Tag Archives: Museum Of Fine Arts

Lydia Panas, Maria + Corinne

Lydia Panas, Maria + Corinne

Lydia Panas

Maria + Corinne,
Kutztown, Pennsylvania, 2012
Website – LydiaPanas.com

Lydia Panas is an award-winning photographer whose work has been exhibited widely throughout the United States and abroad, and has won numerous awards. She was one of nine International Discoveries, Houston Fotofest in 2007. Her work is included in numerous collections, including Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Brooklyn Museum, and Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago. Lydia has degrees from Boston College, the School of Visual Arts, New York University/International Center of Photography, as well as an Independent Study Fellowship from the Whitney Museum of American Art. Lydia has taught photography at a number of institutions, including The Museum of Modern Art, Lafayette, Muhlenberg and Moravian Colleges, Kutztown University, The Maine Media Workshops, The Vermont College MFA program, and the Baum School of Art/Lehigh Carbon Community College.

Frederic Weber, Ab Ovo

Frederic Weber, Ab Ovo

Frederic Weber

Ab Ovo,
, 2012
From the Gravitas series
Website – FredericWeber.net

Frederic Weber lives and works in Nyack, New York. His photographs have been reproduced in publications including Art + Auction, Aperture, Flash Art, The New Yorker, The New York Times and more recently, The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection (Aperture, 2011). Weber’s artworks are represented in several museum collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the George Eastman House, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, as well as many private collections such as Manfried Heiting, Bill Hunt and Fred Bidwell.

Brian Finke, LSU “Untitled”

Brian Finke, LSU “Untitled”

Brian Finke

LSU “Untitled”,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 2012
From the LSU series
Website – BrianFinke.com

Brian Finke’s work is included in several permanent collections including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Akron Art Museum, the Worcester Art Museum, the Saint Louis Art Museum, the Bibliotheque Nationale de France, and the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Arts in Japan. He was nominated for the International Center for Photography’s Infinity Award in 2004 and won a prestigious New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship the same year.

Articles | November 2012

Some interesting articles and reviews from the past two months.

Afghan policemen patrol during an operation near the border with Pakistan ©
Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

Observer: : The Month in Photography | The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books

Sara Hussein: Tweeting from the front line (AFP blog)

Freelance photographer Phil Moore has been filing great work for AFP from Kivu region in Democratic Republic of Congo (I’ll share links to some of the work later this week)… Was fascinating to read about his experiences working in DRC on the AFP’s Correspondent blog…

Photo © Phil Moore / AFP

Phil Moore: ‘I love you very much, that is why we are here’ | Phil Moore on working in DRC

Robert King on working in Syria…

Photo © Robert King

Vice: The Man Who Was There | Robert King has been covering the FSA so long they named him ‘Haji Memphis’

Why we need war correspondents.

Terry Anderson:  Running Toward Danger | ‘Why the world still needs war correspondents.’

New York Times: Using War as Cover to Target Journalists

WaPo and NYT public editors on ‘controversial’ Gaza photos…

Washington Post: Photo of dead baby in Gaza holds part of the ‘truth’

New York Times: Photo Caption Should Have Been Better. But ‘Orwellian’? No. | NYT’s Public Editor defends Tyler Hicks’s Gaza photo caption.

Not your average war correspondent… crazy story…

Sunil Patel: I Went to Syria to Learn How to Be a Journalist…And Failed Miserably At It While Almost Dying A Bunch of Times (Vice)

“Attack—Eastern Front WWII,” 1941, © Dimitri Baltermants, Russian, born Poland, 1912-1990.

PDN: War Correspondence | ‘This month the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH) will open an exhibition that promises to change the way photographs of war are seen, understood and written about.’

FT: War and Peace 

Lightbox: War/Photography by Geoff Dyer

Lightbox: This Means War: A Look at Conflict Photography

Telegraph: The unique advantage of female war reporters in Muslim countries

Wired: HBO’s Witness Goes Inside the Pulse-Pounding World of Conflict Photographers 

Fast Company: HBO’s “Witness” Looks At The World’s Deadliest Places Through The Lens of Photojournalists

Photo © Sara Terry

Lens blog: Coming to Terms With the Legacy of War | The Aftermath Project, Putting Together Its Fifth Book

Wired: War Reporters Train in the Bronx, Complete With Blood, Smoke and Gunfire

Cover photo © Ben Lowy

Forbes: Why Time Magazine Used Instagram To Cover Hurricane Sandy

Kenneth Jarecke: Instagram, the Devil, and You (photographer’s blog)

