Tag Archives: Museum Of Photography

Mary Beth Meehan, Suzanne & Eli

Mary Beth Meehan, Suzanne & Eli

Mary Beth Meehan

Suzanne & Eli,
Brockton, Massachusetts, 2010
From the City of Champions: A Portrait of Brockton, Massachusetts series
Website – MaryBethMeehan.com

Mary Beth Meehan is a Providence-based photographer whose work explores issues of identity, culture, and community. Her current series, City of Champions, looks at the changing post-industrial U.S. through the eyes of her hometown of Brockton, Massachusetts. The series is featured in the current issue of 6Mois Magazine and will be exhibited at the Griffin Museum of Photography in January, 2013. With support from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities, twelve photographs from the project were printed as 14-foot banners and mounted on buildings in Brockton’s distressed downtown core, sparking community-wide conversations about evolving urban identities, community dislocation, and the possibilities for social change. Her work has been published in 6Mois, LeMonde, DoubleTake, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Boston Sunday Globe. Meehan teaches at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.

Clarissa Bonet

I was recently in Chicago for the Filter Photo Festival and was happy to attend the opening of the Light Exhibition at the David Weinberg Gallery, jurored by Matthew Avignone and David Weinberg.  The walls were filled with compellingl images and in the center of all that goodness, were the images of Clarissa Bonet.  Her stark and cinematic look at uban spaces were beautifully executed and I wanted to see more.

Clarissa received her M.F.A. in photography from Columbia College Chicago and her B.S. in Photography from the University of Central Florida. She is currently an adjunct photography teacher at Harrington College of Design. Her work has been exhibited national and internationally. She was the recipient of the Albert P. Weisman grant for two consecutive years. Her work is in the collection of the South East Museum of Photography and Calumet Photographic. She has most recently won PDN’s the Curator; search for undiscovered fine art photography.

 City Space 

The urban space is striking. Its tall and mysterious buildings, crowds of anonymous people, an endless sea of concrete constantly intrigue me. City Space is a ongoing photographic exploration of the urban environment and my perception of it. I am interested in the physical space of the city and its emotional and psychological impact on the body. 

These photographs reconstruct mundane events in the city that I have personally experienced or witnessed in public. Stark light, deep shadow and muted color are visual strategies I explore to describe the city. I use the city as a stage and transform the physical space into a psychological one. The images I create do not represent a commonality of experience but instead provide a personal interpretation of the urban landscape.

Pelle Cass

I am a long time fan of Pelle Cass’ work.  His photographs are inventive, conceptual, and manage to reinterpret what is right in front of us by using multiple images to create new realities.  Pelle just opened a show at Gallery Kayafas of his new project, Strangers.  These portraits are made up of numerous close-up photographs, when combined, reveal minutely observed facts add up to something new and strange. The exhibition runs through November 24th, 2012.

Pelle has had solo shows in the Boston area at Gallery Kayafas, Stux Gallery, the Griffin Museum of Photography, the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University, and Harvard’s Fogg Museum print room. He has also had solo shows at the Frank Marino Gallery, NYC and the Houston Center for Photography in Texas. His work is owned by the Fogg Art Museum, the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Polaroid Collection, the DeCordova Museum, Lehigh University Art Galleries, the Peabody Essex Museum, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. He was Winner: Top 50, Critical Mass, Photolucida, Portland, OR, in 2008 and 2009, and was awarded Yaddo Fellowships (Saratoga Springs, NY) in 2010 and 2012. He was born in Brooklyn, NY, and lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Two of my favorite series are Selected People and Pins.  In Selected People, Pelle “orders the world and exaggerates its chaos.” Taking dozens of photographs of the same location, he selects what color palette or point of view he wishes to present. With Pins, Pelle rephotographs images from Architectural Digest and covers them with pins to create a new way of looking at space.


image from Selected People 

image from Pins

Strangers:
I think of these pictures as non-portraits. They say nothing of the personality or psychology of the people who sat for them, even though they are very detailed and closely observed. So why bother? At first, I was simply curious about what a portrait is. I thought it might be revealing to remove the variables of personality and identity from the portrait. 

 The sitter is basically unrecognizable, even though each picture is nothing but a set of photographic facts about that person. This emptying of identity happens when, after taking dozens of extreme close-ups of a particular person’s face, I blend the fragments into a new face. The shiny noses, wrinkled foreheads, and swirls of hair, take on a strange intensity when reassembled. 

 My aim is to use extreme photographic precision in a spontaneous, almost messily expressionistic way, to discover, perhaps, a whole new set of human emotions housed in a new anatomy, but also to discover something about the nature of the photographic portrait.


Review Santa Fe: Keliy Anderson-Staley

Over the next month, I will be sharing the work of photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  


Keliy Anderson-Staley was raised “off the grid” in Maine, received a BA from Hampshire College in Massachusetts and an MFA from Hunter College in New York and currently lives and teaches in Arkansas. She has been making wet plate collodion tintypes for eight years.

Her new project, [Hyphen] Americans, refers to the hyphenated
character of American identities (Irish-American, African-American,
etc.), while only emphasizing the shared American identity.
These portraits compose a broadly inclusive portrait of
America. “With each portrait I hope to capture a powerful likeness, which
I then title only with a first name. Each portrait is revealing but
anonymous. Each is also uniquely representative of an individual but not
of a particular group. Therefore, although the heritage of each
individual might be inferred from assumptions we make about features and
costumes, the viewer is encouraged to suspend the kind of thinking that
would traditionally assist in decoding these images in the context of
American identity politics.”


