Tag Archives: Master Of Fine Arts

Filter Photo Festival Week: Beth Gilbert

This week, I am sharing a few of photographers that I met at the Filter Photo Festival in Chicago….

Beth A. Gilbert presented a body of work in Chicago, Scarred Land, that looks at civilization’s impact on the environment, especially after the affects of war. The project focuses on Israel and the scarred landscape that reflects the trauma of conflict.  Beth lives and works in Boston and earned a BA in art with a concentration in photography from Simmons College, Boston. She worked for a professional, full-service photo lab, Color Services in Needham, MA as Assistant Digital Technician for 5 years. Beth now works for herself providing digital photographic post-production services. In the fall of 2013, Beth will be attending the Rochester Institute of Technology to pursue a Master of Fine Arts degree photography. Her work has been exhibited at the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University, the Danforth Museum of Art, and the Hadassah Gallery in Jerusalem. In addition, she has played a key role in the production of numerous photographic exhibitions for both nationally and internationally recognized artists.


 Restaurant Interior, Dead Sea, Israel 2010




My photographs are primarily landscape based, dealing with the environment, the ways in which human beings affect it and leave their mark upon it. One major influence reflected in the subject matter of my photographs is my interest and background in political science/middle eastern studies. My images have also been inspired by the work of Jem Southam, whose photographs capture a balance of the natural landscape and the intervention of man within it, following the cycles of decay and renewal, documenting the changes over days, months and years. Since the focus of my imagery relies heavily on society and civilization’s impact upon the environment, I am sensitive to my process being as non-invasive as possible- staying true to the unaltered landscape. I have a desire for my photographs to be ‘pure’, as in true to the original medium. My employment of a traditional tool of landscape photography, the 4×5 camera, and using minimal alterations to compliment my ideology fits in well with my artistic expression and vision. In 2010, I decided to take my ventures in photography further, and extended my vision to Israel.

 A Different Viewpoint, Gilbon, Israel 2010 

The photographs in this series entitled Scarred Land, which were all produced in Israel, deal with war, the damage it inflicts upon the terrain, and the natural recovery over time. The battle sites and military training zones depicted have not been memorialized or preserved in any way, and are now naturally recovering from the inflicted trauma as well as being reclaimed by the earth. The focus of the imagery on war zones is to portray to the viewer that this is how we, as human beings, treat each other and the world we live in.

 Charred Landscape, Gamla, Israel 2010 

We are a unique species defined by our intelligence: the ability of abstract thought, understanding, selfawareness, communication, reasoning, learning, having emotional knowledge, retaining, planning, and problem solving. This intelligence enables us to create/invent ever growing technologies through which to better our lives. Unfortunately, some of these technologies are also implemented for the purpose to assault one another and to defend ourselves, which in turn damages the Earth. In my opinion the rationale for going to war with another nation, state or people: whether it be over resources, religious ideology, cultural differences, or power is completely absurd. If everyone took the time to look at the larger picture, the traumas inflicted during war and in its aftermath have detrimental repercussions for not only us and future generations, but for the planet we inhabit and all of its living beings. Therefore, the ramifications are not advantageous to anyone or thing and we could eventually be the means to our own demise.

 Fire-Ravaged Ruins, Gamla, Israel 2010 
Barbed wire bush, Dead Sea, Israel 2010 

Abandoned Outpost, Dead Sea, Israel 2010 
(Un)Occupied Territory #1, Dead Sea, Israel 2010 
(Un)Occupied Territory #2, Dead Sea, Israel 2010 
Trenches from the ’48 and ’67 Wars, Jerusalem, Israel 2010 
Imbedded Plastic from Explosion, Golan Heights, Israel 2010 
Debris, IDF Firing Zone, Gamla, Israel 2010 
IDF Training Grounds, Golan Heights, Israel 2010 
Trench Entrance, Jerusalem, Israel 2010 
Syrian Sentry Post, Golan Heights, Israel 2010 
Fire-Scorched Valley, Gamla, Israel 2010 

Kyle Ford, Billboard with Trees

Kyle Ford, Billboard with Trees

Kyle Ford

Billboard with Trees,
Savannah, Georgia, 2008
From the Second Nature series
Website – KyleFordPhotography.com

Kyle Ford was born in the mountains of the Adirondack Park in upstate New York. He received his Bachelor of Sciences from Skidmore College in 2005 and his Master of Fine Arts from Savannah College of Art and Design in 2009. Kyle’s work has been featured in publications such as Newsweek Japan, Magenta’s Flash Forward and The Wall Street Journal. He is currently living in upstate New York and teaching classes at Skidmore College.

