelphia Morning, 30th and Chesnut Streets, Philadelpha, PA








Wayne Swanson, Laurel St., San Diego, CA






Suzanne 

Révy, The Climbing Tree behind Kimball’s Ice Cream Stand, 2011, Carlisle, MA













Heather OelklausDrury Lane, LeGrand, IA



Winky Lewis, Queen Elizabeth in Portland, ME, Portland, ME

Roger Carl Johanson, Brother and Sister, Queens, Jackson Heights, NYC






Dale Niles, The Center Theater, Lenoir, NC







Randy Karg, Antique Dealer, Clarinda, IA

Martina Jackmuth, Ruralurbanindustrialpastoral, Mainz, Germany


CONTINUE TO PART 2


CONTINUED
Amy Fichter, Roller Skating, Shenandoah, IA
Trisha Barry, Early Morning Light, Nichols and Stone, Gardner, MA



                Mary Anne Mitchell, Piedmont Park Festival, Atlanta, GA




Hans BrooymansNever a dull moment on the way to the dentists’ office, Almere (The Netherlands)









John Lawrence, Guam Cir., Cypress, CA




Stan Banos, Battery Park, NYC

Garry Loughlin, Columb’s Barracks, Mullingar, Ireland
Keith Dannemiller, San Judas Rides the Metro, México, DF, México 
April Rocha, Station 26, Santa Monica, CA
Sarah Bilotta, Erin’s Cornfield, Hollis, NH

Diane Cockerill, Windshield Tourist. Los Angeles, CA 






Kimberly Edwards, Second Line Season, New
Orleans, LA






Darrell Lecorre, My Neighbors, Mission, British Columbia, Canada
Harvey Hanig, Free TV 107 Dee  Road, North Aurora, IL

Andi SchreiberSummer’s Idyll, Scarsdale, NY 
Mitchell Hartman, On the Platform, Queens, NY
Jim Marz, My New Home Town, Crestline, CA
Gary Haigh, Parked Car,  Adelaide, South Australia    
CONTINUE to PART 3

CONTINUED
Bill Ward, Glasgow Rain, Glasgow, Scotland 
Michael Barath, Art Walk, Canton, OH
Sarah PollmanGardening from the series Instagram Poetry, Boston, MA 


Joel Butler, City Center,
Las Vegas, NV

Emma Powell, My First House, Middlebury, VT




Frauke Langguth,  Berlin Reichstag playground, Berlin, Germany



This is well known spot
in Berlin, the Reichstag building, now the seat of the German parliament
Bundestag. I like the atmosphere in the picture and in reality –
although the building is the centre of German politics, you can still
play soccer on the grass in front of it.  In the background you can spot
two building cranes, which is also very typical for Berlin for the last
two decades.








Karen Baker, hometown1, hometown2, Venice, CA





Bea Fresno, RTM, Rotterdam, The Netherlands



Bruce Morton, My Home Town, Bowen, IL





Jason Neely, Middletown, Middletown, CT 


Kathy LeistnerBanks of the Abash, Lafayette, IN
I took this photograph when I came back to my hometown to help my Mom after
she had heart surgery.  I grew up a few blocks from the Wabash River and in
college I rowed on it with crew team at Purdue.  Flooding from the
river every spring is part of life in West Lafayette/Lafayette.  Every day
the river is different and always worth the time to look at it. The Battle of
Tippecanoe took place about 7 miles outside of West Lafayette and it was an
important waterway for the Native Americans in this area.



Shawna Gibbs, Laurel St., Claremont, NH 
Eric Breitenbach, The Family Of Trayvon Martin, Sanford, FL    

Jane GottliebSanta Barbara Mission Fire (2010), Santa Barbara, CA

Bill Chapman, Dream, Cambridge, MA  


Marco Bucchieri, Fog # 9, Pieve di Cento (Bologna, Italy)

Christa Blackwood, Austin, TX


Karen Carson, Bob’s Drive-In, Toluca Lake (Burbank) CA  


Panos Lambrou, Samos Town, Samos, Greece
Here is a photo of my home town Samos Town, Samos, Greece. The house I
lived in as a child is the two story house at the bottom left by the
sea. I took my very first photograph on the second floor balcony of that
house when I was 10 years old with a Agfa box camera.
Kevin McCollister, March 22, 2012, Los Angeles, CA