Kenneth Jarecke: Great Job, You’re Fired (photographer’s blog)

Fast Company: An Intimate Portrait Of Innovation, Risk, And Failure Through Hipstamatic’s Lens

Jon Levy: Foto8 is Leaving Home

Five interesting articles from Guardian’s 80 page supplement ‘Photography Masterclass’ from a week or so ago…

Photo © Antonio Olmos

Antonio Olmos: Street Photography (Guardian) ‘Trust your instincts, be brave and alert to every possibility and wear sensible shoes – all that pavement pounding will pay off eventually …’

Martin Argles: Photojournalism (Guardian) Even as technology advances, the role of the photojournalist will remain the same: to expand our awareness of the world

Suki Dhanda: Portrait photography (Guardian) |A powerful portrait must connect the viewer to the subject. Beyond technique and timing, observation and empathy are vita

Eamonn McCabe: Landscape photography  (Guardian)| Good landscape photography does not require epic surroundings – beauty can be found on your doorstep if your eyes are open to it

Guardian: Photography: an ever-evolving art form | Our photography critic examines the changing landscape of a thriving medium

Petapixel: Photojournalists Reflect on Documenting Obama’s Reelection Campaign

Wired: Photographs Are No Longer Things, They’re Experiences

Business Insider: Photographers Will Soon Be The Most Valuable People In The News Room

Lens blog: An Inside View on Documentary Stories

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.25: The politics of the individual against the white backdrop (David Campbell’s blog)

Guardian: Magnum Revolution – review | ‘Magnum photographers provide a compelling visual record of violent uprising from Budapest 1956 to the Arab spring’

Evening Standard: Seduced by Art: Photography Past and Present 

Guardian: Photography: is it art? | | ‘From the earliest days of photography, practitioners took their inspiration from paintings. But as a new exhibition at London’s National Gallery shows, the link went both ways’

Guardian: Light from the Middle East offers a true reflection of a complex region | ‘A new exhibition at London’s V&A offers insights from within cultures that are more often photographed and reported from the outside’

Harlem, New York, 1947 © Henri Cartier-Bresson

Guardian: Henri Cartier-Bresson: who can beat the master of monochrome? | ‘An exciting new London exhibition pits Henri Cartier-Bresson, famous for eschewing colour in his photography, against some of the best colour photographers of our time’

ABC News: AP Photographer Walt Zeboski Dies at Age 83

Petapixel: Canadian Photogs Now Officially Own the Copyright to All of Their Photos

Guardian: Enrique Metinides: photographing the dead for Mexico’s ‘bloody news’

PDN: Photographers on Their Favorite Image from Robert Frank’s The Americans

Lightbox: The Americans List: A Salute to Robert Frank

PDN: 8 Dos and Don’ts for Crowd-Funding Campaigns

PDN: How to Survive and Conquer Portfolio Reviews

MediaStorm Field Guide

ADWeek: Time Moves to Responsive Design

BJP: Kodak releases iPhone app for professional film photographers

BJP: Inaugural Photoreporter festival finances photographers

Forbes: Do Not Trust This Joel Sternfeld Photograph

Photo Brigade: Holiday Photo Gift Guide 2012

Visual Culture Blog: London Photography Map

Guardian: The best photography websites, publications and galleries

Lens blog: An Outsider’s Life in Pictures and Boxes | The Still Unfolding Legend Vivian Maier

© Doug Ricard

Lightbox: Street View and Beyond: Google’s Influence on Photography

Lightbox: From Photography to Film: Stanley Kubrick Enters the Ring

Lightbox: The Bechers on Display at Paris Photo

LA Observed: LA Times wins $266,000 from photographer David Strick

Telegraph:  Portraits of a woman | ‘What makes a portrait of a woman unforgettable? We asked eight leading female photographers to identify their favourite.’

BBC: Photographer Dody Weston Thompson dies aged 89

Art Daily: Phillips de Pury & Company announces highlights from its London November Photographs Auction

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber, Record Player

Matthew Gamber

Record Player,
Boston, 2003
From the Countrypolitan series
Website – MatthewGamber.com

Matthew Gamber (b. 1977) holds a BFA from Bowling Green State University, and an MFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts / Tufts University. Recent exhibitions include: Second Nature: Abstract Photography Then and Now, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012 The 2012 deCordova Biennial, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Lincoln, MA, 2012; Flash Forward 2011 Exhibition, Magenta Foundation, Toronto, CA, 2011; The Sum of All Colors, Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York, 2011. Awards include: Traveling Fellowship, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2011; Humble Art Foundation, New Photography Grant, 2011; Grant Recipient, LEF Foundation, New England (awarded for Big RED & Shiny), 2007 & 2005.

