Tag Archives: Miranda

Guest Blogger 5 – Forward Thinking: Hotshoe looks ahead to 2013 on the World Photography Organisation blog


Hotshoe covers from 1980s to present day

For my final guest post before Christmas at the World Photo Organisation and to mark the end of the year and the start of a new one, I asked the team at Hotshoe magazine to look ahead to 2013, rather than back at 2012, to comment on any trends in the world of photography and to pick out some up-coming events, photographers and works to look out for.

If you ever wondered who we were and about the history of this independent publication (first published in 1979) then follow this link Forward Thinking for some photos, comments and photos. There’s also a pre-Christmas competition to win a year’s subscription to Hotshoe magazine, just LIKE Hotshoe International Facebook page this week, see the end of the WPO post for details.

Enjoy the run up to the holidays and here’s wishing you all a healthy, happy holiday.

Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers Tagged: Bill Kouwenhoven, Gregory Barker, Hotshoe International Contemporary photography magazine, Hotshoe iPad app, Melissa Dewitt, Miranda Gavin

Guest Blogger 3 – Join Hotshoe Blog’s conversation On the Move: Mobile Photography at World Photo Organisation


The Great Escape © Janine Graf

Ansel Adams said it best: “There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept”. Janine Graf from interview


Welcome back to my fourth post leading up until Christmas. Today I turn to the world of mobile photography with the help of Joanne Carter from The App Whisperer to find out more. What’s clear is that mobile photography is here to stay; it’s fun, there’s a growing community of like-minded people getting involved and it allows people to shoot and edit on the go, giving them greater freedom than using a DSLR.


(L-R) Joanne Carter and Miranda Gavin Hotshoe Blog at the mObilepixatiOn show. Image by Dilshad Corleone (Columnist for theappwhisperer.com)

Before this, there are two things to mention. The Sony World Photography Awards, which is judged in late January, is viewed on screen and it makes no difference what type of equipment is used to produce submitted photographs. However, the competition asks photographers to note the cameras used in their submissions. One of 2011’s finalists, Balazs Gardi followed Afghani troops and edited his work with hipstamatic. I’m trying to get stats as to how many submissions are produced on mobile devices as I would like to monitor this in relation to international photo competitions. Also, I have a suggestion for the Sony World Photography Awards. What about adding a Mobile Photography category to next year’s awards?

Secondly, as it’s the lead up to Christmas, here at Hotshoe magazine we’re offering one person a year’s subscription to the magazine, plus a free copy of the Oct/Nov 2012 edition of the magazine sent to your home. All you have to do is go to the Hotshoe International Facebook page and LIKE the magazine by the end of the week. That’s it. The team at Hotshoe will select a winner at random from those ‘liking’ the page this week and I will announce the lucky winner next week on this blog. Happy Christmas.

To read interviews with some of the key players in the world pof mobile photography and photo art click on this link On the Move – Mobile Photography, to the rest of the post. You won’t be disappointed, there are some very interesting points made by the interviewees.

Filed under: Mobile Photo Art, Mobile Photography, Photographers, Portraiture, street photography, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Janine Graf, Joanne Carter, Miranda Gavin, Mobile photo art, Mobile Photography, mobilepixation, The App Whisperer

Guest Blogger – Join Hotshoe Blog discussing creativity over on the World Photography Organisation Blog

Today and for the next few Wednesdays, I’ll be guest blogging over at the World Photography Organisation Blog starting with my first post, Creativity and Photography: Partners in Time. To whet your appetite, I’ve included the intro from the post.

To read more and see the full post, click on the link above in bold.

“In order to create, we have to stand in that space between what we see in the world, and what we hope for…” Julie Burstein, TED talk.

“Creativity lies at the heart of producing any photographic or artistic work. But it is not limited to these areas, it exists everywhere. I believe that we all have that potential to be creative within us, we just need to find the space and opportunities to allow ourselves to be open and free to play. For my first post on the WPO blog, I want to share some ideas with you about creativity in the hope that you all feel inspired to go forward and create…”

Filed under: Photographers, Photographers blogs Tagged: creativity, Julie Burstein, Miranda Gavin, Photography, World Photography Organisation

Brighton Photo Biennial 2012 – Trevor Paglen’s Geographies of Seeing show podcast with Lighthouse director Honor Harger

Lighthouse director Honor Harger. Photo © Wendy Pye

Social scientist, artist, writer and provocateur Trevor Paglen uses photography to explore the secret activities of the U.S. military and intelligence agencies. For me, Geographies of Seeing was one of Brighton Photo Biennial’s to-see shows, not least for Paglen’s multi-dimensional approach to his subject matter. Who could resist taking time to look at the work of someone who is described as a ‘provocateur’, especially as I first saw some of this work at Frieze art fair a few years ago and was intrigued back then.