Barrry Steven Greff, Lone Tree at Sunset, Weston, FL 
Robert Schlaug, Spalt, Germany
Alicia Goodwin, Cinema Five, Portsmouth, New Hampshire
I kissed my first boy in that theater!
Marisa Sciabarrasi, Entrance, Portsmouth, NH 
Ryan SegediThe world in your mailbox, Savannah, GA

Tom Paiva, Sewer to the Sea, Los Angeles, CA (Playa del Rey) 



Lauren Grabelle, Gunther in the Grass, Bigfork, MT

Russ Rowland, Brooklyn Blue, New York City
Adam Neese, Map of Memories, Grapevine, TX


Laura Glabman, Untitled, Far Rockaway, NY


CONTINUE to PART 4

CONTINUED

Hans Bauer, Navasota,Texas, Navasota, TX
John A. BenignoNarberth Holloween, Narberth, PA
Stacy Swiderski, Peak, Fords, NJ 
Vicki Hunt, The Magic City, Birmingham, Alabama 2012  
Carol Isaak, River-front Beach, Portland, OR

Luca Baldassari,
roma.piazza.campo.de.fiori , Rome, Italy

Pekka Nikrus, Helsinkipolis 5, Helsinki, Finland
Francesca YorkeRed Hollyhock, Santa Fe, New Mexico
Bob St. CyrLanding PlacePonteix, Saskatchewan, Canada 
Joel Rhymer, The Mill Pond after the Snow, Freedom, NH
Robert Moran, Misty Morning, Bar Harbor, Maine
Lesley Treloar Helston, Cornwall, UK
Robert Katz, Balloon Fiesta, Albuquerque, NM 
Brandon Edwards, Tech Cominco-1,Trail, BC, Canada 
Nicole WhiteMassasoit, 2012, Plymouth, MA

Mariya UstymenkoColour Red / Jubilee Day St. Osyth, Essex, UK

Thomas Locke HobbsPalm, Dr. Dinuba, CA  


Oscar Ciutat, Lightfield, Barcelona, Spain
K.B. Dixon, Towers, Portland, OR






Raul Guerrero, Land’s End, San Francisco, CA
Sandy Carson, swing park, Newmains, Scotland

Donna Rosser, Sammy T’s, Fredericksburg,
VA







Eleonora RonconiLa Recoleta Cemetery,
Buenos Aires











Beth Herzhaft,The
View Out My Window
, Los Angeles, CA










Thomas KittelReturning Home, Approaching JFK- NYC








Kathleen B. Donovan, Beating the Heat at the Mall,
Dallas
, TX





Michael Cannon, Lakeshore
Stroll
, Southampton, Ontario, Canada














Olivia Callender, Old Scar from the series The Objective Life, Roosevelt
Island, NY




Rhonda Prince, Springs Theater, Tampa, FL



Jim Ford, Mixed Emotions, Blanchester, OH





Hannah Reynolds, The July Racecourse, Newmarket, Suffolk, UK





 Miroslav Vrzala, Abstract Shadows, Monroe, NY

Sietse PostmaNinepins, Bovenkarspel, Holland



Darragh Mason FieldBonnie’s Café, Bristol UK




Tom Griscom, Tennessee River, Chattanooga, TN








.




























Erika Ritzel, Old
Terrier Track, Carbondale, IL



Randy JenningsTrust, Kingsport, TN

Laurie McCormickLa La Land, CaliforniaWest Los Angeles, CA



Paul Melhado, Queens County #1, Queens, New York


Allen Griggs, Can I be Helped, Nashville,TN
(Church St. downtown)




Patty Carroll, Shadow Statue, Park Ridge, IL
Ivan B. Palli, Corstorphine Hill, Edinburgh, UK 
Linda Alterwitz, Vegas My Hometown, Las Vegas, NV
Valery RizzoPin-up Girls, Brooklyn, NY

Mindi L Headrick, Louise, Hoxie, KS



Jonathan MorsePool, Honolulu, Hawaii



Jim Neuner, Walking the Dogs, Asheville, NC  


Aline Smithson, Liberace, Hollywood, CA




Thanks to Cleo Scheoplein for her assistance.

2012 LENSCRATCH Americana Exhibition, Part 2

Asia Kepka, Tattoo Girl, Brockton, MA
Cynthia Bittenfield, Star-Spangled Fashion, Chicago, IL
Christian ArrecisFormer Maple Park Village President, Glenn R. Kahl, Maple Park, IL
 Karl Baden, L Street bathhouse, Boston MA
Michael SakasegawaGrandpa, Salinas, CA
During World War II, my grandfather fought in a segregated unit for a country that had interned his entire family.  He died almost five years ago, still a proud American.