This Means War: A Look at Conflict Photography

“War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath,” is a huge, tough-minded and very moving new show at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. It lays out the ways cameras have been put to use during 165 years of world wars, undeclared hostilities and barely organized fang baring. Cameras turn out to be the transformer tools of warfare, adaptable as battlefield aids for reconnaissance and surveillance, as peerless instruments of propaganda and, above all, as a means to witness the atrocious facts of war. You may not be able to end war with a camera, but you can do a lot of useful things with one — even tell the truth.

Instead of being organized chronologically, the Houston show suggests that war is better considered as an eternally recurring narrative. It divides its story into chapters, from prewar buildup through postwar remembrances, with wars from all periods combined in each. The weaponry evolves from sabers to torpedoes to rocket-propelled grenades. (For the record, sharpened steel is forever.) The photo equipment changes from 19th century box cameras to cell phones and satellites. But the fundamentals of war — brutality and suffering, grief and self-sacrifice — don’t change much. They haven’t since the first time a caveman figured out how to use a rock.

The main problem for war photography today is image overload. The tidal wave of pictures all around us, with every cell phone adding to the deluge every day, threatens to make even atrocity photos into just more pictures, as morally weightless as the movie stills they so often resemble. For all that, the scores of unforgettable pictures in “War/Photography” make clear that even in a world that contains too many pictures, pictures of war, the best ones, still have the power to stir your emotions. They may not be able to compel any particular judgment about the wars they represent, but they can insist that attention must be paid. After that, if photos by themselves can’t stop war — and they can’t — then the fault is not in our pictures but in ourselves.

(MORE: Read more of Richard Lacayo’s take on the show.)


WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath is on view at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston until Feb. 3 and will then move to Los Angeles, Washington and Brooklyn.

Richard Lacayo is an art critic and editor-at-large at TIME.



Europe Week: Oleg Videnin

Guest editor, Jacqueline Roberts shares a week of European photographers, today with Oleg Videnin. A huge thank you to Jacqueline for her insight and efforts. 
Oleg Videnin was born in Bryansk (Russia) in 1963. Trained as a forestry engineer, he eventually worked in newspapers, radio, and television, becoming a member of the Russian Union of Journalists. His childhood interest in photography grew into a full-fledged passion in the late 1990s, his work has since gained international recognition. Oleg has had solo exhibition in Russia, Serbia, Australia, and the United States, and has been featured in numerous magazines. His photographs are included in the collections of the Moscow Museum of Modern Art and the Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow, as well as in private collections in Russia and abroad.
Oleg lives with his family in Bryansk.
Russians
“I was going round the world searching for an interesting place, when I realized that the place that I was in was already interesting.” Emmet Gowin 

Jacqueline states: When I first saw Oleg’s work I was riveted by the strong connection that exists between him and the people he photographs. Like an August Sander, Oleg has been meticulously photographing his region, his town, his people and his neighbours. Young and old, men and women, jubilant and despondent, communities and outsiders… his work is very much local and documental. Yet it is the universal dimension and the emotional quality of his portraits that keeps me coming back to his images….

Andy Freeberg, Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley

Andy Freeberg, Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley

Andy Freeberg

Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley,
, 2010
From the Art Fare series
Website – AndyFreeberg.com

Andy Freeberg was born in New York City where he learned at an early age to be a critical observer of the world and the people in it. He studied at the University of Michigan, began his career as a photojournalist and now concentrates primarily on fine art projects. Freeberg has recently emerged on the contemporary art scene as a wry commentator on the art industry itself. Long fascinated with the gallery and museum worlds, he often turns his camera on the dealers, gallery patrons, artists, museum guards, and their interplay with the works of art on view. His project Guardians, about the women that guard the art in Russian museums, won Photolucida’s Critical Mass book award and was published in 2010. The Guardians will be on view at the Cantor Museum at Stanford University through January 2013. His series, Art Fare, documenting another side of the art world, will open at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles in September 2012. Freeberg’s work is in many public and private collections including the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Portland Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.