Keliy has been awarded a Howard Foundation Fellowship , Light Work residency and fellowship, New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, Puffin Grant, and a Bronx Museum AIM residency. Solo exhibitions of her tintype portraits have been installed at the Light Work Gallery in Syracuse, NY, the Palitz Gallery in NYC, the Southeast Museum of Photography, the California Museum of Photography, John Cleary Gallery in Houston and a number of university galleries around the country. Keliy has exhibited widely arcoss the US.

Keliy will have a  “tintype portrait booth” set up at both the Chicago expo through the Catherine Edelman Gallery September 20-23rd and in New Haven in October. (Sittings are free and open to the public) She will also have work at the DC Fine Art Photography Fair in Washington DC, from October 5-7th at the Rebekah Jacob Gallery.

[Hyphen] Americans is a series of tintype portraits made with chemistry mixed according to nineteenth-century recipes, period brass lenses and wooden view cameras. Composed of thousands of portraits, the project is a broadly diverse collection of American faces. Each individual in the project–identified only by a first name–defiantly asserts his or her selfhood, resisting any imposed or external categorizing system we might bring to these images.

At once contemporary and timeless, these portraits raise questions about our place as individuals in history, and the role that photographic technologies and the history of photography have played in  defining identity.

Joni Sternbach, 07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty

Joni Sternbach, 07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty

Joni Sternbach

07.08.23 #1 Ditch Jetty,
Montauk, New York, 2007
From the SurfLand series
Website – JoniSternbach.com

Joni Sternbach was born in the Bronx, New York. She graduated from New York University/International Center of Photography (ICP) with an M.A. in Photography in 1987. She was part of the adjunct faculty at NYU for over 20 years, and is currently a faculty member at ICP and CAP workshops teaching wet plate collodion. Sternbach uses early photographic processes to create contemporary landscapes and seascapes. Her photography has taken her to some of the most desolate deserts in the American West to some of the most prized surf beaches in the world. Her solo exhibition, SurfLand, which captures portraits of surfers in tintype, has exhibited at the Peabody Essex Museum and Blue Sky Gallery and will be on view at the Southeast Museum of Photography in 2012. A monograph of the SurfLand images was published by Photolucida in 2009. She is represented by Rick Wester Fine Art in New York City and Edward Cella Art and Architecture in Los Angeles.

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin

Displaced 1,
Nova Scotia, Canada, 2007
From the Displaced series
Website – LaurenHenkin.com

Born in Washington, D.C, Lauren Henkin grew up in Maryland and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in architecture from Washington University in St. Louis. She states, “My work focuses on answering the question, What will last? I work from the inside out, using internal narrative as the foundation in which to produce objects that reinterpret space, light and form found in the external.” Henkin is an educator, reviewer, writer, frequent speaker, photolucida advisory board member, author of numerous books, and active member in the photographic community. Her work is widely collected by private collectors as well as institutions such as Southeast Museum of Photography, Yale University and Dartmouth College. Her work has been published in numerous journals on photography and the book arts. She is a Px3 multi-category winner, Oregon Regional Arts & Culture Council grant winner, with other award nominations in both the Brink Emerging Artist and Contemporary Northwest Art Awards."

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin, Displaced 1

Lauren Henkin

Displaced 1,
Nova Scotia, Canada, 2007
From the Displaced series
Website – LaurenHenkin.com

Born in Washington, D.C, Lauren Henkin grew up in Maryland and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in architecture from Washington University in St. Louis. She states, “My work focuses on answering the question, What will last? I work from the inside out, using internal narrative as the foundation in which to produce objects that reinterpret space, light and form found in the external.” Henkin is an educator, reviewer, writer, frequent speaker, photolucida advisory board member, author of numerous books, and active member in the photographic community. Her work is widely collected by private collectors as well as institutions such as Southeast Museum of Photography, Yale University and Dartmouth College. Her work has been published in numerous journals on photography and the book arts. She is a Px3 multi-category winner, Oregon Regional Arts & Culture Council grant winner, with other award nominations in both the Brink Emerging Artist and Contemporary Northwest Art Awards."

Christopher Colville, Impact

Christopher Colville, Impact

Christopher Colville

Impact,
Yuma County Arizona, 2010
From the Instar series
Website – ChristopherColville.com

Christopher Colville was born in 1974 in Tucson Arizona. After receiving his BFA in Anthropology and Photography from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and MFA in Photography from the University of New Mexico, he returned home to the Sonoran Desert and is currently living in Phoenix, where he is a visiting Assistant Professor at Arizona State University. Christopher’s work has been included in both national and international publications as well as recent solo and group exhibitions at the Griffin Museum of Photography, Rayko Photo Center, The center for Photography at Woodstock and the 2012 Noorderlicht Photo festival. Recent awards include the Humble Art Foundations 2009 New Photography Grant, an Arizona Commission on the Arts Artist Project Grant, a Public Art Commission from the Phoenix Commission on the Arts as well as an artist fellowship through the American Scandinavian Foundation.