Hans Bauer, Parade, Fredicksburg, TX

Rafael Malave-Rios, One Way, Juneau, AK 

Ashly StohlPolar King, Coalville, UT

Aline Smithson, Flag Day, Los Angeles, CA

Lauren Grabelle, County Fair, Monmouth County, NJ

Sandy CarsonSpring Break, Seattle, WA

Kathy Vukasovich, Montana Spirit, HWY 89,  between Gardiner and Livingston, Montana July 2011

Diane Pirie Cockerill, Southwest Americana, Tubac, Arizona

Daniel MirerStanding in a Picturesque Landscape, Connecticut

Shawna GibbsDragster, Claremont, NH

K.B. DixonRally, Portland, OR





         Fran FormanMy friend Azalea, an American,  Sebastopol, California


Deborah YunA Nation of Immigrants, San Francisco Chinatown, CA

Dan Younger, Travel Places, Battery Park, NYC

Francis DiClemente, Tattered Flag, Oneida County, NY 
Darryl Baird, July 4th parade, Granbury, Texas
Aimee HertogWashington and Mr. B, Philadelphia, PA

Beth Herzhaft, Untitled Area Photograph, Chinatown / Los Angeles
Kelly WrageHoosier Apple Pie, Swarthmore, PA



Trisha BarryUnTold Stories, Reitta Ranch Flea Market, Hubbardston MA




Robert MoranLeather Basketball, Bar Harbor, ME

Ryn Clarke, The Two Hats, Dubois, WY

Cynthia WoodJames Dean (Artist Choice), Cabazon, CA

Freya KruczenykThinking of New York, New York City, NY

Harvey HanigMemorial Day Parade Geneva IL, Geneva IL 

Laird M. Bindrim, Beach Watchers, Ocean City, NJ 

James Zall, Stuff, Searsport, ME

Chris Falter, Let the dogs out, New York, NY 
Claire Mallett, All American Cookout, New Orleans, LA
Mark Hobson, Welcome, Baimbridge, NY 
Laura Glabman, Uncle Sam, 2012, Lake George, NY
Terri Gold, The Mermaid Parade, Coney Island, NY

Bill Chapman, Beale Street, Memphis, TN

Rita NanniniBetty With Flag, Montauk, NY


Semantha Raquel Norris, The Morning After, Lower East Side, NYC, NY

Jamie Johnson, Peace, Los Angeles, CA


Linda PlaistedLittle Miss USA, Mt. Airy, Maryland


Kelly Trisch, Fifteen Racks and a Flag, Caro, MI 


Janet Mesic-MackieCowboy of Faith, Pendleton, OR

Yvette Meltzer, On the Road, Federal Hwy 421 en route to Boone, NC

CONTINUE to the next post…click on OLDER POSTS to continue

Edge of Vision Exhibition Traveling to Oregon

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    Installation shots at Aperture Gallery, New York, 2009 by Elliot Black Photography

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The photographic process is often credited in part with displacing representation from painting, pushing it over the course of the first half of the last century further into the domain of abstraction. The camera was commonly thought to capture and document a supposed objective reality in a way the human hand never could. However, photography itself has also been variously employed for nonrepresentational abstraction since its inception.

From the very first photograms to Aaron Siskind‘s ab-ex alluding macrophotography, to Penelope Umbrico‘s digitally-manipulated found images of “Suns From Flickr,” The Edge of Vision: Abstractions in Contemporary Photography (on view at Schneider Museum of Art in Oregon through June 16, 2012) examines the history of nonrepresentational photographic image-making and its role in contemporary art.

In a two part video interview, independent writer and critic Lyle Rexer, who curated the exhibition and authored the 2009 Aperture-published book by the same title, says he was drawn to artists that “were making pictures that moved away from from an easily identifiable subject, or that complicated the picture or the response that we normal have to pictures, in what is essentially thought of as a denotative medium.”

The traveling exhibition, which has been on view in a number of places around the world, each time in a slightly different iteration, features work by a diverse group of contemporary artists including Bill Armstrong, Carel Balth, Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, Ellen Carey, Roland Fischer, Michael Flomen, Manuel Geerinck, Edward Mapplethorpe, Penelope Umbrico, Silvio Wolf, and more listed here. For Rexer, he says, bringing this group together and seeing what they have in common is meant to address the following question:

What is it about photography now that makes it possible for us to have artists that  on the one hand do very documentary work, and other artists at the same time, sometimes the same artists, who are also doing work that would qualify as abstract?