On the press tour of the show I got a chance to discuss the work with Lighthouse director Honor Harger who provides an informed and articulate insight into Paglen’s work in the audio podcast below. Click on the link below and then again on the link, it goes green as you rool over it, in the next page. It is 17mins 26secs long.


Trevor Paglen Geographies of Seeing Photo © Wendy Pye

“The Other Night Sky uses data from an international network of amateur satellite watchers to track and photograph classified spacecraft. Echoing the efforts of historic astronomers, Paglen documents astral movements that don’t officially exist.

Trevor Paglen Geographies of Seeing Photo © Wendy Pye

“In the series Limit Telephotography Paglen adapted the super-strength telescopes, normally used to shoot distant planets, to reveal top-secret U.S. governmental sites, sometimes 65 miles away from his camera; covert bases, so remote they cannot be seen by an unaided civilian eye from any point on Earth.

 Show photos above. Photo © Miranda Gavin

“Paglen coined the term “Experimental Geography” to describe practices coupling experimental cultural production and art-making with ideas from critical human geography about the production of space, materialism, and praxis. His work, such The Other Night Sky has received widespread attention for both his technical innovations and for his conceptual rigour. He is also author of three books including Torture Taxi (2006), the first book to comprehensively describe the CIA’s extraordinary rendition program, I Could Tell You But Then You Would Have to be Destroyed by Me (2007), which is a look at top-secret military programmes, and Blank Spots on the Map: The Dark Geography of the Pentagon’s Secret World, which is a broader look at secrecy in the United States.

Honor and I at the show. Photo © Wendy Pye

“Paglen (born in 1974) is an American artist, geographer, and author, currently based in New York. His work deliberately blurs lines between science, contemporary art, journalism, and technology to construct unfamiliar, yet meticulously researched ways to see and interpret the world around us. He has been exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Tate Modern, London; The Walker Arts Center, Minneapolis; The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Institute for Contemporary Art, Philadelphia; The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams; the 2008 Taipei Biennial; the Istanbul Biennial 2009, and numerous other solo and group exhibitions.” From press release. Presented and curated in partnership with Lighthouse.

Filed under: Artist Talks, Photographers, Photography Festivals, Visual Artists Tagged: brighton, Brighton Photo Biennial 2012, experimental geography, Geographies of Seeing, Honor Harger, Lighthouse, photo show, space photography, Trevor Paglen

Open Vote – The European Bank of Reconstruction and Development puts staff photo competition images to online vote

If you fancy yourself as a judge and want to make a vote, follow the link to 50 photographs submitted to an annual competition arranged for staff working for the European Bank of Reconstruction and Development.

This is the fourth year of the internal competition and I had the pleasure to help judge the winners with photographer, author and publisher Anthony Osmond-Evans who recently published Spirit of London a coffee-table book documenting “the changing seasons, personalities and cultures” making up today’s London. The standard of entries was high and both Anthony and I found it difficult at times to choose between images.

Over 800 single images were submitted in five categories to the competition. To cast your vote, follow the link to the Facebook EBRD Peoples’ Choice page. “Photos taken by our staff capture people, landscapes and events from our region and beyond. ‘Like’ the images that impress you the most and help us select the very best of 2012″ from 50 photos.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Awards & Competitions, Photography Books, Photography Shows Tagged: Anthony Osmond-Evans, European Bank of Reconstruction and Development, Miranda Gavin, photo competition, Spirit of London, staff photo competition

Photo Tips – Portfolio reviews advice, comments and tips from photographers and reviewers

As promised yesterday, here’s the link to the PDF version of the above feature which first appeared in F2 freelance photographer magazine (Aug/Sept 2010).

I hope it helps photographers plan so that they can make the most of their precious funds and time. There are more than a few tips shared by the interviewees about planning for a review, attending the review and following up.

F2 Portfolio Review feature

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Festivals, Portfolio reviews Tagged: advice, F2, F2 freelance photographer magazine, Miranda Gavin, photography portfolio reviews, portfolio review, tips

Call Out – London-based collective Jur•nl seeks online responses and collaborators for experimental research zine

Wonder Valley, California, April 2012. Photo Miranda Gavin

It’s a beautiful hot day in the UK so only a short post about a call I received from a collective asking for a contribution. I was more than happy to contribute a photo I took recently in Wonder Valley California as a stimulus. Since I sent it in, I’ve checked the website and some of the responses, both images and text, are intriguing and have got me thinking about the image again. This is the cyclical nature of work, you make it, look at it, re-look at it, have someone else look at it, and perhaps, in some small way, one’s initial response shifts.