Sarah Malakoff

Sarah Malakoff’s photographs explore the idea of home, but I am drawn to the formal study of spaces that are more than just rooms, they are rooms with elements of quirky expression, each with a surprise twist.  I have to admit it, I’d like to hang out in these homes and meet the people who created these spaces.  The lack of human evidence makes the work feel like a movie set, ready for the drama to unfold. Sarah was awarded a spot in the 2009 Critical Mass top 50 portfolios with the project, Living Arrangements, and also exhibited it at the Griffin Museum of Photography.

Sarah lives and works in Boston,
Massachusetts and teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth.  She received her Master of Fine Arts
from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.  She has had numerous solo
exhibitions including the Sol Mednick Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, the Griffin Museum
of Photography in Winchester, MA, Howard Yezerski Gallery in Boston, MA and
Plane Space in New York, NY.  Her
photographs have recently been shown at the Carnegie Museum of Art in
Pittsburgh, The DeCordova Museum, The Portland Museum of Art, The Danforth
Museum of Art, The Smith College Museum of Art, The Photographic Resource
Center, and Photo Center Northwest.
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: My
photographs are examinations of the home as both a refuge from and at times a
re-creation of the outside world. 
In my images, architecture and furnishings appear as uncanny symbols of
culture, family, and nature.  With
the intentional exclusion of human occupants, my subjects spark curious
speculation of their own.  The
private and personal are expressed in part by objects and signifiers which are displayed
versus those which are hidden; what is allowed inside, and what is kept
out.  For example, doors and
windows both frame exterior views and keep the elements at bay.  Land, weather, and wildlife are ever
present on the other side of the wall even as they are brought safely inside in
the form of pattern, simulation, and domesticated animals.  Ironically, both indoors and out
equally project artifice.
    
These pictures speak to notions of comfort, class, and style as well as universal attempts to control and transcend our environment. Tensions, and often humor, appear between absence and presence, old and new, real and surreal, permanent and transient, genuine and artificial, the domestic and the natural worlds. The desire to resolve these tensions drives the viewer to create their own narrative and imagine possible inhabitants.

Robin Schwartz, Elijah’s Tail

Robin Schwartz, Elijah’s Tail

Robin Schwartz

Elijah’s Tail,
, 2010
From the Amelia’s World: Animal Affinity series
Website – RobinSchwartz.net

Robin Schwartz earned a Master of Fine Arts in Photography from Pratt Institute and her photographs are held in several museum collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art, The Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C., and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The Aperture Foundation published Schwartz’s third monograph, Amelia’s World, edited by Tim Barber. Images from this series were exhibited in Various Photographs, an installation curated by Barber for the New York Photo Festival and 100 Portraits—100 Photographers, a digital exhibition of current portraiture. Schwartz was a finalist at the Hyeres 2010 Photography Festival in France. She recently presented the Amelia Series at The National Geographic Magazine’s Annual Photography Seminar in Washington D.C.

Sarah Malakoff, Untitled Interior (blizzard)

Sarah Malakoff, Untitled Interior (blizzard)

Sarah Malakoff

Untitled Interior (blizzard),
Roslindale, Massachusetts, 2005
From the Living Arrangements series
Website – SarahMalakoff.com

Sarah Malakoff is a photographer who lives and works in Boston, Massachusetts and teaches at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. She received her Master of Fine Arts from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts. Her photographs are examinations of the home as both a refuge from and at times a re-creation of the outside world. She has had solo exhibitions at the Sol Mednick Gallery in Philadelphia, PA, the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA, Howard Yezerski Gallery in Boston, MA and Plane Space in New York, NY. Her photographs have also recently been shown at the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, The DeCordova Museum, The Portland Museum of Art, The Danforth Museum of Art, The Smith College Museum of Art, The Photographic Resource Center, and Photo Center Northwest.

Polly Gaillard

Mommy/Daddy from Truth, Fear & Fabrication

Polly Gaillard comes to photography with a camera bag full of life experiences that she mines for series that include themes of motherhood, children, memory, loss and family. She manages to find the intangible poignancy and undiscovered beauty in living life that is layered and complex. I am featuring her project, Reframing; Motherhood, Memory and Loss. These color images reflect personal life transitions and observations.

Polly received a Master of Fine Arts in Visual Arts from Vermont College of Fine Arts in 2010 and currently teaches photography at Anderson University in South Carolina. She is also an Artist-Teacher for Vermont College of Fine Arts. In Summer of 2012, Polly will be teaching photography in Prague for the University of New Orleans Prague Summer Seminars.

Polly has exhibited widely and her exhibitions for 2012 include Reframing; Motherhood, Memory and Loss at the Vandiver Gallery at Anderson University in Anderson, SC and in a group exhibit entitled Alignments at Clemson University’s Lee Gallery in Clemson, SC.