For more information on the work on view, be sure to check out the Edge of Vision Video Interview Series, conducted during the installation at Aperture Gallery in 2009, on vimeo:

  • Penelope Umbrico persents her work “For Sale/TV’s From Craigslist,” and explains why she considers herself a documentary photographer, “a traveler through media.”
  • Ellen Carey discusses her large-scale work “Pulls with Lifts and Drops,” film pulled through the rollers of a Polaroid large-format camera, and her color photogram, “PushPins,” exploring how each challenges the viewer to rethink the medium.
  • Barbara Kasten explains her work based on physical constructions that play with light and are created only for the purpose of being photographed. By this approach, the photograph itself becomes the object and is removed from being representative or documentary.
  • Silvio Wolf presents his work which combines straight photography and the unexposed ends of film rolls as negatives exposed to light. The end results are mesmerizing and meditative colorful images about light and absence of light.
  • Bill Armstrong puts in context his “Mandala #450″ piece, explains why he uses blurring as a process and explores his “painterly approach to photography.”
  • Charles Lindsay speaks about how he started working with his unique carbon emulsion process, his inspirations and the combination of his photographic, video and sound works.
  • Seth Lambert contextualizes his work in the show “Nothing on the Bed of an Epson Expression 10000XL” within his Failures series of grids mapping out anything from beard hair, mirror pieces to nothing with a blank scan.
  • Carel Balth explains the process behind his works “Moving IV” and “Madrid V,” and how his appropriation of images through a digital format functions as a new medium.
  • Jack Sal speaks about his piece “Sale/Sala (Salt/Room)” while you watch him installing it.
  • Manuel Geerinck, who started his career as a painter, speaks about his unique process combining his drawings that he then photographs in motion.

Also, watch a panel discussion on Abstraction in Photography from 2009 at the Hammer Museum at UCLA, moderated by Rexer, and read a review of the exhibition when it was on view at Lewis & Clark College in Portland earlier this year, from the Oregonian.

Exhibition on view:
Thursday, May 10 – Saturday, June 16, 2012

$5 Suggested Donation

Schneider Museum of Art
1250 Siskiyou Blvd
Ashland, Oregon
(541) 552-6245

Gilbert & George: “Two Men, One Artist”

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    Bloody Life, 1975

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    Black Church Face, 1980

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    Hellish, 1980

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    Finding God, 1982

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    Winter Flowers, 1982

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    Youth Faith, 1982

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    Fear, 1984

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    Here, 1987

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    One Way, 2001

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    Mass, 2005

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

When Gilbert Proesch and George Passmore staged one of their first moving sculptures at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam in 1969, they began a performance that has never ended. The duo met while studying at St. Martin’s School of Art and embarked on what is now a 45-year collaboration, an eccentric, independent perpetual ‘happening,’ exploring what art historian and curator Robert Rosenblum called, “the singularity of their duality.”

On Tuesday, April 3, 2012, dawning customary deadpan expressions, the duo will bring what the UK’s Independent calls “their seamless double-act, walking in step and talking in antiphon, all clothes, habits and opinions synchronised, [sic] all sentences prefixed by a regal ‘we’,” to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum for a conversation with novelist and cultural historian Michael Bracewell.

Together known as one Gilbert & George, they’ve produced an enormous body of visceral, often provocative photography-based work—art independent of any school or movement, art of everyday modern urban life, as they deem with their slogan, “Art for All.” Contrary to the work of many contemporary blockbuster artists, their aim is “to speak across the barriers of knowledge directly to the people about their life and not about the knowledge of art.”

George and Gilbert with Gilbert & George: The Complete Pictures, 1971 – 2005

They manipulate images of architecture, lurid graffiti, shop windows and most often themselves on exceptionally powerful computers in their home studio and print on massive, mural-sized panels, 200 of which made up their monumental 2007 retrospective occupying the entire forth floor at Tate Modern, the largest exhibition by a living artist there yet. In collaboration with Aperture Foundation, Tate Publishing also released a unique, two-volume retrospective monograph joined in one carrying case designed and produced by the artists, Gilbert & George: The Complete Pictures, 1971–2005.