I want to suggest to the collective that original contributor also responds to the image again so that this response can feed into the process. When I saw the photo and the images researched and quotes, I thought of a David Lynch quote from Catching the Big Fish that I would like to contribute. First, I need to find the book.

“jur•nl is a collective of five young London-based artists and photographers working together on an experimental collaborative project with professionals, whilst also engaging others in the communication between images themselves as well as creative research.

“The jur•nl concept takes a stimulus from an artist/photographer/professional and during the week, as a collective and network, they gather research in the form of images/text/video etc on their site. At the end of the week they come together as a group and create a single image in response to the stimulus. Now, the collective has widened tthe call and anyone can contribute creative research on the site, in response to the stimuli.

“From the content gathered on the site, jur•nl will create zines which will feature the public contributors work/research alongside professionals.

The creative research jur•nl is looking for can be photographs, drawings, text, video… absolutely anything in a creative or research format which relates to the stimulus of the week. So far established artists and photographers contributing have included Zed Nelson, Elina Brotherus and Emma Critchley with many more to come.

“Get in touch with your submissions and be sure to write your name when submitting so the work can be tagged with your name. Please feel free to ask questions via email, or other social networking sites.” (from the press release)

Twitter @jurnlcollective
Facebook: Jur•nl collective
[email protected]

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: art. research, collaboration, collective, David Lynch, Jur•nl, London College of Communication, Photography, Wonder Valley

Shanghai duo Birdhead fly into Paradise Row for first solo show in London

Click to view slideshow.
All Photo Stroll iPhone photos, © Miranda Gavin. Photos of work © Birdhead.

If you want to get a taste of contemporary Shaghai in the 21st century, then head down to Paradise Row gallery where the debut London solo show of Shanghai-based photographic duo Birdhead – set up in 2004 by friends Ji Weiyu and Song Tao  – is on for the next two weeks.

Daily life in China is captured through a series of black and white images, Welcome to Birdhead World Again, using a snapshot aesthetic and arranged for the show as a series of grids and sets of multiple images. The images are specifically arranged and organised, much in the same way collectors categorise objects, while the grid arrangement allows the work to be read and experienced in multiple ways; left to right, right to left, up and down and vice versa, as well as diagonally. this arrangement could also been seen as echoing the block-like structure of buildings and the layout of many modern cities, making the reading of the work as dynamic as the city itself.

The classical Song dynasty poem, Youth Does Not Know How Sorrow Tastes, by Xin Qiji and translated by John Scott and Graham Martin, is  re-presented in the gallery space and provides inspiration for the images . “Each word of the poem is extracted photographically from neon signs and billboards around the city”, writes Katie Hill in the catalogue;  fragments from the past appropriated from contemporary culture.  One gallery visitor commented that the translation was, perhaps, too flowery. Welcome to Birdhead World Again runs until 4 April and is highly recommended.

Being touted as China’s hottest duo, Birdhead showed work at the recent 54th Venice Biennale. See over for more about the work.

All photos above © Birdhead, courtesy of the gallery.


Birdhead “use photography to capture, mediate and occupy their contemporary experience of daily life in Shanghai, China’s greatest metropolis whose ever increasing scale and vitality is more than itself – being read the world over as a gauge of the flow of power from West to East.

“Their tactical use of the snapshot aesthetic and the high volume of images they deploy make manifest a visual stream of consciousness. We see the artists going about their lives; being with friends, laughing, talking, eating, working, partying, sleeping etc. all this against the backdrop of the urban landscape of Shanghai. Tall towers, skyscrapers, telecoms masts and vast flyovers punctuate the images of human activity, of youth and consumer culture, illustrating the strange symbiosis between inanimate infrastructure and the life that it shelters and facilitates.

“Alongside their images, Birdhead present, Youth Does Not Know How Sorrow Tastes by Xin Qiji, a classic poem from the Song dynasty era. A melancholy masterpiece, the poem reflects upon the arc of experience that forms each life, the Romantic naiveté of youth and the price paid for wisdom. In common with Birdhead’s sensibility, the poem is imbued with the pathos of the individual set against the sweep of historical time.’ From the press release.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Shows, Visual Artists Tagged: Birdhead, contemporary photography, Ji Weiyu, Katie Hill, Paradise Row, Shanghai, Song Tao, Youth Does Not Know How Sorrow Tastes