Tag Archives: Masters Of Fine Arts

Viktoria Sorochinski, Attachment

Viktoria Sorochinski, Attachment

Viktoria Sorochinski

Attachment,
Montreal, 2006
From the Anna & Eve series
Website – ViktoriArt.com

Viktoria Sorochinski is a Ukrainian-born artist who has lived and studied in Russia, Israel, and Canada prior to settling in New York City, where she acquired her Masters of Fine Arts in 2008. Since 2001 she has participated in various group and solo exhibitions and international photography festivals in Canada, USA, France, Italy, Russia, China, Georgia and Argentina. She is also a finalist and winner of several international photography competitions and awards including Lucie Award – IPA (Discovery of the Year), Magenta Foundation's Flash Forward, PDN Photo Annual, Voices Off Arles, ONWARD, Review Santa Fe, Descubrimientos PHE, BluePrint Fellowship, and Encuentros Abiertos. Her work is widely published in internationally acclaimed magazines, among which are British Journal of Photography, EYEMAZING, NY Times, PDN, GUP, Le Monde, BLINK Magazine, THE PHOTO/ARTVAS, Planeando Sobre BUE, AZART Photo, and many others, as well as in web portals worldwide.

Lex Thompson, Breaking Wave

Lex Thompson, Breaking Wave

Lex Thompson

Breaking Wave,
Kauai, 2011
Website – LexThompson.com

Lex Thompson’s work focuses on manifestations of hope, failure, and irony in the American landscape. Trained as a historian at New College of Florida, he furthered his education at Yale University, obtaining a Masters of Religion with a concentration in Visual Arts. He continued his studies at the San Francisco Art Institute, where he received a Masters of Fine Arts in Photography. He is Assistant Professor of Photography at Bethel University in St. Paul, MN. He is recipient of a 2010 McKnight Artist Fellowship for Photographers, a 2008 & 2011 Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant, and was selected as a 2009 Flash Forward Emerging Photographer. His artwork is included in collections at the Getty Research Institute, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Stanford University, University of California Los Angeles, and Yale University, among others.

Christine Elfman

I recently came across Christine Elfman’s Cabinet Card images when looking at the roster of photographers participating last year’s Photo Review Exhibition. Christine is an artist working in photography, fibers, and painting and is current working towards a Masters of Fine Arts in Photography at the California College of the Arts, San Francisco, CA. She holds a BFA from Cornell University, after which she lived in Rochester, NY while working with 19th century photographic processes. In Spring of 2008, Christine was in residence at the Constance Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts in Ithaca, NY and in 2010 she was awarded a Career Development Program Fellowship from The Center for Emerging Visual Artists. Her work has been exhibited nationally.

Her unique approach to the photographic medium is evident in the work featured below. He site has a number of interesting projects that include photography, painting, and constructed works. Much of the work looks at nature and the passage of time, and processes are an important element of the resulting images and works.

Images from Cabinet Cards / Storydress II
albumen prints from wet-plate collodion negatives, mounted on cabinet cards

Brooklyn NY
Cabinet Card #1, from the stony dress project
Albumen print from wet plate collodion negative
on antique card. Lifesize paper mache
and plaster sculpture, 6.5″x4.25″

Brooklyn NY
Cabinet Card #2, from the stony dress project
Albumen print from wet plate collodion negative
on antique card. Lifesize paper mache
and plaster sculpture, 6.5″x4.25″

Anthotype Dress
Phytolacca americana / Pokeweed

September 2009 – January 2011

The process:
AnthotypeA process suggested by Sir John Herschel in 1842 that used the colored extracts and tinctures of flowers and vegetables to sensitize paper. Objects such as leaves, lace, and other thin materials were placed in contact with the sensitized paper and exposed to sunlight. Anthotypes were not fixed or stabilized, making them impossible to display except in night albums, for evening viewing.

– Focal Encyclopedia of Photography, 2007

Images from Red and White