In their time together, Gilbert & George have taken tens of thousands of photographs virtually all within walking distance of their East London flat for their art of everyday life. As they often claim, “Nothing happens in the world that doesn’t happen in the East End.” With subject matter covering what the Guardian coupled as “nudity,  bondage, bad language and turds,” and series titles such as Cunt Scum, Naked Shit, New Horny Pictures and Drunk with God, their work has attracted alternatively the outrage and adoration of the media.

Some question it as pure shock value, though Gilbert & George refute this claim, suggesting to the Independent, “We want to un-shock people, and bringing these subjects into the open, allowing them to live and breathe, should un-shock.”

In a four-part video tour of their studio, they say furthermore:

Each of our pictures is a kind of visual love letter from us to the viewer and it is the space between the picture and the viewer that makes art, the thoughts and feelings that go through the person when examining the picture.

Their aim is to confront the viewer with some kind of morality, ambiguous or otherwise, but never to impose. Rather, they explore it together with the viewer.

“We are not sending them to heaven or hell,” says Gilbert in another video interview. “We are sending them,” laughs George, “to the bar instead.”

 

Second Annual Robert Rosenblum Lecture:
Gilbert & George in Conversation with Michael Bracewell
Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at 6:30 PM
SOLD OUT

Standby tickets may be available if space allows. Please call the Box Office at (212) 423-3587 for more information. $10, $7 members, free for students with a valid ID.

Solomon T. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY 10128

August Sander/Boris Mikhailov

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1929 © August Sander / 2008 © Boris Mikhailov

Exhibition on view:
March 22–May 5, 2012

Pace/MacGill Gallery
32 E 57th Street
New York City, NY
(212) 759-7999

Two seminal practitioners of the camera are side-by-side in Pace/MacGill’s current exhibition, German Portraits.

From 1910 through 1956, documentary photographer August Sander, strove to make a visual index of the population classifying Germany’s most conventional groups: The Farmer, The Skilled Tradesman, The Woman, Classes and Professions, The Artist, The City, and The Last People. This monumental project turned into the masterpiece, People of the 20th Century, featuring over 600 images. Twenty portraits by Sander will be shown in this exhibition, each striking a rare symmetry of the individual and an illustration of the archetype, forming a sincere social portrait of the time.

Ukrainian-born Boris Mikhailov has photographed Germany’s middle class. Nearly a century after August Sander, Mikhailov focuses on the distinct appearance of the individual and the transmission of physical traits from parents to offspring. He captures his subjects against a dark backdrop, taken in profile, inviting us to contemplate line and form and what it means to be German in a literal and physical sense.

Mikhailov is featured in Aperture issues 190 and 158. Aperture also published August Sander: Masters of Photography.

 

 

Lost & Found: 3.11 Photographs from Tohoku

Lost & Found: 3.11 exhibition at Hiroshi Watanabe Studio in Los Angeles (c) Lost & Found Project

This month of March brought the passing of the one-year anniversary of the devastating tsunami which hit the coast of Japan in 2011, laying waste much of the region, in some cases washing away entire villages and causing upwards of 20,000 deaths. Since the disaster, relief efforts came in a variety of forms, but one which humanizes the numerical abstraction of the death toll stuck out in particular.

In the current Aperture magazine issue 206, photography critic and independent curator Mariko Takeuchi writes:

In the cities, towns, and village affected by the disaster, a vast number of personal photographs were salvaged, pulled from underneath rubble and mud by all sorts of people. They were discolored by saltwater and covered with dirt; some were misshapen or even emitted foul odors. With very few exceptions, it was impossible to identify the people who had made the photographs, their subjects, or their owners—if indeed they were still alive.

What began as a small community effort has turned into the Memory Salvage Project, a volunteer organization that has to date recovered and begun restoring 750,000 lost family photographs.

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“Restoration is not just a matter of infrastructure,” Professor Kuniomi Shibata, head of the Memory Salvage Project, says in a video for Discovery Channel, “There are other important things.”

Snapshots were cleaned, numbered and digitized one by one with the help of volunteers who came from all over Japan. At least 20,000 photographs, and 13,000 photo albums have been returned to their owners. Several thousand other images abstracted by natural disaster have been assembled into an evocative and visually stunning traveling exhibition which has been on view in Tokyo and Los Angeles, and is now coming to New York.

Photographer Munemasa Takahashi, one of the leaders of the project tells New Yorker’s Photobooth why the images on view are so powerful:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs… Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

Lost & Found: 3.11 Photographs from Tohoku will be on view at Aperture Monday, April 2, 2012 – Friday, April 27, 2012.

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
547 W. 27th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10001
(212) 505-5555