Tag Archives: Movie Theatre

Update on 500 Photographers

Dear readers & followers,

After a silent period I thought it was time to let you know what is going on at 500 Photographers so you know what to expect the coming months and ofcourse to let you know when the remaining 45 photographers will be posted.
500 Photographers has been asked by Guatephoto, a photo festival in Guatemala city in November, to create a projection that will be shown at the new gallery of La Fototeca. In the converted movie theatre they will be placing four large screens projecting the work of this website and three other well respected and known websites simultaneously. Currently I am curating and producing the projection to make something that should make some jaws drop. Throughout the city there will be exhibitions including work from acclaimed photographers as Roger Ballen, Maleonn and Erwin Olaf.

At the same time I’m looking for the remaining 45 photographers that will be featured on this website to complete the list as well as creating things to be done after the website is completed. If you still want to suggest yourself or someone else you believe should be included: now is the time. Check the suggestions page and send me an e-mail. Make sure the photographers you suggest are truly special image makers with a clear signature.
As quality has been my highest priority throughout the process of creating this website, I’m not yet going to pinpoint the exact moment when the photographers will be posted on here, however, it should not be too long from now. I’m excited about the festival in Guatemala, and excited to be finishing 500 Photographers.

To make sure you don’t miss the moment when 500 continues you can subscribe to the rss feed above or like the facebook page.
For those people going to Guatephoto: it would be wonderful to meet you.

Friendly greetings, Pieter Wisse

Harlem Revisited: A New Look at Dawoud Bey’s New York Portraits

Present-day Chicago is not Harlem in 1979. Present-day Harlem isn’t even Harlem in 1979. But at the Art Institute of Chicago’s new exhibition Dawoud Bey: Harlem USA, some things have stayed the same. The show comprises the 25 original prints from Bey’s noteworthy 1979 exhibition of the series at the Studio Museum in Harlem, plus five previously unpublished prints from the same era.

Dawoud Bey

Smokey, 2002

The impetus for Harlem USA, which was made throughout the 1970s, was Bey’s visit to the Harlem on my Mind show at New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1969; it took him ten years to start and finish the work. And although the images in the show don’t superficially resemble Bey’s later work—they are small, made with a handheld 35mm camera, impromptu and monochromatic, unlike the later work seen at right—the photographer says that the series contains the seeds of his later work. “They gave me my initial sense of how to engage people in front of the camera,” Bey told TIME in an email. “I first learned how to translate the physical experience of the human subject into compelling photographic form during the years I spent making pictures in Harlem.”

He is not the only one who sees the thread running through his work. Matthew Witkovsky, a curator at the Art Institute of Chicago, says that some artists show from their first work a strong sense of who they are and what they want to do. Bey, according to him, is one of those lucky people.

Dawoud Bey

A Boy in Front of the Loews 125th St. Movie Theatre, Harlem, NY, 1976

And Witkovsky says that the photographs, though they remain unchanged, are still fresh. “[Bey] managed to take that ability that cameras have to give you total specificity and imbue it with some kind of other-time-other-place quality,” he says, pointing out an example: in Bey’s picture of a boy outside a movie theater, seen at left, the clothes are quintessential 1970s but the pose is a classic contrapposto. “It’ll always be timely,” says Witkovsky, “because it’s a little bit out of time.”

Bey, who now lives in Chicago, says the photographs themselves are not the only constant. “My feelings about the work haven’t really changed,” he says. “I am still concerned with trying to make resonant photographs of ordinary people.”

Dawoud Bey is a Chicago-based photographer and professor. See more of his work here.

Dawoud Bey: Harlem USA will be on view at the Art Institute of Chicago from May 2 – Sept. 9. The Renaissance Society in Chicago will also present a retrospective of his work, entitled Picturing People, which includes the later work featured in this post, from May 13 – June 24.

Sergey Novikov

Russian photographer, Sergey Novikov, has a number of terrific series, two that I am featuring here. Sergey was born in Cheboksary, Chuvash Republic, in the USSR and as a teenager began taking photographs with the family cameras. After hitchhiking across Europe, and photographing a huge story about hitchhikers, his camera and all the film were stolen in Poland, so his next trip to Brazil was without a camera, but he still had the urge to capture the visual world. After a move to Moscow, Sergey worked as a video editor and graduated as a photo editor at the Rodchenko Moscow School of Photography and Multimedia. For the last three years he has been making work about Russia, but also finds time to travel the world.

The first body of work, FC Volga United, follows soccer teams named after the Volga River, the second project, Breathless, takes a look at movie theaters in Moscow and Saint Petersburg, many that are now transformed into flea markets, discos, and houses of worship.

FV Volga United: This story, bordered by river banks, is about the places and people beside the longest European river, the Volga. I have looked at them through the prism of soccer there is a common passion here in Russia and particularly in those tiny towns on the Volga. I have travelled along the river and visited the games of 9 teams who took their name from the river. So they are all FC Volga from different russian regions. I have discovered many backgrounds, many interesting personalities.














































































































Breathless: I prefer absorbing movie to fattening popcorn.As well I am ready to shuffle in an armchair to feel atmosphere of an old movie theatre. Unfortunately, movies already quited them, having left buildings for holidays fairs, discos and “Jehovah’s Witnesses” sect. Apocalyptic movies lovers set afire and destroy these buildings day by day. The few remained. It will be possible to buy a large Coke on their place soon. So, some temporarily abandoned movie theaters, Russia.