Tag Archives: Museum Of Art

Thomas Bouquin, Mur de garrigue

Thomas Bouquin, Mur de garrigue

Thomas Bouquin

Mur de garrigue,
Poulx, France, 2012
From the Lou Mistrau series
Website – ThomasBouquin.com

Thomas Bouquin was born in Lyon (France), and lives and works in Montréal (Québec), where he is currently completing a BA in photography at Concordia University. He is mainly interested by the relationship between man and the landscape, especially how elements such as memory, space and light can influence and modify our perception of these places. His work has been exhibited in the Art Matters Festival 2012, and in the VAV Gallery. Also, he is the co-author of a serie of zines called Montréal-Paris, exhibited in 2012 in DIY: Photographers & Books at the Cleveland Museum of Art, in ABC : MTL at the Canadian Center of Architecture, and are part of different public book collections such as La Chambre Blanche (Québec), and The Maison Européenne de la Photographie (Paris).

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren, Running 005824

Tabitha Soren

Running 005824,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

Latin America Week: Guillermo Srodek-Hart

This week, Argentinean photographer Eleonora Ronconi is taking over as guest curator, featuring work created by Latin American photographers…

Guillermo es el quinto fotógrafo de la semana, y ya sólo queda uno…

Guillermo Srodek-Hart is an Argentinean photographer, who grew up and lives in Buenos Aires. His series Stories is about old stores that are located in rural areas. Nostalgia runs very strongly in the Latin DNA, and I think his series is a perfect example of this. Every time I look at these images, I remember what these places smell like and how people dressed at the time even though they are not present in these photographs. They transport me to a different place and time… 
Guillermo has an MFA from Mass College of Art in Boston, MA. He has been exhibited in many venues around the world, and his work has been published by O Globo, Fotografia Argentina, Boston Globe and Art Matters Magazine and several Argentinean newspapers. He is part of several collections such as the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Attleboro Museum of Art and Fundación Petrobras. In the United States he is represented by Dina Mitrani Gallery in Miami, Schneider Gallery in Chicago and Gallery Kayafas in Boston.

Image from Stories
What
does your Latin heritage bring to your work?

I
discovered my Latin heritage while living in Boston as un undergrad
at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. The questions about my
origin and my identity came when I was far from them. But I don’t see
myself Latin in the way I photograph. On the contrary, I feel closer
to FSA photographers. If I were living in some other place I would
probably be drawn to the same subject matter. 

Do
you see a difference between work created in Latin America and work
created in the States?


I
am not sure, because there is so much information coming and going
all the time that the influences cross over constantly. But I do see
that there is less of an academic influence here than in the US.
Here, still, people who want to learn photography have to figure out a way
to make it work for them, as opposed to the huge structure that the
Art Schools offer to a student in the US, where it is a safer environment (while you are enrolled). After graduation, it is a whole
different story. I think there is a lot of regurgitation going on in
the US Art Schools but I also think this is inevitable.  


What
is the state of photography in your country–is it well supported,
are galleries selling, do Photographers have an outlet to show their
work?


There
is a lot of interest in the medium, and there are great venues to
exhibit. There are also excellent teachers and very talented young
and not so young photographers. But I think the market is not very
good here. People will fill up a gallery at the opening, then
throughout the month it will be very visited, but perhaps there are
no sales. And now the dollar is crazy here so I dont know what will
happen. A lot of collectors from abroad come here to buy cheap and
good work.

Images from Stories

 I
drive to the small rural towns in the Argentine countryside to get
away from what I know. For me, being uncomfortable stimulates
creativity. When I enter unknown territory, I stop, get out, and talk
to people. I tell them I am interested in old stores, places that
still function almost in a separate time, those that remain
authentic, running on their own agendas.
 
I
want to find places that remain authentic, that are running on their
own agendas. Sometimes I think I am photographing the last rebel’s
strongholds, or artists’ studios, because these places seem to
operate by a different set of rules.  When I run out of words, I
take my folder out and show prints of previous shots I’ve taken, like
a detective sharing evidence. 
I
am looking for places like these
,
I ask while flipping through the photographs.  My project takes
on a collaborative nature because I rely on these interactions, the
people I meet point me to new locations, and that’s how I build my
itinerary.
 
Many times
I am asked ‘Why aren’t there any people in your photographs?’ 
My answer
is ‘Look closely, they are all over the place.’
 
My
photographs are filled with traces of human presence: objects,
furniture, stuff hanging from the walls, accumulations on display.
They speak to me of the invisible, that which can’t be seen but is
there, stories to be imagined, and, ultimately, the acknowledgement
of our own transience in this world.



Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren, Running 004907

Tabitha Soren

Running 004907,
, 2012
From the Running series
Website – TabithaSoren.com

Tabitha Soren was born into a military family and grew up all over the world. Snapshots were one of the few ways she had to remember the details that made up her life in the last town or base — so she took them incessantly and spent many afternoons cataloguing them. She headed to New York for college where she received a BA in Journalism and Politics at New York University. After a career in television news shooting 30 frames a second, Soren decided she wanted to concentrate on one frame at a time and spent a year studying photography at Stanford University. Over the past ten years, her projects have been published in The New York Times Magazine, Canteen, Vanity Fair and New York, among others. Soren's work speaks to the twists of fate in life that can unhinge us. Her pictures address what havoc human beings can survive — and what they can't. Public collections include the Oakland Museum of Art, in California, the New Orleans Museum of Art as well as the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, both in Louisiana. Her Running series debuted at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Indianapolis this summer.

Mike Sinclair, Bandstand

Mike Sinclair, Bandstand

Mike Sinclair

Bandstand,
Ames, Iowa, 2012
Website – MikeSinclair.com

Mike Sinclair is an architectural and fine art photographer living in Kansas City, Missouri. His photographs are frequently published in the Architectural Press and elsewhere, including the New York Times, Metropolis, Architectural Record and Interior Design. His work is in several public and private collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City; and the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, also in Kansas City. He is represented by Jen Bekman Gallery.
 

Review Santa Fe: Alejandro Cartagena

Over the next month, I will be sharing the work of photographers who attended Review Santa Fe in June.  Review Santa Fe is the only juried review in the United States and invites 100 photographers to Santa Fe for a long weekend of reviews, insights, and connections.  

Alejandro Cartagena‘s name may sound familiar as his work has been well recognized over the past several years. He lives and works in Monterrey, Mexico and Alejandro’s photographic focus has been examining the social, urban, and environmental landscape of a contemporary Mexico.  His work has been exhibited internationally and is in the collections of several museums including the SFMoMA, MoCP, and the Portland Museum of Art. Cartagena has received the Photolucida Critical Mass Book Award, the Lente Latino Award, and the Premio IILA-FotoGrafia 2012 Award in Rome. He was named a FOAM TALENT in 2012 and a PDN 30 in 2010. His work has been published in Newsweek, Nowness, Domus, the Financial Times, Le Monde, Stern, The New Yorker, and Wallpaper among others.
His new work, Car Poolers, examines the phenomenon of transportation of workers in Mexico.

CAR POOLERS: These images are a rare view into how Car Pooling is practiced by workers in Mexico, their working condition and suburban sprawls consequences upon these workers everyday life. Even though the workers are not conscious of the ecological impact they may have by traveling this way, they are a silent contributor to the preservation of our city and planet.

Justyna Badach, Phil

Justyna Badach, Phil

Justyna Badach

Phil,
Pennsylvania, 2008
From the Bachelor Portraits series
Website – JustynaBadach.com

Justyna Badach’s work has been exhibited internationally and is included in the collections of Museet for Fotokunst Brandts, Odense, Denmark. Cranbrook Museum of Art and The Center for Photography,Woodstock. She is the recipeint of numerous grants and awards including: The Independence Foundation Artist Fellwoship, The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and The Leeway Foundation. Her work is represented by Gallery 339 in Philadelphia.

Martin Parr: Picturing the American South

The High Museum of Art commissioned Martin Parr to document Atlanta as part of its Picturing the South project—a series of artist commissions that engage with the American South. Channeling his unparalleled ability to collate humor, wit, and curiosity into his heavily socio-cultural photographs, Parr captured the oddities and eccentricities of contemporary Americana.

British-born Parr, whose photography career spans over 30 years, is known for his provocative documentary style by using cultural criticism through an exaggerated and humorous light. His analysis of how we live is not simply satire, as Parr offers his audience an approach to seeing which acts not to denounce, but to highlight (both aesthetically and thematically) patterns between people, the things we consume and the milieus in which we live.

The outcome of the museum’s commission offers a vivid, comedic and touching perspective on the diversity that lies in Atlanta. Parr covers a large body of subject matter in his findings, which ranges from the high and low—juxtaposing images from a gallery opening to an oddly lengthy corn dog on a stick. Parr’s images offer insight which would only be found through the lens of a meticulous and curious outsider.

Beyond the exhibition at the High Museum of Art, Italian publisher Contrasto released a book, Up and Down Peachtree: Photographs of Atlantaand a documetary, Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South. The book, a meticulously edited and impeccably designed object in its own right, is printed without text beyond the book’s title and colophon—which, undeniably, is a testament to Parr’s talent for storytelling. The documentary is a 60-minute lens behind the lens where documentarian Neal Broffman followed Parr photographing around Atlanta. The documentary includes interviews with noted curators, writers, critics and photographers, and offers a look into at Parr’s real-life affable personality and interactions with his subjects. Below, Contrasto has given LightBox an exclusive clip on the documentary:

Martin Parr’s photographs are on view now through September 9, 2012, as part of Picturing the South: New Commissions from the High Museum of Art. Up and Down Peachtree and Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South are both available for purchase online.