Reframing; Motherhood, Memory and Loss:
Reframing; Motherhood, Memory and Loss is a photographic series documenting my daughter after my divorce from her father. I am interested in the awkward moments we share, some constructed and others observed as she plays and is unaware of the camera. I am also interested in how the divorce plays out in our lives both in subtle and startling ways as I observe her through windows, behind a sofa pillow, or in the shadow of my house. The awkwardness of childhood surprises me as I record fragments of her body through the lens. To me, those fragments refer to the severing of the family unit. I am intrigued by this half-life we share due to custody obligations. She is here and then she is gone.

My process of that exploration shifted to one of documentation including photographing remnants of her presence, or what remains after the presence is absent from the scene. Basically, I am interested in how one’s daily actions accrue meaning, or stand in for that person despite their absence. These remnants take shape of ordinary things: a plastic bag that contained chocolate, Barbie dolls in the bathtub, or the remains of breakfast in the late morning light. The remnants, either photographed or scanned become a marker of life left by a physical presence, in this case they represent the presence of my young daughter.

The physical remains are obsessively collected and documented in a way that refers to the difficulty of letting go and the thoughts of loss that follow. My interaction with the remnants is a way to preserve it through the photograph, committing it to memory. The photographs strive to monumentalize the remnants and comment on the significance of loss, memory and absence.

Bernd Reinhardt

This, being sort of the official last day of summer, calls out for one last look at the potential of having time off–time to make work and time to hit the open road and leave the days open to possibility. That’s exactly what photographer/cinematographer Bernd Reinhardt was able to do this summer: take An American Road Trip.

Bernd was born in Germany where he studied English and Biology at the University of Heidelberg, but his dreams were of bright lights and the pull of the motion picture industry, so after graduating from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with a Master of Fine Arts in Film and Video Production, he headed west. Now a cinematographer for television and including his day (or should I say night) job for working for Jimmy Kimmel Live, Bernd still remains fascinated with American culture. He his the road this summer with his 4×5 camera, a good friend, and no expectations.

An American Road Trip: Growing up in Germany, I have always been fascinated with the expansive American landscape – and a road trip is the best way to experience it. Between the big cities, there are miles and miles of nothing – or so it seems when you have to traverse from one coast to another in as little time as possible. What I have come to discover is that when I slow down my time between destinations, the quiet beauty of America reveals itself.

On a recent road trip through the California desert in July, I loaded my old Volvo with cameras, film, and my good friend and fellow photographer Tom Munroe. We didn’t have a specific destination or artistic goal in mind, but we wanted to explore that quiet beauty between forgotten towns. It was like a fishing trip for photography. If we were lucky, we would catch something, otherwise we would still have a good time and a cold beer or two.

This was as much a journey of friendship as it was about photography, and what came out of this simple vacation filled with, at first glance, unremarkable places and people, was a profound reverence for all that we stumbled upon. We weren’t prepared for the beauty and the soulful quality of the people and places we encountered and we came away filled with a new respect for slowing down, pulling over, and taking the time to focus.

Bernd Reinhardt

This, being sort of the official last day of summer, calls out for one last look at the potential of having time off–time to make work and time to hit the open road and leave the days open to possibility. That’s exactly what photographer/cinematographer Bernd Reinhardt was able to do this summer: take An American Road Trip.

Bernd was born in Germany where he studied English and Biology at the University of Heidelberg, but his dreams were of bright lights and the pull of the motion picture industry, so after graduating from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with a Master of Fine Arts in Film and Video Production, he headed west. Now a cinematographer for television and including his day (or should I say night) job for working for Jimmy Kimmel Live, Bernd still remains fascinated with American culture. He his the road this summer with his 4×5 camera, a good friend, and no expectations.

An American Road Trip: Growing up in Germany, I have always been fascinated with the expansive American landscape – and a road trip is the best way to experience it. Between the big cities, there are miles and miles of nothing – or so it seems when you have to traverse from one coast to another in as little time as possible. What I have come to discover is that when I slow down my time between destinations, the quiet beauty of America reveals itself.

On a recent road trip through the California desert in July, I loaded my old Volvo with cameras, film, and my good friend and fellow photographer Tom Munroe. We didn’t have a specific destination or artistic goal in mind, but we wanted to explore that quiet beauty between forgotten towns. It was like a fishing trip for photography. If we were lucky, we would catch something, otherwise we would still have a good time and a cold beer or two.

This was as much a journey of friendship as it was about photography, and what came out of this simple vacation filled with, at first glance, unremarkable places and people, was a profound reverence for all that we stumbled upon. We weren’t prepared for the beauty and the soulful quality of the people and places we encountered and we came away filled with a new respect for slowing down, pulling over, and taking the time to focus.