Tag Archives: Monocle

Alexi Hobbs

Some photographers are born story tellers.  They make work that feels like a visit with an old friend, or a relative who is sharing memories of a life lived–a scrapbook of images that tell our stories.  Alexi Hobbs is one of those photographers. He has the gift of the narrative and brings us along on his insightful explorations of place and family.  His project, Hunters and Heirs, looks at family traditions and shared experiences that stem from a time of need, not want.

Alexi is a fine-art and editorial photographer from Montreal. He has shot editorial work for publications such as Time, Monocle, Dwell, enRoute and Afar. His prints have been fortunate enough to have graced the walls of galleries in Canada, the United States and even a museum in Russia. Most recently he has been selected as a winner of the Magenta Foundation’s 2012 Flash Forward Emerging Photographers competition.

Hunters and Heirs: In 1941, my grandfather, Antonio ‘Pit’ Allard deserted the army to avoid fighting in World War II. He spent four years in hiding on the Gaspesian peninsula and four winters isolated in the forest, working alone as a lumberjack, living off beans and lard. He broke the monotony by trapping hare and shooting partridges. This was a time when hunting was a means to a very vital end, not a weekend hobby. It was a way of life and a source of food.  

When the war ended, Pit settled down in the city, started a family and moved on. However, he never gave up hunting. It reminds him of who he is, where he comes from and why he is still here today.

My grandfather is known for his storytelling. His stories, based both in historical fact and myth, have become part of our family’s identity. They tell of time spent in the wild and many of them find their origin in these hunting trips. In October of 2009, I followed him into the woods, not only to document part of my family’s history, as a photographer, but also to become part of it by actively participating in what would undoubtedly be added to the library of folktales, recounted at the next family gathering. I went to document my family during this transition and to remember who we are, where we come from and ultimately, the reason we are all here. 

Daniel Shea, Warren

Daniel Shea, Warren

Daniel Shea

Warren,
, 2011
From the Blisner, Ill. series
Website – DanielPShea.com

Daniel Shea is an artist based in Chicago. His long-term photographic work about the coal industry, Coal Work, was recently presented as a solo exhibition in Switzerland and has been shown internationally, including the Moscow Museum of Modern Art and Asia Society in Beijing. He is currently showing sculptures and installations at LVL3 Gallery in Chicago and will be showing new photographs as part of a solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in October 2012. He is currently in a long-term artist residency program at Columbia College Chicago working on his first monograph, Blisner, Ill. Daniel splits his time between working on the road or in the studio, teaching through various community arts initiatives, and taking assignments for publications including Dwell, The Fader, Wired, The Atlantic, TIME, and Monocle.

Max Sher, Nikita Beketov, 21, student, fan of the series Brak po Zaveshaniu (Marriage by Will)

Max Sher, Nikita Beketov, 21, student, fan of the series Brak po Zaveshaniu (Marriage by Will)

Max Sher

Nikita Beketov, 21, student, fan of the series Brak po Zaveshaniu (Marriage by Will),
, 2012
Website – MaxSher.com

Born in St. Petersburg, raised in Siberia and educated in Siberia and France, Max Sher took up photography in 2006. His work (personal and commissioned) has since appeared in Courrier International, Monocle, Esquire (Russia), le Monde, Libération, Ogoniok, Independent Magazine, Afisha, Bolshoi Gorod, Russian Reporter, Snob, GEO Traveler, Foto8, Private, Newsweek Japan, etc. and was exhibited in St.Petersburg, Vienna, Moscow, Bratislava, among others. Max was nominated for KLM Paul Huf Awards in 2008. He is currently based in Moscow.

Max Sher, Untitled

Max Sher, Untitled

Max Sher

Untitled,
Atyrau, Kazakhstan, 2011
From the Landscapes series
Website – MaxSher.com

Born in St. Petersburg, raised in Siberia and educated in Siberia and France, Max Sher took up photography in 2006. His work (personal and commissioned) has since appeared in Courrier International, Monocle, Esquire (Russia), le Monde, Libération, Ogoniok, Independent Magazine, Afisha, Bolshoi Gorod, Russian Reporter, Snob, GEO Traveler, Foto8, Private, Newsweek Japan, etc. and was exhibited in St.Petersburg, Vienna, Moscow, Bratislava, among others. Max was nominated for KLM Paul Huf Awards in 2008. He is currently based in Moscow.

Andres Gonzalez – Somewhere

 

Andres Gonzalez was on a seemingly ideal photo trajectory. He was selected for the PDN 30 class of 2006 and was a 2007-2008 Fulbright Fellow. His clients included Newsweek, Monocle and Time. But not everything was sunny and f16

This series started soon after I left the photo agency I was with about a year and a half ago. They had submitted a series I made in Ukraine to an Italian magazine, and when I translated the text I found that they had rewritten some of my statement to give it a newsy slant. That really made me angry and soon after that I decided to leave the agency. It pretty much amounted to wanting more control over my work and how it was presented. That was the catalyst that pushed me to start putting this project together. The idea of storytelling has always been problematic for me, especially after moving abroad. For a long time I forced myself to tell other people’s stories because thats what journalists are supposed to do. Now I really just want to learn to see through my own eyes, to find my center and find a balance between being intentional and being open to the world. Looking for pictures has always been a form of meditation and I want my work to reflect that. Maybe that’s a bit soft, or perhaps even self-indulgent but thats really what I’m looking for. I love how quiet the world gets when you engage in deep observation. There is a loneliness there and I’m intrigued by that kind of beauty. I guess I want to believe there is room for everything.

SOMEWHERE

The passenger steps out onto the overcast deck and remembers a line. Soft was the sun. The wind to his back, he is facing the stern and an endless trail of thoughts drifting away from him towards the horizon. He wants no words, only to enjoy the delicate anticipation of a moment waiting to reveal itself. What are the limits of language? This is the mind, felt, not spoken. He makes a photograph of a seagull, and does not resist the emotion that brings.

There is a town passing by on the starboard side of the ship, the mind-boggling, awe-inspiring, crazy-making, world of people. He is happy for the distance, but knows that the idea of separation is an illusion. Everything exists according to the laws of nature. There is a core, it seems. The sea turns grey for a moment, the lights from the town slowly dimming, overtaken by fog. He makes another photograph of the fading light, the soft presence of time. The ship begins to slow, ahead a port, another journey.

Andres Gonzalez spends most of his time in Istanbul, Turkey but is spending Fall 2011 teaching at the Salt Institute for Documentary Studies in Portland, Maine.

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Jeff Mclane

I’ve been doing a lot of traveling lately and one of the treats of air travel is to fly into Los Angeles at night. Looking down on a metropolis of lights, spreading and sprawling into unlimited vistas is slightly mind blowing and makes one realize that the future is now. Los Angeles photographer, Jeff Mclane has captured a sense of that night time landscape focusing on communities surrounding the Port of Los Angeles, offering a glimpse of a terrain tightly bonded with the energy of the nearby industrial structures. Jeff will be sharing six of these large scale photographs in an exhibition, Effulgence, at the Angels Gate Cultural Center in San Pedro, CA opening on May 15 and running through August 14th, with an opening reception on May 15th from 1:20-4pm.

Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1984, Mclane received a BFA from California Institute of the Arts. His work has appeared in such publications as The Collector’s Guide to New Art Photography Vol. 2 and Monocle magazine. In 2010, he was commissioned by the Humble Arts Foundation to produce work for Manual Transmission, which was exhibited in Brooklyn, New York and Miami, Florida. The series, Thirty six Medical Marijuana Storefronts is featured below. His project, Property Lines, was featured on LENSCRATCH in 2009.

The images from Effulgence offer a new perspective of the harbor communities, depicting how towns like San Pedro, Wilmington and Palos Verdes are tied to the visual landscape of the Port of Los Angeles. The generated light from the port, is a constant reminder of the solid presence of the industrial network, and becomes even more apparent during the night hours.

Images from Effulgence

Jeff offers familiar foreground objects such of street lights, residential homes & highway roads; all while being contained in an immense brilliance of commercial trade and industry. These indications of the power and resources surrounding the communities, give insight to how these communities maintain function, and therefore exist in their own active surroundings.

Thirtysix Medical Marijuana Storefronts, Los Angeles, CA was created with the support of Humble Art’s Manual Transmission exhibition.

The choice to photograph medical marijuana dispensaries presented itself as a very current condition of the city. It is a topic in the midst of both revolution and introduction. Legal marijuana now has physical spaces in the city, which give proof to the litigation, and eventual legalization of itself. Now part of the public community, this developing topic has justification, and perhaps (eventual) normalcy.

By choosing to photograph these spaces, I have access to a new landscape, which is photographically untouched. Framing this subject, and visually ordering the storefronts, is in a way an attempt to find order and control to this somewhat socially unrefined topic.